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by David C. Downing
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History & Criticism
  • Author:
    David C. Downing
  • ISBN:
    083083284X
  • ISBN13:
    978-0830832842
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    IVP Books; PRINT-ON-DEMAND edition (May 21, 2005)
  • Pages:
    207 pages
  • Subcategory:
    History & Criticism
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1288 kb
  • ePUB format
    1368 kb
  • DJVU format
    1321 kb
  • Rating:
    4.8
  • Votes:
    432
  • Formats:
    doc rtf lit txt


Downing's command of the body of Lewis's work is also impressive. He can highlight how major themes come through in his fiction and nonfiction. He can cover centuries of ideas and find Great book. Lewis in such high regard that I've taken to believing that his ideas sprang straight from his massive intellect and fell perfectly polished onto the page for the page. This author dug into the roots of Jack's ideas, actually seeing the passages he underlined and the evolution of his ideas. Jul 10, 2013 Gene Coatney rated it it was amazing.

Includes bibliographical references (p. -200) and indexes Donor challen.

In this book David C. Downing explores the breadth of Lewis's writing, introducing us to Christian mysticism as Lewis knew it and to the contemplative writers who most influenced him. Though he showed a lifelong interest in mysticism, Lewis was not an uncritical admirer. As Downing highlights, Lewis had areas of concern and points of departure with some mystical thought.

In this artfully written analysis, Downing explores Lewis's insights on Christian mysticism and shows how they can safeguard today's believers from false phenomena even as they affirm God's mysterious grandeur and draw us--as Lewis put it--Into the Region of Awe. 207 pages, hardcover from InterVarsity. Into the Region of Awe: Mysticism in . Lewis (9780830832842) by David C. Downing.

Downing's survey of these books makes me want to return and read them again. As you might expect from such a rigorous thinker, Lewis didn't swallow all forms of Christian mysticism uncritically. Fortunately, he was able to avoid the stifling skepticism that so often plagues intellectuals

Downing's survey of these books makes me want to return and read them again. Fortunately, he was able to avoid the stifling skepticism that so often plagues intellectuals. StephenBarkley, October 31, 2014.

Into the Region of Awe: Mysticism in C. S. Lewis. The Most Reluctant Convert is a book that any person who has even a marginal interest in . Lewis, the Christian, will want to read. The author's writing style is pleasantly sophisticated without being stiff; poetic and yet practical. In short, it's a very enjoyable read (something about the style was so fluid and beautiful). I've read nearly all of CS Lewis's books in the last two months and have loved every minute of it.

In this book, David C. Downing explores the breadth of Lewis' writing, introducing us to the context of Christian mysticism in. . Downing explores the breadth of Lewis' writing, introducing us to the context of Christian mysticism in Lewis' day and to the writers who most influenced him. Lewis' critique of mysticism is instructive to us in this day of eclectic religious thought. Exploring Lewis' sense of the mystical can help us safeguard ourselves from false mysticism, even as it opens the way to a full experience of God's presence.

David C. Downing, Into the Region of Awe: Mysticism in C. David C. Downing, Planets in Peril: A Critical Study of C. Lewis's Ransom Trilogy. Downing, Into the Wardrobe: C. Lewis and the Narnia Chronicles. Downing, The Most Reluctant Convert: C. Lewis's Journey to Faith. University of Massachusetts Press, 1992. Colin Duriez and David Porter, The Inklings Handbook: The Lives, Thought and Writings of C. Lewis, J. R. Tolkien, Charles Williams, Owen Barfield, and Their Friends. 2001, ISBN 1-902694-13-9. Genres: Religion & Spirituality . Religious Studies. Downing explores the breadth of Lewis' writing, introducing us to the context .

C. S. Lewis is generally thought of as a commonsense Christian, one who offers theology that is understandable and morality that is practical. And yet, when writing about Narnia to a class of fifth graders who asked if it were possible to visit Aslan's country, Lewis replied that the only way he knew of was through death but then added this curious qualifier: "Perhaps some very good people get just a tiny glimpse before then." This simple sentence suggests a side of Lewis that most commentators have overlooked. If one takes another look at Lewis, one can find a sense of the mystical all through his writings, from his memoir Surprised by Joy to Perelandra, from his nonfiction essays to his Narnia stories. In this book David C. Downing explores the breadth of Lewis's writing, introducing us to Christian mysticism as Lewis knew it and to the contemplative writers who most influenced him. Though he showed a lifelong interest in mysticism, Lewis was not an uncritical admirer. As Downing highlights, Lewis had areas of concern and points of departure with some mystical thought. Lewis's comments about misguided forms mysticism are especially pertinent in our own era of faddish or eclectic religious thought. Exploring Lewis's sense of the mystical can help us safeguard ourselves from false mysticisms even as it opens the way to a deep and full experience of God's very presence with us. In the end we too may find ourselves drawn--as Lewis put it--"into the region of awe."

Mozel
I got this in audio format through my local library and then had to buy a hardcopy. I'm now listening to the audio again while I wait for the book to arrive. I agree with other reviewers that a reader who is familiar with Lewis's Space Trilogy and Narnia chronicles will get more out of this book. For someone with an interest in mysticism but little/no knowledge of Lewis, some chapters of this book might be boring and hard to follow. I have read just about all the Lewis I can get my hands on and am always on the lookout for serious in-depth discussions of his work and especially his less popular works such as the Space Trilogy and Till We All Have Faces.
The pleasant surprise for me in this book was the coverage of mysticism as a whole- it's characteristics, meaning, and examples in history. I have only a nodding acquaintance with mysticism and found the discussion of mysticism itself quite welcome.
I ordered the hard copy because of the numerous references to the writers who influenced Lewis. I was listening while driving and couldn't write down all the titles and authors I wanted to look into further. The research in the book seems solid and it both supported the thesis presented and offered me some new avenues of exploration. Highly recommend to anyone interested in both mysticism and Lewis.
HelloBoB:D
Quite possibly the very best book I have ever read on the relationship between "Jack", as his friends called him, and the idea of mysticism. Downing displays a wide appreciation both for the man and for his work. Reading this book gives the reader a bird's eye glimpse into the mind of Lewis. What was it about Lewis that made him unique among men? Was he a mystic or did he simply possess mystical tendencies? Was he first and foremost an intellectual, with all that that term allows, or did he lean toward a more touchy-feely version of Christianity? I first purchased this book as an audio book but was so impressed with what I was hearing that I knew I needed to be able to read and underline, so I bought the hard copy. Well worth the money! Highly recommend.
greatest
Into the Region of Awe is a very unique book because it is really about the views of two mature saints - C.S. Lewis and David Downing. David and "Jack" would have been close friends had they been contemporaries. While Downing traverses the expanse of Mysticism ("personal encounters with the divine") by way of references to the subject in C.S. Lewis's works, what is covered in Into the Region of Awe is far more than an examination of C.S. Lewis thoughts about mysticism and how certain mystics influenced Lewis's personal theology. This book is as much about what David Downing has learned about the subject and how C.S. Lewis inspired thinkers like David. This book, therefore, is a reference book for today's "spiritual traveler". I've only read it once but will come back to it soon (and likely, again and again). The second time I take it up, I'll have a set of index cards sitting next to me so I can take plenty of notes. The paths this book can take a seeker down are, I think, endless. If the chapters on the Space Trilogy and The Narnia Chronicles get a bit tedious (if you're like me and haven't yet read all of those works), read on. Those chapters are sandwiched in between more general chapters that are quite rich. The last few pages in the book are pure gold. The depth of the theological knowledge and the authenticity of the spiritual experiences of both C.S. Lewis and David Downing are obvious in this book, and their combined insights are very instructional for contemporary readers.
komandante
This author does a great job of examining many of Lewis's writings to reveal
his mystical perspective on walking with the Lord. Very helpful
Xwnaydan
Downing's concise study provides a sufficient orientation for nonspecialist readers vis-a-vis mysticism and mystical experience in the Western Christian tradition. His command of Lewis's writings is secure, and his discussion of mystical themes in the space trilogy and the Narnian chronicles is appropriate.