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by Charles F. Briggs
Download Giles of Rome's De regimine principum: Reading and Writing Politics at Court and University, c.1275-c.1525 (Cambridge Studies in Palaeography and Codicology) fb2
History & Criticism
  • Author:
    Charles F. Briggs
  • ISBN:
    0521570530
  • ISBN13:
    978-0521570534
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Cambridge University Press (January 28, 1999)
  • Pages:
    222 pages
  • Subcategory:
    History & Criticism
  • Language:
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    1265 kb
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    1376 kb
  • DJVU format
    1821 kb
  • Rating:
    4.7
  • Votes:
    966
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Cambridge Studies in Palaeography and Codicology. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1999. Published online by Cambridge University Press: 28 July 2009. Recommend this journal.

Cambridge Studies in Palaeography and Codicology. Export citation Request permission. New York: Cambridge University Press.

Cambridge Studies in Palaeography and Codicology, . Pp. xiv+207 incl. 45. 0 521 57053 0. J. H. Burns (a1).

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Start by marking Giles of Rome's de Regimine Principum . Giles of Rome's De regimine principum: Reading and Writing Politics at Court and University, . 275c.

Start by marking Giles of Rome's de Regimine Principum: Reading and Writing Politics at Court and University, . 275 . 525 as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. From the time of its composition (c. 1280) for Philip the Fair of France until the early sixteenth century, Giles of Rome's mirror of princes, the De regimine principum, was read by both lay and clerical readers in the original Latin and in several vernacular translations, and served as model or source for several works of princely advice. 1525 (Cambridge Studies in Palaeography and Codicology).

Items related to Giles of Rome's De regimine principum: Reading. Briggs argues that lay readers used De regimine for several purposes, including as an educational treatise and military manual, whereas clerics. Its rich detail and different lines of inquiry allow the book to achieve an optimum of both information and analysis. Briggs argues that lay readers used De regimine for several purposes, including as an educational treatise and military manual, whereas clerics, who often first came into contact with it at university, glossed, constructed apparatus for, and modified the text to suit their needs in their later professional lives.

Giles, of Rome, Archbishop of Bourges, ca. 1243-1316, Political science, Didactic . Cambridge : New York : Cambridge University Press. 1243-1316, Political science, Didactic literature, Latin (Medieval and modern), Learning and scholarship, Manuscripts, Latin (Medieval and modern), Education of princes, Education, Medieval. inlibrary; printdisabled; ; china. Cambridge, En. Cambridge University Press, 1999. xiv, 207; 17 black-and-white plates, 8 tables, and diagrams.

Briggs, Charles F. Publication, Distribution, et. Cambridge : New York. Cambridge University Press, (c)1999. xiv, 207 p. : ill. ;, 26 cm. Title: Cambridge studies in palaeography and codicology ; 5. Bibliography, etc. Physical Description: xiv, 207 p. Note: Includes bibliographical references (p. 188-200) and indexes. Personal Name: Giles,, of Rome, Archbishop of Bourges, ca. 1243-1316. De regimine principum.

Briggs argues that lay readers used De regimine for several purposes, including as an educational treatise . Cambridge Studies in Palaeography and Codicology.

Briggs argues that lay readers used De regimine for several purposes, including as an educational treatise and military manual, whereas clerics, who often first came into contact with it at university, glossed, constructed apparatus for, and modified the text to suit their needs in their later professional lives. Cambridge University Press. Learning to Read Paperback Children & Young Adult Fiction Books in English. This item doesn't belong on this page.

From the time of its composition (c. 1280) for Philip the Fair of France until the early sixteenth century, Giles of Rome's mirror of princes, the De regimine principum, was read by both lay and clerical readers in the original Latin and in several vernacular translations, and served as model or source for several works of princely advice. This study uses an interdisciplinary approach toward the surviving manuscript copies, as well as documentary and literary evidence, to show how people of the later Middle Ages read Giles' text and appropriated it for their own particular purposes.