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by Johannes de Hauvilla,Winthrop Wetherbee
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History & Criticism
  • Author:
    Johannes de Hauvilla,Winthrop Wetherbee
  • ISBN:
    0521405661
  • ISBN13:
    978-0521405669
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Cambridge University Press; 1 edition (January 19, 2006)
  • Pages:
    312 pages
  • Subcategory:
    History & Criticism
  • Language:
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    1964 kb
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    1717 kb
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    1420 kb
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    4.8
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Architrenius is a medieval allegorical and satirical poem in hexameters by Johannes de Hauvilla (also known as Johannes de Altavilla or Jean de Hauteville).

Architrenius is a medieval allegorical and satirical poem in hexameters by Johannes de Hauvilla (also known as Johannes de Altavilla or Jean de Hauteville). The poet was born in about 1150 (perhaps at or near Rouen) and died after 1200, and dedicated the work to "Gualtero, archepiscopo Rotomagensium" (Walter de Coutances, Archbishop of Rouen).

The Architrenius is a vivacious and influential Latin satirical poem dating from 1184

The Architrenius is a vivacious and influential Latin satirical poem dating from 1184. It describes the journey of a young man (the 'Arch-Weeper') on the threshold of maturity. Winthrop Wetherbee's prose translation is presented alongside the original Latin, and augmented by an introduction and extensive notes. Series: Cambridge Medieval Classics (Book 3).

Johannes de Hauvilla, Peter Dronke, Winthrop Wetherbee. The Architrenius is a vivacious and influential Latin satirical poem in nine books dating from 1184. It describes the journey of a young man (the 'Arch-Weeper') on the threshold of maturity, confronting the ills of the church, the court, and the schools of late twelfth-century Europe.

Johannes de Hauvilla : Architrenius. Cambridge Medieval Classics. Cambridge University Press. Johannes de Hauvilla.

Johannes de Hauvilla book. Published January 19th 2006 by Cambridge University Press (first published November 10th 2005).

Cambridge University Press, 1994. Similar books and articles. Nine Medieval Latin Plays. Cambridge Medieval Classics, . Cambridge, Eng. Speculum 72 (2):497-498 (1997). Peter Dronke, Ed. And Trans. Cambridge, En. Cambridge University Press, 1994. Pp. Xxxv, 237; Black-and-White Facsimile Plates. Christopher J. McDonough - 1997 - Speculum 72 (1):144-145. Literacy, Authorship, and Belief in Medieval and Renaissance Europe. Greg Walker - 1996 - The European Legacy 1 (8):2280-2283.

Johannes de Hauvilla. Cambridge University Press, 19 Oca 2006 - 312 sayfa. Cambridge University Press, 2006.

Johannes de Hauvilla's satirical allegory Architrenius, completed in 1184, follows the quest for moral . Dumbarton oaks medieval library. Translated by Winthrop Wetherbee.

Johannes de Hauvilla's satirical allegory Architrenius, completed in 1184, follows the quest for moral education of its eponymous protaganist, the 'arch-weeper,' who confronts the vices of school, church, and court. Dumbarton Oaks Medieval Library 55. Architrenius.

Artificial Paleography: Computational Approaches to Identifying Script Types in Medieval Manuscripts. Kestemont et al. Who Owns the Money? Currency, Property, and Popular Sovereignty in Nicole Oresme’s De moneta. 1427 East 60th Street, Chicago, IL 60637.

Johannes de Hauvilla: Architrenius. Speculum-A Journal of Medieval Studies

Johannes de Hauvilla: Architrenius. by Johannes Hauvilla. Speculum-A Journal of Medieval Studies. Please note that Takealot relies on the relevant brand to provide us with accurate featured content for this product. Customers Who Bought This Product, Also Bought.

Architrenius is a vivacious and influential Latin satirical poem dating from 1184. It describes the journey of a young man (the "Arch-Weeper") on the threshold of maturity, confronting the ills of the church, court, and schools of late twelfth-century Europe. The directness with which the poem engages social, psychological, and sexual problems anticipates the work of great vernacular writers such as Chaucer. Winthrop Wetherbee's prose translation is presented alongside the original Latin, and augmented by an introduction and extensive notes.