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by Sarah Wadsworth
Download In the Company of Books: Literature and Its Classes in Nineteenth-Century America (Studies in Print Culture and the History of the Book) fb2
History & Criticism
  • Author:
    Sarah Wadsworth
  • ISBN:
    1558495401
  • ISBN13:
    978-1558495401
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    University of Massachusetts Press (July 26, 2006)
  • Pages:
    296 pages
  • Subcategory:
    History & Criticism
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1610 kb
  • ePUB format
    1930 kb
  • DJVU format
    1604 kb
  • Rating:
    4.7
  • Votes:
    203
  • Formats:
    lit docx azw txt


It makes a significant contribution to American literary studies by situating the development of ury American literature in the context of the evolving economics of trade publishing during that period. Tracing the segmentation of the literary marketplace in nineteenth-century America, this book analyzes the implications of the subdivided literary field for readers, writers, and literature itself.

Her book is a key addition to the Studies in Print Culture and the History .

Her book is a key addition to the Studies in Print Culture and the History of the Book series. By the 1870s, the book market fragmented. Reader interest, class, level of education, gender, and stage of life all contributed to new marketing of the print culture.

Studies in Print Culture and the History of the Book). by. Sarah Wadsworth (Goodreads Author). A vital feature of American culture in the nineteenth century was the growing awareness that the literary marketplace consisted not of a single, unified, relatively homogeneous reading public but rather of many disparate, overlapping reading communities differentiated by interests, class, and level of education as well as by gender and stage of life.

This series includes a substantial list of books on the history of print culture, authorship, reading, writing, printing, and publishing. Manuscript Submissions. Please direct manuscript inquiries to

Great deals on one book or all books in the series. In the Company of Books: Literature And Its "Classes" in Nineteenth-century America. Learning to Read and Write in Colonial America. E. Jennifer Monaghan.

Great deals on one book or all books in the series. What A Book Can Do: The Publication and Reception of Silent Spring. Priscilla Coit Murphy. Reading Books: Essays on the Material Text and Literature in America. The Holocaust and the Book: Destruction and Preservation.

Recent papers in Nineteenth-Century American Literature and Culture. The journal English Literature: Theories, Interpretations, Contexts, published at Ca' Foscari University of Venice, invites scholars to send article proposals on the topic of. Fictions, Facts and "Effects of Reality": Questioning the Mimetic in the Nineteenth-Century Novel.

The Cambridge Companions to Literature and Classics form a book series published by Cambridge University Press. Each book is a collection of essays on the topic commissioned by the publisher. Topics Theatre History by David Wiles and Christine Dymkowski African American Theatre by Harvey Young Piers Plowman by Andrew Cole and Andrew Galloway. Cambridge Companions.

It examines the musical, social, commercial and aesthetic functions songsters served and the processes by which they were produced and disseminated, the repertory they included, and the singers, printers and entrepreneurs that both inspired their manufacture and facilitated their consumption

Did the colonial book trade consist of books imported from Europe or of local production? Can we go behind the iconic status of the Bay Psalm Book to recover its actual history? Was Michael Wigglesworth's Day of Doom really a bestseller? And why did an Indian gravesite contain a scrap o. .

Did the colonial book trade consist of books imported from Europe or of local production? Can we go behind the iconic status of the Bay Psalm Book to recover its actual history? Was Michael Wigglesworth's Day of Doom really a bestseller? And why did an Indian gravesite contain a scrap of Psalm 98 in a medicine bundle buried with a young Pequot girl? In answering these and other questions, Amory writes broadly about the social and economic history of printing, bookselling and book ownership. At the heart of his work is a determination to connect the materialities of printed books with the.

A vital feature of American culture in the nineteenth century was the growing awareness that the literary marketplace consisted not of a single, unified, relatively homogeneous reading public but rather of many disparate, overlapping reading communities differentiated by interests, class, and level of education as well as by gender and stage of life. Tracing the segmentation of the literary marketplace in nineteenth-century America, this book analyzes the implications of the subdivided literary field for readers, writers, and literature itself.

With sections focusing on segmentation by age, gender, and cultural status, In the Company of Books analyzes the ways authors and publishers carved up the field of literary production into a multitude of distinct submarkets, differentiated their products, and targeted specific groups of readers in order to guide their book-buying decisions. Combining innovative approaches to canonical authors such as Nathaniel Hawthorne, Louisa May Alcott, Mark Twain, and Henry James with engaging investigations into the careers of many lesser-known literary figures, Sarah Wadsworth reveals how American writers responded to -- and contributed to -- this diverse, and diversified, market.

In the Company of Books contends that specialized editorial and marketing tactics, in concert with the narrative strategies of authors and the reading practices of the book-buying public, transformed the literary landscape, leading to new roles for the book in American culture, the innovation of literary genres, and new relationships between books and readers. Both an exploration of a fragmented print culture through the lens of nineteenth-century American literature and an analysis of nineteenth-century American literature from the perspective of this subdivided marketplace, this wide-ranging study offers fresh insight into the impact of market forces on the development of American literature.