Download The Gernsback Days fb2

by Mike Ashley
Download The Gernsback Days fb2
History & Criticism
  • Author:
    Mike Ashley
  • ISBN:
    0809510553
  • ISBN13:
    978-0809510559
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Wildside Press; Wildside Press ed. edition (May 4, 2004)
  • Pages:
    500 pages
  • Subcategory:
    History & Criticism
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1886 kb
  • ePUB format
    1952 kb
  • DJVU format
    1462 kb
  • Rating:
    4.1
  • Votes:
    330
  • Formats:
    docx doc rtf lrf


The Gernsback Days book.

The Gernsback Days book. Ashley makes a good case that by 1929, Gernsback had successfully laid the groundwork for modern science fiction-and had even switched to using the term-even if his magazines were not always consistently high quality. He also makes a credible case that Gernsback was, at least in the 1930s, nevertheless putting out the best science fiction there was-although he would soon be eclipsed by Campbell at Astounding.

I hope you enjoy the trip. -Mike Ashley, Preface. In recent years there has been a resurgence of interest in Hugo Gernsback, and the start of a serious study of the contribution he made to the development of science fiction. It seemed to me that the time was due to reinvestigate the Gernsback era and dig into the facts surrounding the origins of Amazing Stories. I wanted to find out exactly why Hugo Gernsback had launched the magazine, what he was trying to achieve, and to consider what effects he had-good and ba. .

He has a special interest in fiction magazines and has written a multi-volume History of the Science Fiction Magazine and a study of British fiction magazines, The Age of the Storytellers

In recent years there has been a resurgence of interest in Hugo Gernsback, and the start of a serious study of the contribution he made to the development of science fiction.

In The Gernsback Days, Mike Ashley provides a work which looks at the birth of the field, the birth of fandom, and is a biography of Hugo Gernsback all at the same time. However, rather than display the schizophrenic nature a book that tries to do so much might be expected to show, Ashley has written an engaging and informative book. The book opens up with a relatively short description of Hugo Gernsback’s life and family in Europe and his arrival in the United States.

In Ashley, Mike; Lowndes, Robert . The Gernsback Days: A Study of the Evolution of Modern Science Fiction From 1911 to 1936. Holicong, Pennsylvania: Wildside. Bleiler, Everett . Bleiler, Richard J. (1998). Science-Fiction: The Gernsback Years. Westport CT: Kent State University Press.

Now, I hope, Robert A. W. Lowndes and I have provided the grounds for a fair consideration of their efforts, and a true reconstruction of the development of science fiction

Now, I hope, Robert A. Lowndes and I have provided the grounds for a fair consideration of their efforts, and a true reconstruction of the development of science fiction. It's the closest to time travel you'll ever get. I hope you enjoy the trip.

Mike Ashley has specialised in the history of science fiction and fantasy for over 30 years.

The Gernsback Days by Mike Ashley is a discussion of Gernsback's influence on science fiction and an overview of the SF of that time

The Gernsback Days by Mike Ashley is a discussion of Gernsback's influence on science fiction and an overview of the SF of that time. Update history: This page originally created 9 September 2002; latest revision 29 April 2012.

Mike Ashley - The Mammoth Book of Apocalyptic SF. EUR . 0. The Gernsback Days by Mike Ashley, Robert A W Lowndes (Hardback, 2004). Weird Legacies, Mike Ashley, Good Condition Book, ISBN 0352396571.

'In recent years there has been a resurgence of interest in Hugo Gernsback, and the start of a serious study of the contribution he made to the development of science fiction. . . . It seemed to me that the time was due to reinvestigate the Gernsback era and dig into the facts surrounding the origins of Amazing Stories. I wanted to find out exactly why Hugo Gernsback had launched the magazine, what he was trying to achieve, and to consider what effects he had-good and bad. . . . Too many writers and editors from the Gernsback days have been unjustly neglected, or unfairly criticized. Now, I hope, Robert A. W. Lowndes and I have provided the grounds for a fair consideration of their efforts, and a true reconstruction of the development of science fiction. It's the closest to time travel you'll ever get. I hope you enjoy the trip.'-Mike Ashley, Preface

Runeshaper
I've read and have several of Ashley's SF history volumes (The SF magazine...Transformations...) and yet I was a little disappointed in this volume. First, as the earlier viewer noted, text is small and difficult to read. But chapters are short and very well-written (easy to understand).

And I think anyone -with a little previous knowledge of that period and authors involved --could read a chapter here and chapter there, no need to read them all in sequence. (Bet the authors think otherwise!)

I thought they'd include some cover illlustrations or even some black and white internal drawings from the magazine. Sorry. It's 100% text only.

Probably only for the hard-core SF history fan, but if my eyes don't fail me, it looks to be another stimulating read.
MilsoN
...is knowing its modern history. Which wasn't born in Amazing Stories but amateur radio magazines run by, you guessed it, Gernsback. This massive tome about the early days of science fiction (as a genre as we come to think of it now; of course there was Wells and Verne etc) explains a lot about the creative tensions and genre distinctions that are with us to this present day in science fiction. Gernsback is certainly still a polarizing figure in the genre (think of William Gibson's story "The Gernsback Continuum"); BUT he certainly is more complicated a figure than his detractors would give him credit for. The author, while certainly "pro-Gernsback", is not fawning either, and you get a good sense of the nascent fan community too.

This book lost a star because the typeface was small and very grainy--it was readable, but barely. Which is too bad. Anyone looking to write, or write about, science fiction should read this book.