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Download Shanks Mare: Japan's Great Comic Novel of Travel & Ribaldry fb2

by Ikku Jippensha,Sadakazu Shigeta,Thomas Satchell
Download Shanks Mare: Japan's Great Comic Novel of Travel & Ribaldry fb2
History & Criticism
  • Author:
    Ikku Jippensha,Sadakazu Shigeta,Thomas Satchell
  • ISBN:
    0804815801
  • ISBN13:
    978-0804815802
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Tuttle Pub (June 1, 2001)
  • Pages:
    416 pages
  • Subcategory:
    History & Criticism
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1128 kb
  • ePUB format
    1524 kb
  • DJVU format
    1829 kb
  • Rating:
    4.3
  • Votes:
    527
  • Formats:
    doc mbr txt rtf


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Hizakurige or Shank's Mare: Japan's Great Comic Novel of Travel and Ribaldry by Ikku Jippensha. Translated by Thomas Satchell. Rutland, Vermont: Charles E. Tuttle Company. Footing It Along the Tōkaidō (東海道中膝栗毛, tōkaidōchū hizakurige). 1 2 Translator's Preface to Hizakurige.

An outstanding comic novel. com User, September 9, 2001

An outstanding comic novel. com User, September 9, 2001. Students of Japanese literature will find Ikku Jippensha's Shank's Mare to be an outstanding comic novel and essential to a thorough study of Japanese literary history and culture: Thomas Satchell provides the English translation of this story of adventure and discovery. The original was issued serially in 1802: this will appeal to modern readers.

We’re dedicated to reader privacy so we never track you. a b Translator's Preface to Hizakurige. A firecracker (cracker, noise maker, banger, or bunger) is a small explosive device primarily designed to produce a large amount of noise, especially in the form of a loud bang; any visual effect is i. Osaka. Osaka (Japanese: 大阪市, Hepburn: Ōsaka-shi, pronounced ; commonly just 大阪, Ōsaka ( listen )) is a designated city in the Kansai region of Japan.

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by Ikku Jippensha (Author), Thomas Satchell (Translator). Totally entertaining. I had not previously know where the expression, "Shank's Mare" originated. An outstanding comic novel and essential to a thorough understanding of Japanese literary history and culture.

From dust jacket flap: This celebrated comic Japanese novel is a lusty tale of two amiable scoundrels, Yajirobei and . This is the kind of book that could have had ten 500 page volumes of different adventures with Yaji and Kita, but unfortunately all we have is this one small book.

From dust jacket flap: This celebrated comic Japanese novel is a lusty tale of two amiable scoundrels, Yajirobei and Kitahachi, and their disreputable doings. It is a madcap chronicle of adventure and misadventure along the great highway leading from Tokyo (then called Edo) to Kyoto. Its original title is a humorous word meaning "a journey on foot," and it is therefore appropriate that this translation by Thomas Satchell should be called "Shanks' Mare". You really dont want it to be over when it ends.

Shank's Mare : Being a Translation of the Tokaido Volumes of Hizakurige, Japan's Great Comic Novel of Travel & Ribaldry. Published by Charles E. Tuttle.

Shank's Mare (Hizakurige) follows two amiable scoundrels, Yajirobei and Kitahachi, on a madcap journey of adventure and misadventure along the great highway leading from Tokyo to Kyoto. The lusty tale of their disreputable doings is Japan's most celebrated comic novel. Issued serially in 1802, Hizakurige was a tremendous success both with readers of its own time and with later generations. The book's earthy humor typifies the brash and devil-may-care attitude of the residents of Tokyo, both then and now.

Kaghma
I would rate this review more highly if the quality of the conversion to an e-book was better. The e-book is full of transcription errors. For example, on page 71 the first two sentences are repeated. There's a lot of words elsewhere which are incorrectly transcribed. I doubt that anyone actually read the e-book to check it after using OCR to create it. Given the poor quality of the conversion, I would advise against buying it; get a second hand paper copy instead. The story itself is a gem, however! The English is very old-fashioned. The original translation appears to have been published in 1960, but the language in the translation looks like UK English from around 1930 (edit:the introduction states that it was first published by subscription in 1929 in Kobe). The story itself is a fascinating window into the life of a traveller in Edo period Japan. Quite a lot of the humour is lost in translation, or actually lost in the old fashioned English, but it's still fun and educational to read.
Peles
Even if you find "The Tale of Genji" hard to read at times (I do, I admit) "Shank's Mare" is proof that not all old Japanese books are difficult for western readers to enjoy. It does help if you already have some understanding of the people and culture, but I think this title is proof that humor really can be a universal language. Broad, slap-sticky fun.
Gamba
I loved this book.
Totally entertaining.
I had not previously know where the expression, "Shank's Mare" originated.
A fun read. Hard to put it down.
Alianyau
I have only just started reading this book and I'm haveing alot of trouble finding the houmor in the book. And also I can't really tell what is going on in the story. The plot seems to be choppy and I can't get a mental picture as to what is going on half the time. But I can not bash the book untill I'm done reading it. I hope things start to smooth out the more I read it and get a feel for the style of the book.
Kulalbine
This book is over 200 years old and still popular. There's a good reason for that.

It captures all that people love about slapstick, and doesn't worry about toning it down for the kids. The two heros drift from town to town, bordello to bordello, and bar to bar. They're petty grifters, always trying to pull another meager scam, and always getting the worst of it in the end.

There's no real plot here, just a sequence of vignettes. They're all like enough in kind to create a rhythm, but different enough to stay entertaining. Lots of the humor is low - potty humor, not restricted just to human waste. As in some britcoms, our heroes suddenly appear in their underwear time and again - or out of it, or next to it, or looking up into a tree at it. The real fun is in their silly pranks and exaggerations, always found out in ways that make them look like total twits.

Ikku Jippensha's work is still a good read, even today. Sometimes, though, English doesn't capture the flavor of the original. The translator just shouldn't have bothered with some of the puns, and a few turns of phrase probably sounded better back when this was translated. End-notes are scanty, and there appears to be a systematic error in page number references towards the end of the notes.

None of that really interferes with a good read. Enjoy the prat-falls as much as the original readers did, 200 years ago and in Japan.

//wiredweird