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by David MacAulay
Download Motel of the Mysteries fb2
History & Criticism
  • Author:
    David MacAulay
  • ISBN:
    0395284244
  • ISBN13:
    978-0395284247
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Houghton Mifflin (January 1, 1988)
  • Pages:
    95 pages
  • Subcategory:
    History & Criticism
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1963 kb
  • ePUB format
    1813 kb
  • DJVU format
    1646 kb
  • Rating:
    4.2
  • Votes:
    671
  • Formats:
    txt rtf azw rtf


Macaulay's Motel of the Mysteries is a classic, hilarious send-up of archaeological investigation and interpretation, in which anything we don't understand is interpreted as having had religious significance.

Macaulay's Motel of the Mysteries is a classic, hilarious send-up of archaeological investigation and interpretation, in which anything we don't understand is interpreted as having had religious significance. Written in the same style as old National Geographic articles (especially the classic coverage of Howard Carter's opening of Tutankhamen's tomb), it presents a comically garbled interpretation of a 20th Century motel that is excavated centuries later, only to be mis-interpreted as a tomb complex.

Motel of the Mysteries book. I think David Macaulay is better known for his non-fiction illustrated books, often aimed at children, that explain how things were made, but I loved this illustrated spoof of archaeology. It is the year 4022; all of the ancient country of Usa has. In 4022, archaeologists excavate a cheap motel buried in the 1985 disaster that covers North America with a solidified crust composed of junk mail, and solidified air pollution – and proceed to systematically misinterpret the site as an ancient mortuary, based upon the one room that contained a couple of skeletons.

David Macaulay was born in Burton upon Trent and raised in. .Great Moments in Architecture (1978). Motel of The Mysteries (1979).

David Macaulay was born in Burton upon Trent and raised in Lancashire, England.

Motel of the mysteries. Motel of the mysteries. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books.

Macaulay has garnered numerous awards including the Caldecott Medal and Honor Awards, the Boston Globe–Horn Book Award, the Christopher Award, an American Institute of Architects Medal, and the Washington Post–Children’s Book Guild Nonfiction Award.

The book is called Motel of the Mysteries and is written by David MacAulay. In this book the story starts in the present where the whole intire Northern American Continent is covered with an avalance of junk mail. Instantly killing everyone, there is not much known about the 'Yanks' from then on. That is untill the year 4022 where an amateur archeologist finds himself at the entrance of an ancient 'Usa' burial site.

Motel of the Mysteries - David Macaulay. Perhaps by the year 4022, nobody will think this is funny, but so far time has not dulled the wit of Macaulay's wonderful little book. kimreadthisGo to kimreadthis's profile. What a great premise - humans of the far-off future excavate a hotel from the United States from the 1970s/1980s.

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Those books often had their funny side notes, but in Motel of the Mysteries Macaulay turns positively wicked, bringing .

Those books often had their funny side notes, but in Motel of the Mysteries Macaulay turns positively wicked, bringing his British-born sensibility to bear as he skewers the idea that America’s greatest accomplishments will be recognized for what they were long after they’re gone. There’s another, subtler swipe at us in the book, too. When American fiction considers the end of the country, we tend to assume our own crude, arrogant form of domino theory: that when we go, everything else will swiftly follow into the abyss. Our agonizing about our fate is often just another way of explaining that we don’t believe the planet would last long without us.

Amateur archaeologist Howard Carson draws wholly erroneous conclusions about the civilization of the ancient country of Usa when he accidentally stumbles upon Motel Toot

Connorise
It's humor/satire in the best tradition - something that pokes fun at (some would say skewers) those who tend to take themselves far too seriously. In this case we're talking about archeologists, but even at that it's limited to those who make too many intellectual leaps from the available evidence. By that I mean those scientists who tend to input too much in the way of fiction or story telling to artifacts.

It's done so gently, but the tone is spot on - the same pronouncements done with no doubt whatsoever and yet objectively wrong. We have the benefit here of knowing what the actual truth is, which is where the humor is grounded. Macaulay really has done a good job in this parody of a serious scientific work, so much so that one kind of wonders what the *real* story is when reading, oh, the latest paleontological findings or other similar papers. This isn't to say that all science is wrong - not at all - but only to wonder what if science doesn't necessarily know what it thinks it knows And again, I'm talking about scientists who go a bit too far in their theorizing.

I like this book - a lot. It's a fun parody.
GODMAX
This is a story about a man who discovers the United States - years after it disappeared mysteriously into the mists of time.

As this scientist and his crew uncover many ancient artifacts, they do their best to piece together how various items were used in this ancient culture. Their conviction that the motel they've discovered is an ancient burial ground colors their interpretation of every item that they find.

Macaulay's illustrations bring the text to life, allowing the reader to see the humor it what is going on - Macauley is able to reference various items they've discovered by the name given them by the scientists, but the illustrations show us what it is that they've really found. (e.g., the pictures show us that the "Sacred Collar" worn at the final burial ceremony is actually a toilet seat.)

Of course, what Macauley really does, and does brilliantly, is point out how arrogant it is for us to assume that we can piece together an entire culture's way of life by analyzing a few odds and ends and giving them purposes, even though we have no way to determining whether what we've decided is true is actually true.

"Motel of the Mysteries" is an excellent reminder to keep our perspective as we study ancient cultures and peoples - a reminder that scientists are fallible humans like anyone else.
VAZGINO
What will our world look like to future archaeologists? In this book David Macaulay takes a humorous look at the possibilities as our descendants explore an ancient motel and mistake a toilet seat for a headdress and so on.

It's cute, nothing great but cute. And Macaulay's illustrations are always cool.
Mori
The year is 4022. An amateur archaeologist has discovered an ancient tomb from the early 1970s, complete with two skeletal remains - one resting in a ceremonial bed, the other worshipping at an altar. Except that the tomb is a motel, the "sarcophagus" is a bathtub, & the "altar" is a toilet ("sanitized for your protection"). Macaulay's drawings are a hoot - my favorite is the young lady proudly wearing the "sacred collar & matching headband" (the seat & lid of the toilet) with a pair of toothbrushes dangling from her ears. Anyone who has wondered whether modern archaeologists who speculate about the significance of the objects found in the Egyptian pyramids have the slightest idea what they're talking about, or who has ever browsed a museum gift shop, will get a huge kick out of this book.
Araath
This should be required reading for every archeology student, this is a very very funny look at ruins. We still use a lot of the terms from here such as 'sacred point', 'sacred urn' and the 'plant that would not die'.... great fun. Lots of illustrations as you would find in a field journal.
felt boot
Macaulay's Motel of the Mysteries is a classic, hilarious send-up of archaeological investigation and interpretation, in which anything we don't understand is interpreted as having had religious significance. Written in the same style as old National Geographic articles (especially the classic coverage of Howard Carter's opening of Tutankhamen's tomb), it presents a comically garbled interpretation of a 20th Century motel that is excavated centuries later, only to be mis-interpreted as a tomb complex. The misunderstanding of toilet seats and sanitation tags (a la old Holiday Inns), complete with impressive but ridiculous artistic recreations of their ancient ceremonial use, is especially funny. Anyone who has ever studied archaeology should be able to appreciate (and be cautioned by) Macaulay's story.
Xanzay
I love this book. It is out of print and increasingly more difficult to find which is why I wasn't terribly upset when one or two pages were detached and loose in the book.

The book offers a humorous approach to archeology,and parodies, amongst other things, the discovery of King Tutankamun's tomb.

The tale covers the detailed work of an amateur archeologist in the future who attempts to piece together 20th century life in the USA based on uncovering the ruins of old highway motel.
I loved this book as a kid and was looking forward to sharing it with my kids. Unfortunately, I think it's a little dated and so the "joke" did not resonate as well. I'd recommend other books from Macaulay, instead. I wish he did an update!