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by Paul Keen
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History & Criticism
  • Author:
    Paul Keen
  • ISBN:
    0521653258
  • ISBN13:
    978-0521653251
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Cambridge University Press (November 28, 1999)
  • Pages:
    316 pages
  • Subcategory:
    History & Criticism
  • Language:
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    1571 kb
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    1269 kb
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    1150 kb
  • Rating:
    4.2
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    209
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Print Culture and the Public Sphere .

Print Culture and the Public Sphere. This book offers an original study of the debates which arose in the 1790s about the nature and social role of literature. Paul Keen shows how these debates were situated at the intersection of the French Revolution and a more gradual revolution in information and literacy reflecting the aspirations of the professional classes in eighteenth-century England.

Электронная книга "The Crisis of Literature in the 1790s: Print Culture and the Public Sphere", Paul Keen. Эту книгу можно прочитать в Google Play Книгах на компьютере, а также на устройствах Android и iOS. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "The Crisis of Literature in the 1790s: Print Culture and the Public Sphere" для чтения в офлайн-режиме.

This book offers an original study of debates that arose in the 1790s about the nature and social role of literature and the new . Cambridge Studies in Romanticism . Title Page .

This book offers an original study of debates that arose in the 1790s about the nature and social role of literature and the new class of readers produced by the revolution in information and literacy in eighteenth-century England. The first part concentrates on the dominant arguments about the role of literature and the status of the author; the second shifts its focus to the debates about working-class activists and radical women authors, and examines the growth of a Romantic ideology within this context of political and cultural turmoil.

Keen’s impressive study commences with the seemingly straightforward question of what actually constituted literature in the 1790s. Keen not only situates literature in the public sphere but reads it as a public sphere (10). The answer, however, is anything but simple, as the 299 pages, packed with information, prove to their readers: By no means did literature only relate to poetic works in a narrow sense – on the contrary, literature comprised texts in any subjects and on any topic, ranging from theology to natural philosophy.

Start by marking The Crisis of Literature in the 1790s: Print Culture and the Public Sphere (Cambridge Studies in Romanticism) as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. This book offers an original study of debates that arose in the 1790s about the nature and social role of literature and the new class of readers produced by the revolution in information and literacy in eighteenth-century England.

Article in Romanticism on the Net · January 2002 with 4 Reads. The present study of the Agency for Economic Programming and Development aims to characterize the inflation process based on the existing measures, as well as on the elaborated custom indices

Article in Romanticism on the Net · January 2002 with 4 Reads. How we measure 'reads'. DOI: 1. 202/007212ar. The present study of the Agency for Economic Programming and Development aims to characterize the inflation process based on the existing measures, as well as on the elaborated custom indices. The paper put special focus on the assessment of the real interest rate level during 1991.

The increasingly complicated relationships between books and the reading public .

The increasingly complicated relationships between books and the reading public have already been explored in the past, most successfully by Jon Klancher in The Making of English Reading Audiences, 1790-1832 (1987) and by Paul Magnuson in Reading Public Romanticism (1998). Keen demonstrates that the number of procedures which controlled and distributed the production of literature was actually unlimited and vastly complex in the politically unsettled years of the last decade of the eighteenth century. The Crisis of Literature opens up new possibilities of re-reading literature within such a complicated historical context at the turn of the eighteenth century.

Audio Books & Poetry Community Audio Computers & Technology Music, Arts & Culture News & Public Affairs .

Audio Books & Poetry Community Audio Computers & Technology Music, Arts & Culture News & Public Affairs Non-English Audio Radio Programs. Librivox Free Audiobook. Spirituality & Religion Podcasts. reading - Great Britain - History - 18th century, Romanticism - Great Britain - History - 18th century, Printing - Great Britain - History - 18th century, Great Britain - History - 1789-1820. Cambridge University Press. inlibrary; printdisabled; ; china.

This book offers an original study of the debates which arose in the 1790s about the nature and social role of. .

This book offers an original study of the debates which arose in the 1790s about the nature and social role of literature.

ABSTRACT Keen’s impressive study commences with the seemingly straightforward question of what actually constituted literature in the 1790s

ABSTRACT Keen’s impressive study commences with the seemingly straightforward question of what actually constituted literature in the 1790s.

This book offers an original study of debates that arose in the 1790s about the nature and social role of literature and the new class of readers produced by the revolution in information and literacy in eighteenth-century England. The first part concentrates on the dominant arguments about the role of literature and the status of the author; the second shifts its focus to the debates about working-class activists and radical women authors, and examines the growth of a Romantic ideology within this context of political and cultural turmoil.