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by W. Jeffrey Tatum,Ronnie Ancona,Laurie Haight Keenan
Download A Caesar Reader: Selections from Bellum Gallicum and Bellum Civile, and from Caesar's Letters, Speeches, and Poetry (Latin Edition) (Latin Readers) (Latin and English Edition) fb2
History & Criticism
  • Author:
    W. Jeffrey Tatum,Ronnie Ancona,Laurie Haight Keenan
  • ISBN:
    086516696X
  • ISBN13:
    978-0865166967
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Bolchazy Carducci Pub; first edition (January 2, 2012)
  • Pages:
    206 pages
  • Subcategory:
    History & Criticism
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1530 kb
  • ePUB format
    1956 kb
  • DJVU format
    1118 kb
  • Rating:
    4.9
  • Votes:
    402
  • Formats:
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Over half of the Latin Tatum selects comes from the Bellum Gallicum,and these selections are more or less the ones that you would expect to see. The reader begins with the celebrated Gallia est omnis divisa, then moves into the Helvetian campaign.

Over half of the Latin Tatum selects comes from the Bellum Gallicum,and these selections are more or less the ones that you would expect to see. Tatum chooses passages here that highlight Caesar as a propagandist and apologist, and supports this characterization with background essays and notes that provide context for why the Romans feared Celtic tribes and how Caesar took pains to justify his involvement

A Caesar Reader book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read

A Caesar Reader book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read.

ISBN: 9780865166967, 086516696X.

A Caesar reader: selections from Bellum Gallicum and Bellum civile, and from Caesar's letters, speeches, and poetry.

Geoffrey Steadman, 2011. A Caesar reader: selections from Bellum Gallicum and Bellum civile, and from Caesar's letters, speeches, and poetry. Mundelein, IL: Bolchazy-Carducci Publishers In. 2011. Eden, Caesar’s Style: Inheritance versus Intelligence, Glotta 40 (1962) 74-117.

This reader teaches the rudiments of Latin prose by reinforcing transferable skills that can be applied to other prose .

This reader teaches the rudiments of Latin prose by reinforcing transferable skills that can be applied to other prose authors. The comedic playwright Plautus and the Roman historian Sallust are significant in studying the culture and history of Rome and serve as ideal sources in the study of Latin for modem students.

Unless otherwise noted, citations of primary sources and general overview from Edward Courtney, The Fragmentary Latin Poets (Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1993), pp. 153–155 and 187–188

at Sight and on Re-Translation into Latin, and a Complete Vocabulary to Caesar.

1-23 of the Bellum Gallicum) : with Introducation, Notes, Maps, and Illustrations, Appendices with Hints and Exercises on Translation at Sight and on Re-Translation into Latin, and a Complete Vocabulary to Caesar. 1-23 of the Bellum Gallicum) : with Introducation, Notes, Maps, and Illustrations, Appendices with Hints and Exercises on Translation at Sight and on Re-Translation into Latin, and a Complete Vocabulary to Caesar.

1, 7, 11–12, 34–36; BOOK 2: 1. –22. 2; BOOK 5: 27; BOOK 6: 13–14, 16, 21, 24, Bellum Civile BOOK 1: 3–4, 7, 22–23; BOOK 2: 31–32; BOOK 3: 1, 57, 10. –104. 3, Cicero Ad Atticum . C (Caesar to Oppius and Cornelius), 1. B (Caesar to Cicero), Suetonius Vita Divi Iulii 6 (fragment of Caesar’s funeral oration for his aunt Julia), Suetonius Vita Terentii 7 (Caesar’s poem on Terence).

A mature but accessible Latin, a narrative brimming with historical significance and fascination: these were once touted as obvious advantages of reading Caesar's Bellum Gallicum. A change in sensibilities, however, read Rome s brutal invasion and conquest of northern Europe as problematic, if not disturbing. But questions about the validity of Rome s actions and of Caesar s, especially in his later Bellum Civile are precisely what make these commentaries compelling to read and to discuss. Additional selections from Caesar s letters, speeches, and poetry offer fresh perspectives on his stylistic versatility. Tatum s commentary guides readers through it all, pointing up Caesar s significance as a representative of his age, culture, and class, while not skirting issues raised by the intriguingly unsimple mentality that gave us these works. Introduction to Caesar s life, times, works, and style 588 lines of unadapted Latin text selected from Caesar s two historical commentaries as well as from his extant correspondence, oratory, and poetry: Bellum Gallicum BOOK 1: 1.1 1.4, 2.1 3.1, 7, 11 12, 34 36; BOOK 2: 19.6 22.2; BOOK 5: 27; BOOK 6: 13 14, 16, 21, 24 Bellum Civile BOOK 1: 3 4, 7, 22 23; BOOK 2: 31 32; BOOK 3: 1, 57, 103.2 104.3 Cicero Ad Atticum 9.7C (Caesar to Oppius and Cornelius), 10.8B (Caesar to Cicero) Suetonius Vita Divi Iulii 6 (fragment of Caesar s funeral oration for his aunt Julia) Suetonius Vita Terentii 7 (Caesar s poem on Terence) Notes at the back and complete vocabulary Appendix on Latin prose rhythm Three maps and three illustrations

Cyregaehus
Caesar is Caesar. What makes this book great is Tatum's commentary. It's really helpful in the beginning books and as you progress, the commentary gives you less and less "translate thus" and more "this is a subordinate clause," which is nice because it shows you knowledge base is (should be) growing.
Dianantrius
Great condition- next to perfect.
It's so easy
Perfect, exactly as described.