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by Alastair McEwen,Umberto Eco
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History & Criticism
  • Author:
    Alastair McEwen,Umberto Eco
  • ISBN:
    0802035337
  • ISBN13:
    978-0802035332
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    University of Toronto Press, Scholarly Publishing Division (December 15, 2000)
  • Pages:
    112 pages
  • Subcategory:
    History & Criticism
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1515 kb
  • ePUB format
    1397 kb
  • DJVU format
    1768 kb
  • Rating:
    4.9
  • Votes:
    212
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Series: Toronto Italian Studies, Emilio Goggio Publications Series. Experiences in Translation is divided into two parts. The first, "Translating and Being Translated," is the more interesting and will appeal to both experienced and fledgling translators.

Series: Toronto Italian Studies, Emilio Goggio Publications Series. Paperback: 112 pages. Publisher: University of Toronto Press, Scholarly Publishing Division (April 5, 2008). The second, "Translation and Interpretation," deals with semiotics and seems aimed more at specialists. The book is based on a series of lectures Eco gave in 1998, but the insights are timeless.

Eco, Umberto Experiences in translation, Umberto Eco ; translated by Alastair McEwen. Toronto Italian studies) (Goggio publication series) Based on lectures presented Oct. 7, 9 & 13, 1998, at the Faculty of Information Studies, University of Toronto. Includes bibliographical references. ISBN 0-8020-3533-7 (bound). ISBN 978-0-802614-2 (pb. 1. Translating and interpreting. 2. Eco, Umberto Translations.

Experiences in Translation, by. Umberto Eco, novelist and. semiotician, is based on the Goggio. Eco’s personal experiences and. practice in translation, while. Translation and Interpretation. considers the theory of the.

Experiences in Translation Goggio publication series Toronto Italian Studies. Umberto Eco. Перевод: Alastair McEwen. Goggio Publication Series Toronto Italian studies Toronto Italian studies: Major Italian authors. Издание: перепечатанное.

Series: Emilio Goggio Publications Series. File: PDF, 484 KB. Читать онлайн.

In Experiences in Translation he draws on his substantial practical experience to identify and discuss some central problems of translation. Series: Emilio Goggio Publications Series.

Author(s): Umberto Eco, Alastair McEwen (translator). Experiences in Translation (Emilio Goggio Publications Series). ISBN: 0802035337 (ISBN13: 9780802035332). Published April 5th 2008 by University of Toronto Press. Author(s): Umberto Eco, Alastair McEwen (Translator).

series Emilio Goggio Publications Series

series Emilio Goggio Publications Series. In Experiences in Translation he draws on his substantial practical experience to identify and discuss some central problems of translation.

Emilio Goggio Publications Series.

In Experiences in Translation he draws on his substantial practical experience to identify and discuss some central problems of translation. Emilio Goggio Publications Series. Trade Paperback (US). Umberto Eco is Professor of Semiotics, University of Bologna.

Umberto Eco OMRI (5 January 1932 – 19 February 2016) was an Italian novelist, literary critic, philosopher, semiotician, and university professor

Umberto Eco OMRI (5 January 1932 – 19 February 2016) was an Italian novelist, literary critic, philosopher, semiotician, and university professor. He is widely known for his 1980 novel Il nome della rosa (The Name of the Rose), a historical mystery combining semiotics in fiction with biblical analysis, medieval studies, and literary theory. He later wrote other novels, including Il pendolo di Foucault (Foucault's Pendulum) and L'isola del giorno prima (The Island of the Day Before)

Umberto Eco, Alastair McEwen.

Umberto Eco, Alastair McEwen.

In this book Umberto Eco argues that translation is not about comparing two languages, but about the interpretation of a text in two different languages, thus involving a shift between cultures. An author whose works have appeared in many languages, Eco is also the translator of Gérard de Nerval's Sylvie and Raymond Queneau's Exercices de style from French into Italian. In Experiences in Translation he draws on his substantial practical experience to identify and discuss some central problems of translation. As he convincingly demonstrates, a translation can express an evident deep sense of a text even when violating both lexical and referential faithfulness. Depicting translation as a semiotic task, he uses a wide range of source materials as illustration: the translations of his own and other novels, translations of the dialogue of American films into Italian, and various versions of the Bible. In the second part of his study he deals with translation theories proposed by Jakobson, Steiner, Peirce, and others.

Overall, Eco identifies the different types of interpretive acts that count as translation. An enticing new typology emerges, based on his insistence on a common-sense approach and the necessity of taking a critical stance.


Mori
Eco is at his finest here. I use the work to augment the study of his book The Name of the Rose (well done by Sean Connery in movie format that I also employ in my classes) and the supplemental work illustrating and refining points in that wonderful treasure of fact and fiction, from Eco's Postscript to the Name of the Rose, to the well-crafted volume The Key to The Name of the Rose: Including Translations of All Non-English Passages (Ann Arbor Paperbacks) by Hart, White and White (all available on Amazon). Eco, an Italian semiotician, essayist, philosopher, literary critic, and novelist, is one of the premier investigators, researchers, translators, interpreters and writers in western civilization.

As in The Name of the Rose, and in all of his stellar literary efforts, Eco combines semiotics in fiction, biblical analysis, medieval studies and literary theory to captivate audiences in all areas of intellectual adventure and craftsmanship. This unique book on the trials, tribulations and triumphs of translation (and interpretation) goes into the subtleness of meaning of translation and details how it is impossible for an verbatim (word-for-word) translation will fail and why a true translator needs more than a dictionary or computer. Interpretation comes when a translation is correct but not easily understood and defines a separate field in the world of understanding languages. This should be used regulary, not just confined to the bookshelf to await a later use, of every translator and interpreter. I wish I could raise my rating to ten stars.
Wooden Purple Romeo
This is not a typical monograph about translation. It’s a very light read based on several Eco’s lectures. He shares his personal experience as a translator, as well as translated writer, showing a distinctive line between translating and writing professions. He advocates the utmost importance of delivering „proper“ translations, maintaing the intention and effect of the text.

This is a very good and easy read for anyone with the love for written word. It gives covers basic principles and challenges of literary translation.
Shakanos
For anyone interested in how literary translation works, this is an appropriate place to begin. Eco writes in a clear, almost spare manner, mixing general observations with actual examples from his own works. The Name of the Rose. his most famous novel, is cited from the standpoint of the challenges it represented for his various translators, and William Weaver, who rendered it into English, comes in for special kudos. Experiences in Translation is divided into two parts. The first, "Translating and Being Translated," is the more interesting and will appeal to both experienced and fledgling translators. The second, "Translation and Interpretation," deals with semiotics and seems aimed more at specialists. The book is based on a series of lectures Eco gave in 1998, but the insights are timeless. Recommended.
Jaiarton
A must for translators.
Terr
The book is a translation. In the original, the author talks about his work being translated and in translation. The book provides an insight into translation quality from an author's perspective for those who cannot read the original.
Malalanim
Read this a while ago and just realized I never made any notes on it yet it has been my favorite book on translation along with Douglas Hoffstadter's book "Le Ton Beau De Marot." How much should culture play a part? Why do people think a translation is anything like the book it purports to be? But then, I sure used to think that years ago pre-learning a second language. What would it do to a person's brain if they only read books in their own language? Or read only books written in their own language - or would translations still be that? What am I thinking anyway? Lots of interesting and fun questions arise while reading this book - whichever book it is.
Vertokini
Quality book, typical Eco. What's so difficult about translation? Isn't it really just a matter of synonymy between languages, or if not synonymy, then propositional content? Short answer: no.

For Eco fans, this is a must have book. Interested in language, translation, and interpretation? Clicky.