» » Statius: Roman History, Volume III: Books 36-40 (Loeb Classical Library)

Download Statius: Roman History, Volume III: Books 36-40 (Loeb Classical Library) fb2

by Earnest Cary,Herbert B. Foster,Dio Cassius
Download Statius: Roman History, Volume III: Books 36-40 (Loeb Classical Library) fb2
History & Criticism
  • Author:
    Earnest Cary,Herbert B. Foster,Dio Cassius
  • ISBN:
    0674990595
  • ISBN13:
    978-0674990593
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Harvard University Press (January 1, 1914)
  • Pages:
    528 pages
  • Subcategory:
    History & Criticism
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1842 kb
  • ePUB format
    1430 kb
  • DJVU format
    1253 kb
  • Rating:
    4.2
  • Votes:
    623
  • Formats:
    azw lrf docx lit


The Great Library for all. The Internet Archive is a bargain, but we need your help. All we need is the price of a paperback book to sustain a non-profit library the whole world depends on.

The Great Library for all. We’re dedicated to reader privacy.

Of the eighty books of Dio's great work Roman History, covering the era from the legendary landing of. .Translated by Earnest Cary, Herbert B. Foster.

Of the eighty books of Dio's great work Roman History, covering the era from the legendary landing of Aeneas in Italy to the reign of Alexander Severus (222–235 CE), we possess Books 36–60 (36 and 55–60 have gaps), which cover the years 68 BCE–47 CE. The missing portions are partly supplied, for the earlier gaps by Zonaras, who relies closely on Dio, and for some later gaps (Book 35 onwards) by John Xiphilinus (of the eleventh century). There are also many excerpts. Loeb Classical Library 53. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 1914.

Temporarily out of stock. Dio was a senator in the early third century who wrote a history from the beginning of Rome through to his own times. His last political position was that of consul under Alexander Severus. Apart from that there's pretty much nothing known of Dio's life.

Dio Cassius (Cassius Dio), c. 150-235 CE, was born in Bithynia. Roman History, Volume III. Books 36-40. Translated by Earnest Cary. With Herbert B. Little of his Roman History survives, but missing portions are partly supplied from elsewhere and there are many excerpts. Dio's work is a vital source for the last years of the Roman republic and the first four Roman emperors.

Roman History, Volume 3 of 9 book. Jan 03, 2015 Nicholas Fritz rated it liked it. So far each of the the books has gotten better. If you enjoy reading older histories, this is an easy book.

This webpage reproduces a Book of Roman History by Cassius Dio published in Vol. VI of the Loeb Classical Library . Cassius Dio Roman History

The text is in the public domain. This text has not yet been proofread. If you find a mistake though, please let me know! next: Book LIV. Cassius Dio Roman History. Vol. VI p193 Book LIII

Of the eighty books of Dio's great work Roman History, covering the era from the legendary landing of Aeneas in Italy . About the Author: Earnest Cary (b. 1879) taught classics at Harvard and Princeton.

L053) Roman History: Volume III. Books 36–40. L066) Roman History: Volume IV. Books 41–45.

The listings of Loeb volumes at online bookstores and library catalogues vary considerably and are often best navigated via ISBN numbers. L053) Roman History: Volume III. L082) Roman History: Volume V. Books 46–50. L083) Roman History: Volume VI. Books 51–55.

The Loeb Classical Library® is the only series of books which, through original . R. Shackleton Bailey. Dio Cassius,Earnest Cary,Herbert B.

Epic and lyric poetry; tragedy and comedy; history, travel, philosophy. Of the eighty books of Dio's great work, Books 36-60 have come down to us (with some gaps).

Coupon

Braswyn
I am enjoying this book a good deal. I have been acquiring every ancient text with a view on getting all the information I can find on Julius Caesar and this was one of the last texts I needed, will also be buying Volume IV. Dio presents a good history, but not very detail oriented. Comparing it to other histories his info seems pretty accurate but he gives a lot of general descriptions. Other authors are preferred for details of specific scenes. For instance Dio's description of the Catilinarian conspiracy, while good and easy to follow is no where near Sallust. But this is simply because Dio chose to cover a wide time period of history and could not focus overly on specific events. If you into Roman history this is something you should have in your library.
Corgustari
In Book 37, section 18, Cassius Dio writes about a musical derivation of the Days of the Week.

Although he alludes to the Egyptians, this Harmonic Week points to the Pythagoreans. Since Pythagoras spent many years in Egypt, that could be the source for this allusion.
mr.Mine
Since there are so many of these darn things the review shall be divided into three sections. First, a brief description of the Loeb series of books and their advantages/disadvantages. Second shall be my thoughts on the author himself, his accuracy, as well as his style and the style of his translator. This is of course only my opinion and should be treated as such. The final part shall review what this particular book actually covers.

The Loeb series date back to the turn of the last century. They are designed for people with at least some knowledge of Greek or Latin. They are a sort of compromise between a straight English translation and an annotated copy of the original text. On the left page is printed the text in Greek or Latin depending on the language of the writer and on the right side is the text in English. For somebody who knows even a little Greek or Latin these texts are invaluable. You can try to read the text in the original language knowing that you can correct yourself by looking on the next page or you can read the text in translation and check the translation with the original for more detail. While some of the translations are excellent mostly they are merely serviceable since they are designed more as an aid to translation rather than a translation in themselves. Most of them follow the Greek or Latin very closely. These books are also very small, maybe just over a quarter the size of your average hardcover book. This means that you'll need to buy more than just one book to read a complete work. They are also somewhat pricey considering their size. The Loeb Collection is very large but most of the more famous works can be found in better (and cheaper) translations elsewhere. If you want to read a rarer book or read one in the original language then you can't do better than the Loeb Editions.

Cassius Dio's History is available in nine books in the Loeb series. Dio was a senator in the early third century who wrote a history from the beginning of Rome through to his own times. His last political position was that of consul under Alexander Severus. Apart from that there's pretty much nothing known of Dio's life. For the second and third century his is the biggest voice. For the first century AD his work fills in a lot of the gaps left by the fragmented state of Tacitus. For the late Republican and early Imperial period his work survives mostly intact and offers the best continuous narrative we have. All of his earlier stuff is rubbish. There are many problems with his work. To start with the most obvious, his work is mostly lost. The portions that survive are fragmented or epitomes of his actual work. The main epitomators are Zonaras and John Xiphilinus, who wrote in the 11th and 12th Century. The only section that survived relatively intact is the part dealing with the later Republic. Obviously this is a problem when dealing with an ancient author since you don't know what details his epitomator misunderstood or left out. The other major problem is his vagueness. Unlike earlier historians (all of whom covered a smaller period) Dio is not as precise as might be liked, often including phrases like "a few years later" or "a great many." This is a problem common with a lot of later historians. So much history is based off Dio that it is scary how little of his actual words survive. Another source that offers a good narrative of the Roman Civil War is Appian (Volume I,Volume II,Volume III,Volume IV). Also useful are Caesar's Gallic War,Civil Wars,Alexandrian, African, and Spanish Wars.

This volume covers the years 69-50 BC. Finally we are reading actual Dio and not merely some epitomator's idea of what Dio said. This is the period of the first triumvirate and Caesar's rise to power, as well as the beginning of the Civil War.