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by Neil Schaeffer
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History & Criticism
  • Author:
    Neil Schaeffer
  • ISBN:
    0679404074
  • ISBN13:
    978-0679404071
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Knopf; 1st edition (March 30, 1999)
  • Pages:
    567 pages
  • Subcategory:
    History & Criticism
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1409 kb
  • ePUB format
    1589 kb
  • DJVU format
    1402 kb
  • Rating:
    4.7
  • Votes:
    107
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    azw mobi rtf lrf


The Marquis de Sade would like us to believe that he is a martyr, a victim of hypocricy and social power. This book certainly argues this view well.

The Marquis de Sade would like us to believe that he is a martyr, a victim of hypocricy and social power. But de Sade is about extremes; taking our base desires and making them realities, and philosophically justifying these base desires as natural. Compared to the horrors of the twentieth century, however, de Sade's sexual and cruel exploits seem almost quaint. Neil Schaeffer should be commended.

The Marquis de Sade book. Neil Schaeffer presents here a wholly original, compellingly human portrait of the divine Marquis, the enigmatic legend whose name is synonymous with brutal perversion and cruelty.

Schaeffer reveals the surprisingly unsadistic Sade: his capacity for deep .

Schaeffer reveals the surprisingly unsadistic Sade: his capacity for deep romantic love, his passionate adherence to Enlightenment principles, his inexhaustible charm, his delusional paranoia. But with the publication of the novels he wrote behind bars, books denounced as lewd and blasphemous, he was again imprisoned. Under Napoleon, Sade spent almost twelve years in an insane asylum, where he died at the age of seventy-four following a final dalliance with a teenage girl. Schaeffers new biography of the Marquis de Sade is unlucky in its timing, following in the wake of those of Francine du Plessix Gray (LJ 9/15/98) and Laurence L. Bongie (LJ 11/1/98).

Ideas of the Marquis de Sade. a b Schaeffer, Neil (1999). The Marquis de Sade: a Life. New York City: Knopf Doubleday. Hindley herself claimed that Brady would send her to obtain books by Sade, and that after reading them he became sexually aroused and beat he. .In Philosophy in the Bedroom Sade proposed the use of induced abortion for social reasons and population control, marking the first time the subject had been discussed in public.

In his life and writing, Sade fought the limitations of authority, morality and convention. It was an argument he would lose, paying dearly with his liberty and reputation. In this enthralling new biography Neil Schaeffer brings to life this struggle, and vividly presents to us all the contradictions and complexities of 'the devine Marquis'. The book leaves a powerful impression on the mind, one of immense sadness' Observer. Schaeffer's eloquent, passionate biography. restores the perverse Marquis to garish life' Mail on Sunday. Books by Neil Schaeffer.

Schaeffer especially criticized the depiction of the de Sade as a "martyr to the oppression and censorship of church and state" and that the film distorted facts "to a surreal and didactic conclusion that has no connection with the truth, and is probably overwrought even as a twist of a fictional plot", namely that "the seemingly.

Translated by. Austryn wainhouse. The Marquis de Sade wanted what no mere formal rearrangements could provide, what no modifications of material and relative conditions can alone satisfy; he wanted a permanent insurrection of the spirit, an intimate revolution, a revolution within. He wanted then what today revolution no longer holds impossible but holds to be a starting point as well as a final end: to change man.

Neil Schaeffer presents here a wholly original, compellingly human portrait of the "divine Marquis," the enigmatic .

Neil Schaeffer presents here a wholly original, compellingly human portrait of the "divine Marquis," the enigmatic legend whose name is synonymous with brutal perversion and cruelty. Against a magnificently embroidered backdrop of eighteenth-century France, he shows us Sade's incredible life of sexual appetite, adherence to Enlightenment principles, imprisonment, scandal, and above all inexhaustible imagination

The Marquis De Sade: A Life. Author:Schaeffer, Neil. Book Binding:Hardback. We appreciate the impact a good book can have.

The Marquis De Sade: A Life. We all like the idea of saving a bit of cash, so when we found out how many good quality used books are out there - we just had to let you know! Read full description. See details and exclusions. The Marquis De Sade by Neil Schaeffer (Hardback, 1999). Pre-owned: lowest price.

Against a magnificently embroidered backdrop of eighteenth-century France, he shows us Sade's incredible life of sexual appetite, adherence to Enlightenment principles, imprisonment, scandal, and above all inexhaustible imagination. Format Hardback 576 pages.

A wholly original, compellingly human portrait of the "divine Marquis," the enigmatic legend whose name is synonymous with brutal perversion and desirous cruelty.Against a magnificently embroidered backdrop of eighteenth-century France, Neil Schaeffer reconstructs the almost incredible adventures of Donatien-Alphonse-Francois de Sade. When he was a young man, married off against his wishes to a middle-class heiress, his insatiable sexual appetites and disdain for all forms of convention drew him into a series of scandals, first with prostitutes and then with his sister-in-law. His enraged, social-climbing mother-in-law conspired with the authorities, and the result was Sade's thirteen-year imprisonment without trial. Later, freed by the Revolution, the brilliantly protean Marquis became a revolutionary leader himself and then narrowly escaped the guillotine. But with the publication of the novels he wrote behind bars, books denounced as lewd and blasphemous, he was again imprisoned. Under Napoleon, Sade spent almost twelve years in an insane asylum, where he died at the age of seventy-four following a final dalliance with a teenage girl.  Schaeffer reveals the surprisingly unsadistic Sade: his capacity for deep romantic love, his passionate adherence to Enlightenment principles, his inexhaustible charm, his delusional paranoia. And through a dazzling reading of his novels, including the notorious masterpiece 120 Days of Sodom, he argues powerfully for Sade as one of the great literary imaginations of the eighteenth century, one who maintained a lifelong, ultimately self-destructive argument against the limitations of authority and morality. Based on a decade of research, The Marquis de Sade is a definitive work that shatters nearly two hundred years of myth to reveal an irresistible Promethean figure of astonishing complexity.

Zololmaran
A very clinical and objective look into the life and mind of de Sade. Almost too much detail here but if you are really interested in the man there is no such thing.
Ndav
This is a very good and in depth book regarding The Marquis. I think the author did and extraordinary job. I would also recommend you read Dark Eros by Thomas Moore.
Tat
I haven't finished the book yet, and while I am enjoying the writing and the pace of the book, I'm having major issues with Schaeffer's seemingly blinkered 21st century view about an 18th century man, and I find his (Schaeffer's) seeming complete disinterest or lack of knowledge about the surrounding context quite frustrating. Just a couple of examples: Schaeffer wonders what sort of mother would send her 4 year old son away, without seeming to realize that the more appropriate, and interesting question, at least for the time and social situation, would be what sort of mother kept her son with her for the first 4 years of his life? Then Schaeffer wonders what sort of father would organize a loveless match purely for financial and social gain? Umm, I would guess about 99% of all 18th century fathers in that social milieu. Then Schaeffer tries to build some sort of mystery around why a prostitute would have dared to report Sade to the police, when in fact the link between prostitutes and police was VERY close in 18th century Paris and police were constantly being called in mediate in complaints between prostitute and client. Schaeffer seems much more interested in Sade's inner man / psychological makeup but it's hard to understand why he would so ignore the historical context.
Syleazahad
Schaeffer's De Sade is a noble and successful attempt at historical revisionism; this work painstakingly strips away the mythological Marquis de Sade as [a] monster, and elegantly reveals a literary genius, a victim of the aristocracy, who's life mission was to explore and rationalize the dark side of human nature.
One would not be remiss in calling the Marquis the father of libertinism. His life and work exemplifies the libertine ethos, that is, "rules are meant to be broken, that the laws of religion and society are artificial limitations without intrinsic value, and that the only law is the law of nature that authorizes any action for the sake of pleasure." (359) The irony, however, is that the king of libertinism spent the majority of his life behind bars, pushing the bounderies, breaking the rules of imposed morality with only his pen and an imagination geared to fulfil his every bent desire. As Schaeffer points out, the greater irony was behind the 18th century pomp and circumstance of the French aristocracy, de Sade's '120 Days of Sodom' barely scratches the surface of how these priviliged wigged lunatics really spent their time. De Sade's true nemesis was a woman: Mme de Montreuil - de Sade's mother in law. She wanted the man out of the way and she succeeded without question.
As a study of character and the way the human mind reacts while incarcerated, this book is a revelation. Of course, similar to most criminals, de Sade believed himself to be innocent; his predicament was always someone else's fault. To a large extent, he was right. But paranoia is a strong emotion, an exaggerated fear of the world against you: jailed for decades for no apparent "real" reason, one's mind will find a reason. Conspiracy theories provide answers and meaning to one's life - or at least an explanation for one's suffering. De Sade's theories, understandably, went beyond the pale. If anything, this biography is a fine study of how far a creative mind will reach for answers when backed against a wall. The letters between de Sade and his wife, Renee, while in prison, would be substantial material for any in-depth study or research project on the intricacies of paranoia. Renee would be the subject of another biographical study of equal stature to de Sade. What a fascinating individual. Reading only the fragments of these letters in the book is worth the time.
The Marquis de Sade would like us to believe that he is a martyr, a victim of hypocricy and social power. This book certainly argues this view well. But de Sade is about extremes; taking our base desires and making them realities, and philosophically justifying these base desires as natural. This argument doesn't work, because to live in society we must abide by the social contract - otherwise there is no society. De Sade, through his literature, showed us how far the imagination could travel to its darkest depths. Compared to the horrors of the twentieth century, however, de Sade's sexual and cruel exploits seem almost quaint.
Reading this book is well worth the effort, if one is interested in the nature of power, the intricacies of paranoia, and an honest account of a man of letters who ranks amongst the best. Neil Schaeffer should be commended.
Laizel
Having seen the movie Quills some time ago I was interested to learn more about the historical Sade. Schaeffer provides a very thorough account of Sade's 74 years. The numerous excerpts from his letters give the reader an opportunity to get to know the real Sade. Much of the myth of this interesting writer is dispelled, but one can clearly see how they came into existence. My final impression of Sade is of a man of extremes, especially in his literature, who desperately sought to find his place in a society that he found too conservative for his liberal sexual views. Overall the book was an enjoyable and interesting read. I came away not only with more knowledge of Sade, but also of the French Revolution and prison practices during that era. I recommend this book to history buffs and those who enjoy biographies. The Marquis de Sade was definitely not you average ordinary French aristocrat.
Shaktiktilar
I picked this book up to learn more about one of history's infamous characters. His name has become synonomous with debauchery and defilement of sexual partners of all persuasions.

Unfortunately, the author attempts to give us an all-encompassing view of the man, but mostly fails.

He does cover the chronology of Sade's life, but the writing tends to be tedious and choppy. What should be a fascinating subject, becomes a labor to move through.

We do learn why he is impisoned, how he completes his writing on toilet paper (do not be confused with the toilet paper which Mr. Whipple used to squeeze in the grocery store, which brings a whole new comparison to modern times versus those Sade lived in), and how his marital life fell apart, but I never quite came to understand what really drove the Marquis De Sade, what made him tick.

Obviously, this is a difficult objective to understand, as there are no living friends, relatives or neighbors to interview, but as well studied and versed the author is in the subject's life, I would have appreciated at least his conjecture.

Save your time on this one, I am sure there are better reads on the subject.