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by Judith Oster
Download Toward Robert Frost: The Reader and the Poet fb2
History & Criticism
  • Author:
    Judith Oster
  • ISBN:
    0820316210
  • ISBN13:
    978-0820316215
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    University of Georgia Press (February 1, 1994)
  • Pages:
    360 pages
  • Subcategory:
    History & Criticism
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1124 kb
  • ePUB format
    1180 kb
  • DJVU format
    1738 kb
  • Rating:
    4.7
  • Votes:
    325
  • Formats:
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Toward Robert Frost: The. has been added to your Cart. Frost's poems, she demonstrates, teach the reader how they should be read; at the same time, they resist closure and definitive reading. The reader's acts of encountering and constructing the poems parallel Frost's own encounters and acts of construction.

Toward Robert Frost book. See a Problem? We’d love your help. Details (if other): Cancel. Thanks for telling us about the problem. Toward Robert Frost: The Reader and the Poet.

Every poem, Robert Frost declared, "is an epitome of the great predicament, a figure of the will braving alien .

Every poem, Robert Frost declared, "is an epitome of the great predicament, a figure of the will braving alien entanglements". This study considers what Frost meant by those entanglements, how he braved them in his poetry, and how he invited his readers to do the same.

Every poem, Robert Frost declared, ""is an epitome of the great predicament, a figure of the will braving alien entanglements. In the process it contributes significantly to a new critical awareness of Frost as a complex artist who anticipated postmodernism - a poet who invoked literary traditions and conventions frequently to set himself in tension with them.

Using the insights of reader-response theory, Judith Oster explains how Frost appeals to readers with his apparent . Frost s poems, she demonstrates, teach the reader how they should be read.

Frost s poems, she demonstrates, teach the reader how they should be read. University of Georgia Press.

the reader and the poet.

1 2 3 4 5. Want to Read. Are you sure you want to remove Toward Robert Frost from your list? Toward Robert Frost. the reader and the poet. Published 1991 by University of Georgia Press in Athens. Includes bibliographical references (p. -322) and index.

Toward Robert Frost: The Reader and the Poet. by Judith Oster (pp. 611-612). Contingent Meanings: Postmodern Fiction, Mimesis, and the Reader. by Jerry A. Varsava (pp. 623-624).

Frost, RobertThe Poetry of Robert Frost: The Collected Poems, Complete and Unabridged. Edward Connery Lathem, ed. New York: Henry Holt and Company, 1969. Valuable for the collation of variant readings offered in the notes to the volume. Grade, Arnold, ed. The Family Letters of Robert and Elinor Frost. Albany: State University of New York Press, 1972. Latham, Edward Connery. Athens: University of Georgia Press, 1994.

Robert Frost One of America's leading 20th- century poets. A four-time winner of the Pulitzer Prize. Poetry & the Age. New York: The Ecco Press, 1980. Athens, Georgia: The University of Georgia Press, 1991. An essentially pastoral poet. The unofficial poet laureate of America. 3 Life Experience 1874 - Born on March 26 in San Francisco. 13 Thank You Very Much for Attending This LectureThank You Very Much for Attending This Lecture.

Every poem, Robert Frost declared, "is an epitome of the great predicament, a figure of the will braving alien entanglements". This study considers what Frost meant by those entanglements, how he braved them in his poetry, and how he invited his readers to do the same. In the process it contributes significantly to a new critical awareness of Frost as a complex artist who anticipated postmodernism―a poet who invoked literary traditions and conventions frequently to set himself in tension with them.

Using the insights of reader-response theory, Judith Oster explains how Frost appeals to readers with his apparent accessibility and then, because of the openness of his poetry's possibilities, engages them in the process of constructing meaning. Frost's poems, she demonstrates, teach the reader how they should be read; at the same time, they resist closure and definitive reading. The reader's acts of encountering and constructing the poems parallel Frost's own encounters and acts of construction.

Commenting at length on a number of individual poems, Oster ranges in her discussion from the ways in which the poet dramatizes the inadequacy of the self alone to the manner in which he "reads" the Book of Genesis or the writing of Emerson. Oster illuminates, finally, the central conflict in Frost: his need to be read well against his fear of being read; his need to share his creation against his fear of its appropriation by others.