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by Ming Dong Gu
Download Chinese Theories of Fiction: A Non-Western Narrative System (SUNY series in Chinese Philosophy and Culture) fb2
History & Criticism
  • Author:
    Ming Dong Gu
  • ISBN:
    079146816X
  • ISBN13:
    978-0791468166
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    SUNY Press (June 1, 2007)
  • Pages:
    302 pages
  • Subcategory:
    History & Criticism
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1152 kb
  • ePUB format
    1463 kb
  • DJVU format
    1794 kb
  • Rating:
    4.6
  • Votes:
    194
  • Formats:
    mobi lrf rtf doc


Ming Dong Gu is Associate Professor of Chinese and Comparative .

Ming Dong Gu is Associate Professor of Chinese and Comparative Literature and Director of the Confucius Institute at the University of Texas, Dallas. He is the author of Chinese Theories of Reading and Writing: A Route to Hermeneutics and Open Poetics, also published by SUNY Press. Series: SUNY Series in Chinese Philosophy and Culture (Paperback). Paperback: 304 pages. Publisher: State University of New York Press (June 1, 2007). That Gu's book has any dialogue with the Western canon at all is not an attempt at subversion, but rather a gesture towards the flexibility of Chinese scholarship.

Aesthetics: Crash Course Philosophy - Продолжительность: 10:38 CrashCourse Recommended for you. 10:38. Трагедия русского чуда - Т-4 Сотка.

Chinese Theories of Fiction book. Chinese Theories of Fiction: A Non-Western Narrative System (Suny Series in Chinese Philosophy and Culture). 079146816X (ISBN13: 9780791468166).

Ming Dong Gu. In this innovative work, Ming Dong Gu examines Chinese literature and traditional Chinese criticism to construct a distinctly Chinese theory of fiction and places it within the context of international fiction theory

Ming Dong Gu. In this innovative work, Ming Dong Gu examines Chinese literature and traditional Chinese criticism to construct a distinctly Chinese theory of fiction and places it within the context of international fiction theory.

181. Toward a Transcultural Theory of Fiction Chinese Theories of Fiction. 0791481484, 9780791481486. Toward a Transcultural Theory of Fiction. Chinese Theories of Fiction: A Non-Western Narrative System Ming Dong Gu Esikatselu ei käytettävissä - 2006. Chinese Theories of Fiction: A Non-Western Narrative System Ming Dong Gu Esikatselu ei käytettävissä - 2007. Yleiset termit ja lausekkeet. Chinese Theories of Fiction.

China Knowledge Series. Chinese Theories of Fiction: A Non-Western Narrative System. Albany: State University of New York Press. The coverage extends from early myths and legends through the zhiguai stories of the Six Dynasties, the chuanqi stories of the Tang and Song dynasties, the vernacular stories of the following dynasties, and late Qing novels.

Chinese Theories of Fiction: A Non-Western Narrative System. By Ming Dong Gu. pp. 286. Albany, State University of New York Press, 2006. Published online by Cambridge University Press: 01 April 2008. Export citation Request permission.

Chinese philosophy is the intellectual tradition of the Chinese culture from their early . Ancient History Encyclopedia Foundation is a non-profit organization.

Chinese philosophy is the intellectual tradition of the Chinese culture from their early recorded history to the present day. The main topics of Chinese. The humanistic emphasis in Chinese philosophy is largely owed to the enormous influence of Confucianism. During most of Chinese history, Confucianism was seen as the preserver of traditional Chinese values and the guardian of Chinese civilization as such.

What is the role of Chinese theories of fiction in a globalized world? .

What is the role of Chinese theories of fiction in a globalized world? Is there something wrong with Western paradigms unable to fully accommodate Chinese literary experience? . I will try to answer these questions through discussing Chinese theories of fiction, in ancient and modern times, in the context of influential theories of fiction in the West: Gregory Currie’s The Nature of Fiction, Kendall Walton’s Mimesis and Make-Believe, and, in addition, to Gu Ming Dong’s Chinese Theories of Fiction: A Non-Western Narrative System.

A Non-Western Narrative System, New York 2006, p. 71. 120 nlr 52 novel occurred in the late nineteenth century, with a delay of almost three hundred years. 14 Why? V For Pomeranz, one reason for the great divergence was that in eighteenthcentury Europe ‘the wheels of fashion were spinning faster’,15 stimulating consumption, and through it the economy as a whole; while in China, after the consolidation of the Qing dynasty, consumption ‘as a motor of change’ came to a halt for over a century, TERM Fall '13. PROFESSOR Bartolotta

An ambitious, innovative work that proposes a distinctly Chinese theory of fiction.

Itiannta
I tried teaching some short stories by Mo Yan for the first time in an undergraduate non-Western literatures course, and this book was very helpful. The stories show people responding to the industrial changes of "The Great Leap Forward" with hallucinations that can be understood in relation to the wrenching changes and material conditions of the time. So it is so helpful to have some background from this text on forms of "realism" in Chinese fiction that tend to have a more lyrical, mythical, and psychological 'openness.' I really like how this text thinks about open fiction. Very interesting and helpful to faculty offering differing definitions of realism.
Nicearad
Typical approaches towards subverting the dominance of Western theory attempt direct attacks on the histories, perspectives, and ideas from Europe and the Americas, portraying them as epistemologically oppressive and dismissive of alternate voices.

Gu's argument subverts this dominance in a much more nuanced fashion. He articulates a transnational approach not by theory, but by example. Rather than simply arguing *against* Western dominance (indirectly asserting it through the very act of engagement), he instead reveals the presence of multiple centers for literature. Even amongst theories, multiple literary origins exist that do not originate geographically, historically, or culturally from the West; Gu's approach does well to distinguish between "literary theory" and "Western literary theory," which all too many scholars have taken as synonymous.

Gu's studies examine the complex and extensive genealogies of Chinese literature -- *and* of Chinese criticism -- as they shape and contest Chinese culture itself. In other words, _Chinese Theories of Fiction_ does not attempt to establish an East-West hybrid identity, but rather focuses on the nuanced yet rarely acknowledged hybridity inherent in the Chinese consciousness itself. This stance in the identity politics of literary studies emphasizes the obvious fact that Chinese literature is illuminating purely on its own grounds, and does not need to be compared or contrasted with the achievements of other cultures to receive merit. That Gu's book has any dialogue with the Western canon at all is not an attempt at subversion, but rather a gesture towards the flexibility of Chinese scholarship. Its ideas are not outlandish, esoteric, or absolute, but in fact translatable to any foreign culture, as it is continually transforming in its applicability and significance.

Chinese literature, and _CToF_ itself, is therefore not something to be decoded with finality for the consumption of a few; its ideas are not easy to forget or co-opt. Instead, Gu's argument reveals that Chinese literature has profound appeal for global audiences; its general significance far outlasts any geographical, historical, social, or any other boundaries readers might imagine.

_CToF_ is by far the most exciting thing I've read recently, and quite possibly one of the most important works I've read in 2008.