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by Paul E. Johnson
Download The Kingdom of Matthias: A Story of Sex and Salvation in 19th-Century America fb2
History & Criticism
  • Author:
    Paul E. Johnson
  • ISBN:
    0195098358
  • ISBN13:
    978-0195098358
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Oxford University Press, USA (August 3, 1995)
  • Pages:
    240 pages
  • Subcategory:
    History & Criticism
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1681 kb
  • ePUB format
    1568 kb
  • DJVU format
    1100 kb
  • Rating:
    4.4
  • Votes:
    555
  • Formats:
    lit mobi lit lrf


In their vivid book, Paul E. Johnson and Sean Wilentz open up a chilling vein of continuity in the American religious .

In their vivid book, Paul E. Johnson and Sean Wilentz open up a chilling vein of continuity in the American religious experience. A story of religious fanaticism and sexual scandal in the early days of the republic, The Kingdom of Matthias is a brilliant work of historical scholarship with disturbing contemporary implications. A beautifully written narrative that builds toward a stunning conclusion.

The Kingdom of Matthias" by Paul Johnson and Sean Wilentz is an extraordinary study in what happens when . This book had me hooked from the start. Although at times it reads like a soap opera it tells the true story of Robert Matthews also know the the prophet Matthias.

The Kingdom of Matthias" by Paul Johnson and Sean Wilentz is an extraordinary study in what happens when enthusiastic religion and mental illness combine in one individual to tip him and his followers over into the unhealthiness of a personality cult. The Prophet Matthias stands in a long line of deeply eccentric American religious figures whose stories are compelling and frightening, yet who remain on the fringe of American religious history.

In this book, the strange tale of Matthias the Prophet provides a fascinating window into the turbulent movements of the religious revival known as the Second Great Awakening-movements which swept up great numbers of evangelical Americans and gave rise to new sects like the Mormons

In this book, the strange tale of Matthias the Prophet provides a fascinating window into the turbulent movements of the religious revival known as the Second Great Awakening-movements which swept up great numbers of evangelical Americans and gave rise to new sects like the Mormons

This narrative history brings to life the spiritual and sexual tensions of mid-19th-century America through the sensational story of the cult of Matthias.

The Kingdom of Matthias: A Story of Sex and Salvation in 19th-Century America. This narrative history brings to life the spiritual and sexual tensions of mid-19th-century America through the sensational story of the cult of Matthias.

book by Paul E. Johnson.

In the hands of Johnson and Wilentz, the strange tale of Matthias opens a fascinating window into the turbulent movements of the religious revival known as the Second Great Awakening-movements that swept up great numbers of evangelical Americans and gave rise to new sects like the Mormons. Into this teeming environment walked a down-and-out carpenter named Robert Matthews, who announced himself as Matthias, prophet of the.

Paul E. Johnson is Distinguished Professor of History Emeritus at the University of South Carolina and is the author of numerous books, including Sam Patch, the Famous Jumper and A Shopkeeper's Millennium: Society and Revivals in Rochester, New York, 1815-1837

Paul E. Johnson is Distinguished Professor of History Emeritus at the University of South Carolina and is the author of numerous books, including Sam Patch, the Famous Jumper and A Shopkeeper's Millennium: Society and Revivals in Rochester, New York, 1815-1837. Sean Wilentz is George Henry Davis 1886 Professor of American History, Princeton University. He is the author of Chants Democratic: New York City and the Rise of the American Working Class, 1788-1950 and The Rise of Democracy: Jefferson to Lincoln, among other titles. Johnson and Sean Wilentz, The Kingdom of Matthias: A Story of Sex and Salvation in 19th-Century America, New York: Oxford University Press, 1994. Gilbert Vale, Fanaticism - Its Source and Influence Illustrated by the Simple Narrative of Isabella, in the Case of Matthias, Mr. and Mrs. B. Folger, Mr. Pierson, Mr. Mills, Catherine, Isabella, &c.

In the autumn of 1834, New York City was awash with rumors of a strange religious cult operating nearby, centered around a mysterious, self-styled prophet named Matthias. It was said that Matthias the Prophet was stealing money from one of his followers; then came reports of lascivious sexual relations, based on odd teachings of matched spirits, apostolic priesthoods, and the inferiority of women. At its climax, the rumors transformed into legal charges, as the Prophet was arrested for the murder of a once highly-regarded Christian gentleman who had fallen under his sway. By the time the story played out, it became one of the nation's first penny-press sensations, casting a peculiar but revealing light on the sexual and spiritual tensions of the day. In The Kingdom of Matthias, the distinguished historians Paul Johnson and Sean Wilentz brilliantly recapture this forgotten story, imbuing their richly researched account with the dramatic force of a novel. In this book, the strange tale of Matthias the Prophet provides a fascinating window into the turbulent movements of the religious revival known as the Second Great Awakening--movements which swept up great numbers of evangelical Americans and gave rise to new sects like the Mormons. Into this teeming environment walked a down-and-out carpenter named Robert Matthews, who announced himself as Matthias, prophet of the God of the Jews. His hypnotic spell drew in a cast of unforgettable characters--the meekly devout businessman Elijah Pierson, who once tried to raise his late wife from the dead; the young attractive Christian couple, Benjamin Folger and his wife Ann (who seduced the woman-hating Prophet); and the shrewd ex-slave Isabella Van Wagenen, regarded by some as "the most wicked of the wicked." None was more colorful than the Prophet himself, a bearded, thundering tyrant who gathered his followers into an absolutist household, using their money to buy an elaborate, eccentric wardrobe, and reordering their marital relations. By the time the tensions within the kingdom exploded into a clash with the law, Matthias had become a national scandal. In the hands of Johnson and Wilentz, the strange tale of the Prophet and his kingdom comes vividly to life, recalling scenes from recent experiences at Jonestown and Waco. They also reveal much about a formative period in American history, showing the connections among rapid economic change, sex and race relations, politics, popular culture, and the rich varieties of American religious experience.

Hidden Winter
The story is more than interesting, but at times I felt the authors got bogged down in meaningless detail (do readers really have to know every street address of every character?), and the way narratives describing individuals in the book were embedded in stories-within-stories was, at times, confusing. I frequently lost track of characters. About half-way through I definitely thought it a three star book. Three things changed my mind: the remarkable (and remarkably written) final paragraph, which sent me a shock of recognition of the implications of the tale, the final pages, which placed the tale in context, and the afterward to the second edition, which describes the art of doing and writing history so well.
Nahn
This was a fun read! I enjoyed learning about this small occult that formed and disbanded. This book provides the narrative of someone suffering from severe mental illness who begins to believe he is God. Intertwined throughout​ the narrative are themes of slavery and the role of women in society.
JoJosho
Although I am an academic with expertise in the Second Great Awakening and Early National Period of US history, I had never heard of the Prophet Matthias until a colleague suggested I read this book. "The Kingdom of Matthias" by Paul Johnson and Sean Wilentz is an extraordinary study in what happens when enthusiastic religion and mental illness combine in one individual to tip him and his followers over into the unhealthiness of a personality cult.

The Prophet Matthias stands in a long line of deeply eccentric American religious figures whose stories are compelling and frightening, yet who remain on the fringe of American religious history. He is David Koresh without an explosive encounter with BATF, a cult leader who demanded that his followers submit to him in every segment of their existence, including sexually.

But perhaps the most important and powerful story in this book is the story of his most devoted and loyal follower, who went on to play a significant role in US history in her own right. I decline to reveal her identity in this review because if the reader knows who she was, it will dramatically dilute the book's final paragraph and, ultimately, its full impact. Suffice it to say that you will never look at her the same way again after reading this book.

I'm seriously considering assigning this book to my undergraduate students in "Christianity in America" this fall. It is very readable, very provocative, and will make you think about the issues it raises long after you have finished reading it.
elegant stranger
This book had me hooked from the start. Although at times it reads like a soap opera it tells the true story of Robert Matthews also know the the prophet Matthias. Although a highly researched history book it captures the excitement of a major hollywood film. Johnson and Wilentz manage to weave the sotry in a manner that flows perfectly and tells detail by detail how Robert Matthews became the prophet Matthias and the subsequent fall of his kingdom. This book painst a vivid picture of the conditions that Americans lived through in the second great awakening.

For many Americans who felt left out by the rapid transformation of the era men with ideas like Matthews seemed to merit some consideration. For a populace that was rapidly shifting from a localistic and agrarian way of life to an urban market driven one Matthews' ideas of hyper paternalism were attractive.

I reccomend this book to anybody not just people interested in history. It brings together religion and history in a very exciting and enjoyable way.
Frei
I bought this to read about Sojourner Truth's role in the Kingdom of Matthias. But it sets out the whole story of that scandal. It reads like a novel!
Nikobar
I am a student of American History and Religious Studies. This book was fantastic, the Historians who researched and wrote this did a fantastic job. An awesome surprise awaits at the end of this book!

One of my History Prof. recommended this book to me. You don't need to be a student to enjoy this book. It is a great, easy, short read.
Pipet
I would first like to say that this was a required reader for me for my US history class, but so far, I'm a little over 1/4 way through it and I actually enjoy it. Had it not been required, and someone gave me an overview of it, and I actually read it, I would still enjoy it. I would recommend this book even if it's not a required reader. It's very interesting. Excellent descriptions of the lives of the people in this group/cult. I am excited to finish reading it here soon.
Interesting info on Sojourner Truth.