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by C. Heffer
Download The Language of Jury Trial: A Corpus-Aided Analysis of Legal-Lay Discourse fb2
History & Criticism
  • Author:
    C. Heffer
  • ISBN:
    1403942471
  • ISBN13:
    978-1403942470
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Palgrave Macmillan (November 1, 2005)
  • Pages:
    253 pages
  • Subcategory:
    History & Criticism
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1705 kb
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    1371 kb
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    1266 kb
  • Rating:
    4.9
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    179
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Careful analyses of genres such as witness examination and the judge's.

Careful analyses of genres such as witness examination and the judge's summing-up reveal a strategic tension between a desire to persuade the jury and the need to conform to legal constraints

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Careful analyses of genres such as witness examination and the judge's summing-up reveal a. strategic tension between a desire to persuade the jury and the need to conform to legal constraints.

Careful analyses of genres such as witness examination and the judge's summing-up reveal a strategic tension between a desire to persuade the jury and the need to conform to legal constraints. Categories: Linguistics\Linguistics.

Author: Chris Heffer, Nottingham Trent University, UK Hardback: ISBN: 1403942471 Pages: 280 Price: .

Drawing on representative corpora of transcripts from over 100 English criminal jury trials, this stimulating new book explores the nature of 'legal-lay discourse', or the language used by legal professionals before lay juries. Careful analyses of genres such as witness examination and the judge's summing-up reveal a strategic tension between a desire to persuade the jury and the need to conform to legal constraints. The book also suggests ways of managing this tension linguistically to help, not hinder, the jury.