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by Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley,Susan J. Wolfson,Ronald Levao
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History & Criticism
  • Author:
    Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley,Susan J. Wolfson,Ronald Levao
  • ISBN:
    0674055527
  • ISBN13:
    978-0674055520
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Belknap Press: An Imprint of Harvard University Press; Critical ed. edition (October 31, 2012)
  • Pages:
    400 pages
  • Subcategory:
    History & Criticism
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1102 kb
  • ePUB format
    1988 kb
  • DJVU format
    1899 kb
  • Rating:
    4.5
  • Votes:
    792
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Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley.

Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley. The fresh light that The Annotated Frankenstein casts on a story everyone thinks is familiar will delight readers while deepening their understanding of Mary Shelley’s novel and the Romantic era in which it was created. Listen to a panel discussion on Frankenstein-and on the new digital Shelley-Godwin Archive-on WAMU’s Diane Rehm Show.

Frankenstein 1994 Mary Shelley Frankenstein Horror Tale Rotten Tomatoes. This version of the classic horror tale closely follows Shelley's book. The story begins in the Arctic Sea as the feverish Baron Victor von Frankenstein is rescued by a passing ship. Frankenstein: Annotated for Scientists, Engineers, and Creators of All Kinds (MIT Press) Mary Shelley The labours of men of genius, however erroneously directed, scarcely ever fail in ultimately turning to the solid advantage of mankind. 200 Years of Frankenstein: Mary Shelley’s Masterpiece as a Lens on Today’s Most Pressing Questions of Science, Ethics, and Human Creativity.

From an annotated version of Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley's 'Frankenstein' to the year's most-talked about graphic novel, you should . This new treatment includes notes on Shelley's life and highlights literary allusions within the book.

This new treatment includes notes on Shelley's life and highlights literary allusions within the book. For example, after the line by the Creature "Cursed, cursed creator! Why did I live?," a note compares the text to a quote from the Bible in which Job raged, "Let the day perish I was born.

The Annotated Frankenstein. From the publisher: First published in 1818, Frankenstein has spellbound, disturbed, and fascinated readers for generations. Mary Shelley’s awareness of European politics and history, her interest in the poets and philosophical debates of the day, and especially her genius in distilling her personal traumas come alive in this engaging essay. Their often surprising observations are drawn from a lifetime of reading and teaching the novel.

Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley, Susan J. Wolfson (Notes). Ronald Levao (Notes). Note: these are all the books on Goodreads for this author.

I replied in the affirmative. Every minute," continued M. Krempe withwarmth, "every instant that you have wasted on those books is utterlyand entirely lost. You have burdened your memory with exploded systemsand useless names

I replied in the affirmative. You have burdened your memory with exploded systemsand useless names. Good God! in what desert land have you lived, whereno one was kind enough to inform you that these fancies, which you haveso greedily imbibed, are a thousand years old, and as musty as they areancient?

Author: By Shelley, Mary Wollstonecraft. Susan J. Wolfson is Professor of English at Princeton University. Ronald Levao, Susan J. Wolfson. The Annotated Frankenstein by Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley (Hardback, 2012).

Author: By Shelley, Mary Wollstonecraft. The Annotated Frankenstein. Ronald Levao is Associate Professor of English at Rutgers University. Country of Publication. Current slide {CURRENT SLIDE} of {TOTAL SLIDES}- Compare similar products.

Discover Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley famous and rare quotes. Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley, Susan J. Wolfson, Ronald Levao (2012). The Annotated Frankenstein, . 6, Harvard University Press.

Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley; Professor of English Susan J Wolfson; Associate Professor of English Ronald Levao. Product - Frankenstein by Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley, Fiction, Classics. Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley; Sylvana Tomaselli; Mary Wollstonecraft. Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley; Vladimir Verano. Frankenstein by Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley, Fiction, Classics. There is a problem adding to cart.

First published in 1818, Frankenstein has spellbound, disturbed, and fascinated readers for generations. One of the most haunting and enduring works ever written in English, it has inspired numerous retellings and sequels in virtually every medium, making the Frankenstein myth familiar even to those who have never read a word of Mary Shelley’s remarkable novel. Now, this freshly annotated, illustrated edition illuminates the novel and its electrifying afterlife with unmatched detail and vitality.

From the first decade after publication, “Frankenstein” became a byword for any new, disturbing developments in science, technology, and human imagination. The editors’ Introduction explores the fable’s continuing presence in popular culture and intellectual life as well as the novel’s genesis and composition. Mary Shelley’s awareness of European politics and history, her interest in the poets and philosophical debates of the day, and especially her genius in distilling her personal traumas come alive in this engaging essay.

The editors’ commentary, placed conveniently alongside the text, provides stimulating company. Their often surprising observations are drawn from a lifetime of reading and teaching the novel. A wealth of illustrations, many in color, immerses the reader in Shelley’s literary and social world, in the range of artwork inspired by her novel, as well as in Frankenstein’s provocative cinematic career. The fresh light that The Annotated Frankenstein casts on a story everyone thinks is familiar will delight readers while deepening their understanding of Mary Shelley’s novel and the Romantic era in which it was created.


Carrot
Meant for serious scholars of this work or of any of it's peripheral texts and papers. Contains a plethora of original documents, manuscripts, film stills, paintings, and tons of Shelly's personal writings. A great book for someone who wants to dig deeper into Frankenstein than just textual knowledge.
in waiting
This book is fantastic. It's obvious that this was well researched. It is packed with in-depth notes and a lot of illustrations. The book has a thorough introduction and a timeline in the back. Frankenstein is one of my favorite books, and I will enjoy reading this version which I'm sure will provide new insight and thought to one of the greatest books ever written. This book must have been a labor of love, but one that will be treasured.
Redfury
The point of an edition like this is the annotations. On the one hand, any explanatory notes are interesting, but the notes here are disappointing on two counts. First, there aren't enough of them. There are numerous 2-page spreads with no notes at all. There are any number of interesting subjects that should get notes and don't. Second, more than half of the notes are attempts to validate the editors' interpretation of Frankenstein (which I happen to agree with). Far too many notes consist of "Look! Look! She wrote 'wretch' again!!" and "Percy changed this to 'being,' but Mary changed it back to 'wretch' in 1831." Easily a quarter of the notes show that Mary was thinking about Paradise Lost when she wrote the book. Well, duh. And yes, most people capable of reading Frankenstein only need to be reminded once or twice who Adam, Eve, and Satan are.

Getting the negatives out of the way: The quality of the book is shocking. It's easy to get used to getting beautiful books from Harvard and the Belknap Press. This isn't one of them. The notes are printed in a brown ink not very contrasty with the off-white paper and worse, the boards of my copy were so warped, out the packing box, that the cover hovers a good 10 degrees above the book. I have the book under about 20 pounds of other books in hopes that it will flatten. This is the risk of buying on-line, by the way. This copy would never have left a brick and mortar store in this condition.

That said, the book is an interesting read. With the editors pointing and waving, it's easier to see how distorted the story has been by its popular acceptance. We've all grown up with the idea that the monster is, well, a monster. We've had evil monsters, vicious monsters, monsters who were unfortunately given bad-guy brains. Even "Mary Shelley's Frankenstein" (which isn't, the editors remark with wry accuracy) by Kenneth Branagh gives us an evil monster. And it adds insult to injury by making the plot a "love story" (one thing it emphatically is NOT) that results in Victor trying his reanimation stunt, with predictably bad results, on the dead Elizabeth. We've had crazy Victors, criminal Victors, Byronic Victors (on the bizarre notion that because the Shelleys knew Byron, they must have worshiped him), and well-meaning Victors, but the key to Shelley's vision was the monster, and he's never had his chance to defend himself, except in the novel, where his defense is eloquent. Those few chapters in which the Creature (as the editors call him) tells his own story (however compromised by the multiple narrative layers) make him the most sympathetic character in the novel.

The Creature is presented in the novel as an abandoned child. It spends its first two years trying to make sense of a world it knows nothing about (while Shelley uses its experience to critique Rousseau on education; a matter I wish the editors had examined in more detail), to learn language without a teacher, and to find a place in a world where it is the only one of its kind and afflicted with the two unforgivable deformities of ugliness and poverty. When it tells its story, in one of the narrative Russian dolls of the novel, it has already killed Victor's younger brother, but Shelley makes the two years that lead up to this violence lead to it almost inevitably.

The novel is about the danger of science pursued without a moral foundation ("for its own sake"). The issue is not so much that Victor shouldn't have created "life," but that creating a living thing places on us responsibilities we cannot avoid. It is Victor (as he histrionically insists) who is responsible for the Creature's crimes. The Creature is "born" as a tabla rasa, with no language, no history, no biography, no morality, and no guidance, no parental foundation. Shelley makes it clear that Victor failed, as God or mother, by refusing to accept responsibility for his "monster" once it came to life. (Yes, I realize that Young Frankenstein manages to make delicious fun of even this aspect of the story.) The editorial notes elaborate on the biographical facts of Mary Shelley's life that point to this interpretation.

Frankenstein has its flaws as a novel. It is difficult, sometimes, to tell whether Victor and Walton are speaking for the author or being satirized. Victor tells the story, as his "journal" is recorded by Walton, who admires him (more technically, in a move worthy of Conrad, Walton tells the story, since he "owns" the narrative). Within it, Victor lets the Creature tell HIS story, and it's pretty clear that Shelley is not worrying too much about the POV problems this triple mirror creates. We only see the Creature once without the mediating voice of Victor, and that for less than a minute, through the highly prejudiced eyes of Walton.

The great failure of the novel is the failure of so many first-person narratives: over the generations, readers have been seduced by the narrative voice. Just as we forget Marlow is not Conrad, James is not the Governess, Shakespeare is not Hamlet, and Mary Shelley is not Victor Frankenstein. But the reader quickly falls into the fallacy. When Victor calls the Creature evil, we nod and read on. The Creature becomes evil, by any human standard. But no one judges Victor. Except Mary Shelley, and we can thank the editors for letting us see the woman behind the mask. She knew the locus of evil, if she did not fully grasp the power of owning the narrative.
Mitynarit
So glad I purchased this book. It has been a tremendous asset while developing essays and themes for my course work.
Ffan
From the stunning dust jacket to the beautifully presented text, footnotes and period art, this Annotated really delivers. I wish the "Dracula" was this good.
Avarm
Excellent detail - I've heard but not verified there may be some factual errors - that's why I'm not giving it a 5 star rating - see other reviews here for more on that. The quality of the book, binding, paper and illustrations is top-notch.
Cemav
Yes, I was shocked to learn that Lord Byron was only five feet tall, according to an allegedly authoritative annotation on page 110 of English professor Susan Wolfson's and associate professor of English Ronald Levao's THE ANNOTATED FRANKENSTEIN. And I never realized that amongst the trio that visit Colin Clive's Henry Frankenstein in Universal's 1931 film FRANKENSTEIN is an actor playing Henry Clerval, a character from the original novel! I also never knew that it was Lon Chaney Jr. who played the Monster in ABBOTT AND COSTELLO MEET FRANKENSTEIN! Wow! It is so great when annotations enlarge one's knowledge about any given topic in a main text. That is the entire purpose of annotations - to shed Promethean, professorial light on whatever the light of further knowledge is aimed at.

The trouble is, in this case the annotations need further annotations to illumine them correctly. Alas, "mad, bad, dangerous to know" Lord B. was NOT a dwarf and was actually five foot eight and a half. And John Boles was NOT playing Clerval in James Whale's FRANKENSTEIN. His character was actually named Victor Moritz. And apart from one or two stand-in scenes shot from a distance (after the actual actor playing the Monster injured his ankle on set), Lon Chaney Jr. did NOT play the Monster in ABBOTT AND COSTELLO MEET FRANKENSTEIN. 'Twas Glenn Strange in his third go at the Monster whilst Lon played Larry Talbot, a.k.a. the Wolfman, in that frankly fabulous and funny film.

Here is the point: a Professor of English and an Associate Professor of English helmed this annotated effort which is published by the prestigious Belknap Press of the Harvard University Press. Did no one, therefore, proof-read the annotations before this book was, indeed, printed and put on the market? A five foot Lord Byron is unthinkable! And it is wrong! How could two luminaries of literature NOT have checked this annotation before the ink dried? And what of the other two erroneous annotation listed above? Those are simply three I netted - how many more are there amongst all the other annotations? It is a troubling and sobering thought. Shaky scholarship is always a troubling and sobering thought.

But... the thing about this edition is that there really are not all that many annotations in this edition at all. Page after page I felt like as I was Walton or Frankenstein going snow-blind with the Arctic white and waste of so much page space! Surely so much more could have been explored and expounded upon on the often vast emptiness of too many pages. Leonard Wolf, in his admirable 1977 THE ANNOTATED FRANKENSTEIN fleshed out the pages much more enthusiastically with much more information and many more illustrations. Anyway, the cover of this current book is visually arresting and Gothically gripping. The trouble is, the lightening and the castle are more out of Universal Studios than Mary Shelley's novel.