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by Alexandre Koyre
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History & Criticism
  • Author:
    Alexandre Koyre
  • ISBN:
    0801803470
  • ISBN13:
    978-0801803475
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Johns Hopkins University Press; 1st edition (January 10, 1968)
  • Pages:
    328 pages
  • Subcategory:
    History & Criticism
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1700 kb
  • ePUB format
    1722 kb
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    1223 kb
  • Rating:
    4.4
  • Votes:
    458
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of theological justification from closed world to infinite universe.

The Swerve: How the World Became Modern. Koyre considers the transference of earlier attributes of God - Absolute power & divine infinity, to the physical description of Newton's Absolute Space - the 'divinization of Space'! This transformation also revitalized the place of Mankind in the cosmos as 'Renaissance Humanism'.

Perhaps because it grew out of a Noguchi Lecture Koyre gave at Johns Hopkins in 1953. The book consists of twelve sections. For all but the final one, Koyre lists below the title a cast of the most important thinkers discussed. I. The Sky and the Heavens. The infinite Universe of the New Cosmology, infinite in Duration as well as in Extension, in which eternal matter in accordance with eternal and necessary laws moves endlessly and aimlessly in eternal space, inherited all the ontological attributes of the Divinity.

Alexandre Koyré interprets this revolution in terms of the change that occurred in our conception of the universe and our place in it. .Alexandre Koyré was a member of the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, and professor at the Ecole Pratique des Hautes Etudes in Paris.

Alexandre Koyré interprets this revolution in terms of the change that occurred in our conception of the universe and our place in it and shows the primacy of this change in the development of the modern world. His books include Discovering Plato and Newtonian Studies.

Koyré, Alexandre, 1892-1964. Baltimore, Johns Hopkins Press. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Trent University Library Donation. Internet Archive Books. Uploaded by station21. cebu on February 27, 2019.

Alexandre Koyré interprets this revolution in terms of the change that occurred in our conception of the universe and our place in it and shows the primacy of this change in the development of the modern world

Alexandre Koyré interprets this revolution in terms of the change that occurred in our conception of the universe and our place in it and shows the primacy of this change in the development of the modern world. During the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries a radical change occurred in the patterns and the framework of European thought.

Alexandre Koyré brilliantly interprets this revolution in terms of the change that occurred in our conception of the universe and our place in it, and illustrates the primacy . An important contribution to the study of 17th-century thought. Thomas S. Kuhn, Science).

Alexandre Koyré brilliantly interprets this revolution in terms of the change that occurred in our conception of the universe and our place in it, and illustrates the primacy of this change in the development of the modern world. Philosophical Quarterly). A model of scholarliness without pedantry, of clarity without oversimplification.

Professor Alexandre Koyre (author). Would you like to proceed to the App store to download the Waterstones App? Download Now. Dismiss. Hardback 322 Pages, Published: 31/05/2016. Usually dispatched within 3 weeks. Simply reserve online and pay at the counter when you collect.

His books include Discovering Plato and Newtonian Studies.

Up to the renaissance the world was thought to be bounded by a distant but finite sphere, the empyrean heaven, beyond which must be the realm of the divine

Up to the renaissance the world was thought to be bounded by a distant but finite sphere, the empyrean heaven, beyond which must be the realm of the divine.

During the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries a radical change occurred in the patterns and the framework of European thought. In the wake of discoveries through the telescope and Copernican theory, the notion of an ordered cosmos of "fixed stars" gave way to that of a universe infinite in both time and space―with significant and far-reaching consequences for human thought. Alexandre Koyré interprets this revolution in terms of the change that occurred in our conception of the universe and our place in it and shows the primacy of this change in the development of the modern world.


Mr_KiLLaURa
While the book itself is very good and very important in the history and philosophy of science, this edition is the absolute worst. I am convinced this "publisher" is breaking some sort of copyright law, as there is none of the standard information on the inside cover, and the layout is so bad that I was half convinced that I received the wrong book. I'm still not convinced I got the right one, and will be purchasing a different copy as soon as I can.

The text is almost devoid of formatting, up to and including a lack of indentation, improper spacing on block quotes, improperly sized illustrations, misplaced quotation marks, etc. It's like they had someone just retype the book into a Word document, then republished and resold it on the assumption that grad students like myself will see the cost reduction and take the bait.
OTANO
This is a fantastic book; unfortunately, this version is almost unreadable. There is no indentation or italicization, and quotation marks are often misplaced. This makes it awfully difficult to tell the lengthy quoted passages apart from the author's own text. Definitely read this book--just buy it from a different publisher.
Lbe
The digital edition is awful. It lacks all the figures (there are just descriptions of them), has almost no formatting, paragraphs are not indented or at least visually separated from each other. I have don't have the physical copy, so I can't compare these two. The content is great, I really do enjoy reading it, but I'm still considering returning it, because the format is so horrible.
Meztisho
A really valuable work in an age where the scientific community has evolved into a cult of extreme skepticism. Time to revisit premodern perspectives and understandings for a more holistic world view. Nicholas of Cusa may have had it right all along. We now know that spacetime is relative, the heliocentric model is based in the very assumptions that Einstein willingly or unwillingly uprooted.
Voodoogore
To get a true sense of the Copernican Revolution, it is necessary to understand both:
1) Christian Europe's theological transformations, primarily , from 1400 to 1517 (Protestant Reformation & Catholic response), to 1687
2) an astronomical paradigm shift as result of instruments, discoveries & theories, 1400 to 1687. Kepler, Tycho, Galileo, & Newton.

Koyre has done the hard part of Task 1 for the scholar / scientist / theologian. Koyre has meticulously laid out logically the competing arguments (by originator) for:

the medieval geo-centric closed world / Chain of Being (Scholastics, mostly),
early Renaissance's helio-centric closed world (1543, Copernicus) which undermined the divine Chain / divine right of Kingship, etc
the 17th century mathematically-exact, mechanical, infinite universe that resulted from the astronomy of Kepler, Tycho, Galileo, & Newton.

This theological transformation was a gradual shift from:

1) an infinite, omnipotent, transcendent Christian God that was WHOLLY different from finite Man & his cosmos
to
2) an immanent & infinite 'Deist clock-maker' God who expressed His infinite power through the 'plentitude' of an infinite universe.
Koyre considers the transference of earlier attributes of God -- Absolute power & divine infinity, to the physical description of Newton's Absolute Space -- the 'divinization of Space'! This transformation also revitalized the place of Mankind in the cosmos as 'Renaissance Humanism'.

These changes did not progress without the pain of inquisitions, self-exiles & house arrests, and the occasional martyr. Giordano Bruno was burned at the stake around 1600 for his heresy of an infinite, immanent God. As a priest, his infatuation with infinity was too close to the Church, and, too soon, lacking the support of Galileo & Newton's observations. Cardinal de Cusa, on the other hand, theologized an 'indeterminate cosmos' as a transition from Copernicus to infinite cosmologists and profoundly influenced the theological transformation from medieval to Renaissance.
I would recommend first reading The Sleepwalkers by Koestler, as a generalist summary of the astronomical paradigm shift. With this astronomical background, Koyre will be much easier to understand. Then try Kuhn, The Structure of Scientific Revolutions, which was deeply influenced by Koyre.
Vertokini
Of all the tomes I read during my years studying the history of science, this is the one I tend to come back to the most.

Koyre describes the thinking of such diverse figures as Giordano Bruno, Nicholas of Cusa, Galileo, Henry More, and Johannes Kepler regarding the possibility that the universe might be of unlimited extent. As such, the discussions, particularly early on, deal more with scholastic philosophy, with heavy emphasis on religious implications. They deal with abstract notions, and some of the thinking of these early figures is quite bold, startling even, and beautiful, after a fashion.

It is apropos to recall that science was long known as "natural philosophy"...and indeed, as the former figures give way to the analyses of Newton and Leibniz, we find Koyre's work limning the disentangling of these two threads, philosophy and science, at least with respect to cosmology.

In particular, Koyre underlines one of the most ironical developments in all the history of ideas at the very end of the book, in recounting how the triumph of Newtonian physics rendered superfluous the God that it had been Newton's purpose to honor through his science.

Not for everyone; but for me, magnificent.