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by Leon Chai
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History & Criticism
  • Author:
    Leon Chai
  • ISBN:
    0801883962
  • ISBN13:
    978-0801883965
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Johns Hopkins University Press; y First edition edition (July 31, 2006)
  • Pages:
    304 pages
  • Subcategory:
    History & Criticism
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    1898 kb
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Leon Chai sees in the Romantic age a significant movement across several broad fields of intellectual endeavor, from theoretical concepts to an. .Chai begins with P. B. Shelley on the need for conceptual framework, or theory.

Leon Chai sees in the Romantic age a significant movement across several broad fields of intellectual endeavor, from theoretical concepts to an attempt to understand how they arise. He contends that this movement led to a spatial treatment of concepts, the primacy of development over concepts, and the creation of metatheory, or the formal analysis of theory. He then considers how Friedrich Wolf and Friedrich Schlegel shift from a preoccupation with antiquity to a heightened self-awareness of Romantic nostalgia for.

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Romantic Theory: Forms of Reflexivity in the Revolutionary Era. Leon Chai. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 2006. oceedings{Fry2008RomanticTF, title {Romantic Theory: Forms of Reflexivity in the Revolutionary Era. H. Fry}, year {2008} }.

Chicago Distribution Center. The Wordsworth Circle. Unfettering Poetry: Fancy in British Romanticism. Romantic Theory: Forms of Reflexivity in the Revolutionary Era.

Conservative writers abandoned revolutionary ideas, turned their attention to nature and to the simple problems of life. The move marked the beginning of a close and enduring friendship between the poets. They tried to avoid the contradictions, which were becoming so great in all the spheres of social life. In the ensuing period they collaborated on a book of poems entitled Lyrical Ballads, first published in 1798. This work is generally taken to mark the beginning of the romantic movement in English poetry. Wordsworth wrote almost all the poems in the volume, including the memorable "Tintern Abbey"; Coleridge contributed the famous "Rime of the Ancient Mariner.

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Leon Chai sees within the Romantic age an important circulation throughout numerous wide fields of highbrow . He reveals an analogous reflexivity in Napoleon's conflict plan at Jena and, consequently, in Hegel's stream from substance to topic.

Chai starts off with P. Shelley at the desire for conceptual framework, or conception.

Saved in: Main Author: Chai, Leon.

Other Authors: EBSCO Publishing (Firm). The romantic theory of the novel genre and reflection in Cervantes, Melville, Flaubert, Joyce, and Kafka, by: Parlej, Piotr, 1959- Published: (1997). Natural supernaturalism: tradition and revolution in romantic literature by: Abrams, M. 1912- Published: (1973).

This original study explores the new idea of theory that emerged in the wake of the French Revolution. Leon Chai sees in the Romantic age a significant movement across several broad fields of intellectual endeavor, from theoretical concepts to an attempt to understand how they arise. He contends that this movement led to a spatial treatment of concepts, the primacy of development over concepts, and the creation of metatheory, or the formal analysis of theory.

Chai begins with P. B. Shelley on the need for conceptual framework, or theory. He then considers how Friedrich Wolf and Friedrich Schlegel shift from a preoccupation with antiquity to a heightened self-awareness of Romantic nostalgia for that lost past. He finds a similar reflexivity in Napoleon's battle plan at Jena and, subsequently, in Hegel's move from substance to subject. Chai then turns to the sciences: Xavier Bichat's rejection of the idea of a unitary vital principle for life as process; the chemical theory of matter developed by Humphry Davy; and the work of Évariste Galois, whose proof of the solvability of equations using radicals ushered in the age of metatheory.

Chai concludes with reactions to theory: Coleridge's proposal of the conflict between reason and understanding as a model of theory, Mary Shelley's effort to replace theory with a different kind of relationship to external others, and Hölderlin's reflection on the limits of representation and the possibility of fulfillment beyond it.