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by Andrew Stott
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History & Criticism
  • Author:
    Andrew Stott
  • ISBN:
    0415299330
  • ISBN13:
    978-0415299336
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Routledge; 1 edition (December 18, 2004)
  • Pages:
    176 pages
  • Subcategory:
    History & Criticism
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1593 kb
  • ePUB format
    1857 kb
  • DJVU format
    1311 kb
  • Rating:
    4.9
  • Votes:
    309
  • Formats:
    lit rtf doc docx


Literature, the latest volume in the highly successful New Critical Idiom series, is at once a compact mine of information . It also traces its dismantling from the late-60s onward. Finally, the book attemps to recuperate a notion of "the literary" by way of a series of readings of diverse texts.

It also traces its dismantling from the late-60s onward.

What is comedy? Andrew Stott tackles this question through an investigation of comic forms, theories and techniques, tracing the historical definitions of comedy.

The New Critical Idiom is an invaluable series of introductory guides designed to meet the needs of today's students grappling with the complexities of modern critical terminology. Each book in the series provides

The New Critical Idiom is an invaluable series of introductory guides designed to meet the needs of today's students grappling with the complexities of modern critical terminology. Each book in the series provides: A clear, explanatory guide to the use (and abuse) of the term.

Series: The New Critical Idiom. Paperback: 176 pages. Highly recommended too for writers of comedy who want to leverage a way of thinking about various approaches to comedy creation without all the lame rhetoric and packaging of "how to write comedy" guides. 16 people found this helpful.

Items related to Comedy (The New Critical Idiom). Home Andrew Stott Comedy (The New Critical Idiom). new chapters on Women in Comedy and Race and Ethnicity.

What is comedy? Andrew Stott tackles this question through an investigation of comic forms, theories and techniques, tracing the historical definitions of comedy from Aristotle to. .Comedy (The New Critical Idiom).

What is comedy? Andrew Stott tackles this question through an investigation of comic forms, theories and techniques, tracing the historical definitions of comedy from Aristotle to Chris Morris's Brass Eye via Wilde and Hancock.

COMEDY Andrew Stott NEW YORK AND LONDON First published 2005 by Routledge . 2005 Andrew Stott All rights reserved (The new critical idiom) Includes bibliographical references and index.

To purchase your own copy of this or any of Taylor & Francis or Routledge’s collection of thousands of eBooks please go to ww. Bookstore.

What is comedy? Andrew Stott tackles this question through an investigation of comic forms, theories and techniques, tracing the historical definitions of comedy from Aristotle to Chris Morris's Brass Eye via Wilde and Hancock. Rather than attempting to produce a totalising definition of 'the comic', this volume focuses on the significance of comic 'events' through study of various theoretical methodologies, including deconstruction, psychoanalysis and gender theory, and provides case studies of a number of themes, ranging from the drag act to the simplicity of slipping on a banana skin.

Fomand
First of all, I should mention that I have a very specific reason for loving this book: I teach a course in Comparative Literature called Comic Spirit at a public university in CA, and after trying many of the available critical/theoretical/philosophical texts on the subject of comedy and humor, I've found this to be the best by far.

Stott's essays blend interesting discussions of the work of major philosophers/theorists on comedy/humor (Bergson, Freud, Erasmus, etc.) with close readings of major comedic texts.

I have two light critiques:

1.) the book lacks truly global perspective, and focuses largely on Anglo-Euro-American traditions. This reflects my interests and goals in teaching, so this is not a shortcoming so much as my personal desire to see a broader perspective (of course, it can be said that the book is limited in length and therefore scope).

2.) the film/media examples are limited to "classics" (think: Charlie Chaplin, Monty Python, Mel Brooks, Billy Wilder, Woody Allen, etc.), which are fantastic and give the book a feeling of authority, a mature distance from the baggy monstrosity and wild diversity of contemporary comedy film. That said, if you're looking for something to connect to contemporary film/media studies (and hence pique student interest by engaging their predispositions, if you're teaching), you would need to fill in some gaps.

That said, after much trial-and-error, this is the book I return to for accessible writing style, broad coverage of what is becoming the critical canon of comedy thinkers, and clear exploration of challenging theories.

Highly recommended too for writers of comedy who want to leverage a way of thinking about various approaches to comedy creation without all the lame rhetoric and packaging of "how to write comedy" guides.
Androrim
It's really hard to find decent critical books on comedy as they're either too specific or subscribe to just one theory. This one, however, is wide-ranging, up-to-date and smart and full of examples from tv and movies. It's got historical background, explains a ton of stuff and uses modern theories really well.