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by Betty S. Travitsky,Carole Levin,Cary J. Nederman,Constance Jordan,Deborah S. Ellis,Dennis Moore,Eileen Kearney,Janis Butler Holm,N. Elaine Lawson,Sara J. Eaton,Shirley F. Staton,Valerie Wayne
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History & Criticism
  • Author:
    Betty S. Travitsky,Carole Levin,Cary J. Nederman,Constance Jordan,Deborah S. Ellis,Dennis Moore,Eileen Kearney,Janis Butler Holm,N. Elaine Lawson,Sara J. Eaton,Shirley F. Staton,Valerie Wayne
  • ISBN:
    081431872X
  • ISBN13:
    978-0814318720
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Wayne State University Press (November 1, 1987)
  • Pages:
    264 pages
  • Subcategory:
    History & Criticism
  • Language:
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    4.2
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Elaine Lawson - Rereadings of Medieval and Renaissance literary texts.

Elaine Lawson - Rereadings of Medieval and Renaissance literary texts. Domestic treachery in the Clerk's tale, Deborah S. Ellis - Enid the disobedient: the Mabinogion's Gereint and Enid, Jeanie Watson - Communication short-circuited: ambiguity and motivation in the Heptameron, Karen F. Wiley - Reading Spenser's Faerie Queen - In a different voice, Shirley F. Staton - Role and representation in English Renaissance texts.

Wayne State University Press.

See a Problem? We’d love your help. Essays examine the experiences, accomplishments, and social roles of medieval and Renaissance women.

Women in the Middle Ages occupied a number of different social roles

Women in the Middle Ages occupied a number of different social roles. During the Middle Ages, a period of European history lasting from around the 5th century to the 15th century, women held the positions of wife, mother, peasant, artisan, and nun, as well as some important leadership roles, such as abbess or queen regnant. The very concept of "woman" changed in a number of ways during the Middle Ages and several forces influenced women's roles during their period.

This volume offers 18 essays on women as writers or as objects of representation in the English Renaissance. Josephine A. Roberts. By analyzing the ways in which women are treated both in the traditional canon and in writings hitherto excluded, the book establishes a broader context for the interpretation of these writings. At the same time, the essays treat texts as cultural documents that raise questions about English politics, religion, economics and power relations.

Janis Butler Holm, The Myth of a Feminist Humanism: Thomas Salter’s The Mirrhor of Modestie, in Ambiguous Realities: Women in the Middle Ages and Renaissance, e.

Janis Butler Holm, The Myth of a Feminist Humanism: Thomas Salter’s The Mirrhor of Modestie, in Ambiguous Realities: Women in the Middle Ages and Renaissance, ed. Carole Levin and Jeanie Watson (Detroit: Wayne State University Press, 1987), pp. 197–218. Betty S. Travitsky, Reprinting Tudor History: The Case of Catherine of Aragon, Renaissance Quarterly, 5. (1997), p. 16. rossRefGoogle Scholar. 23. Juan Luis Vives, De La Mujer Cristiana, in Obras Completas, ed.

Ambiguous Realities Women in the Middle Ages and Renaissance . .

Weller, Barry and Ferguson, Margaret . Elizabeth Cary, Lady Falkland, The Tragedy of Mariam, The Fair Queen of Jewry, with Lady Falkland, Her Life, University of California Press, 1994.

Women in guilds in the Late Middle Ages found less and less work as guilds began to deny them membership and . Further restrictions were placed on women even as society entered the more enlightened era of the Renaissance. Bibliography Related Content Books Cite This Work License.

Women in guilds in the Late Middle Ages found less and less work as guilds began to deny them membership and male co-workers made their lives more difficult. Women were still paid less than men and so it was more profitable overall for a shop to hire a female rather than a male.

The predominant cultural expectation for women in medieval and Renaissance Europe, as propagated and institutionalized by both the literate aristocracy and the medieval Church, was quite straightforward. The ideal woman was to be chaste and obedient, busy in the home and silent outside it. The Church provided two models for women: Mary, the Mother of God, and Eve, the temptress. The reality of women's lives, however, was richer and much more ambiguous. Women of all classes worked not only in the home but outside it as well. The further one reads the text of the time, the less uniformity one finds about the actual role of women.

Examining specific literary historical, and theological text, the essays in Ambiguous Realities illustrates a number of important issues about women in the Middle Ages and the Renaissance; the changes in attitude toward women, the role and status on women, the dichotomy between the public and private spheres, the prescriptions for women's behavior and the image of the ideal woman, and the difference between the perceived and the actual audience of medieval and Renaissance writers.