» » Shaping and Reshaping the Caribbean: The Work of Aime Cesaire and Rene Depestre (MHRA Texts and Dissertations)

Download Shaping and Reshaping the Caribbean: The Work of Aime Cesaire and Rene Depestre (MHRA Texts and Dissertations) fb2

by Martin Munro
Download Shaping and Reshaping the Caribbean: The Work of Aime Cesaire and Rene Depestre (MHRA Texts and Dissertations) fb2
History & Criticism
  • Author:
    Martin Munro
  • ISBN:
    1902653297
  • ISBN13:
    978-1902653297
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Routledge; 1 edition (December 1, 2000)
  • Pages:
    266 pages
  • Subcategory:
    History & Criticism
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1742 kb
  • ePUB format
    1149 kb
  • DJVU format
    1342 kb
  • Rating:
    4.3
  • Votes:
    955
  • Formats:
    lit lrf azw lrf


Rene Depestre's Caribbean 'shape' is quite different: Africa is relatively absent in Depestre's work; Europe is not presented as a threat; and Depestre, unlike Cesaire, sees in the Caribbean an energy and a creativity brought about by the historical fusion of disparate cultures.

Rene Depestre's Caribbean 'shape' is quite different: Africa is relatively absent in Depestre's work; Europe is not presented as a threat; and Depestre, unlike Cesaire, sees in the Caribbean an energy and a creativity brought about by the historical fusion of disparate cultures.

the work of Aimé Césaire and René Depestre. English text with extracts in French from works by Césaire and Depestre. Series Classifications. viii, 266 p. ; Number of pages.

Results from Google Books. Work-to-work relationships. For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.

Pageaux, D. (1998) ‘Sartre, les Juifs, les Noir. t les autres’, Portulan, 2, 229–46. Cite this chapter as: Britton C. (2009) Exile, Incarceration and the Homeland: Jewish References in French Caribbean Novels. In: Keown . Murphy . Procter J. (eds) Comparing Postcolonial Diasporas. Palgrave Macmillan, London.

Then, copy and paste the text into your bibliography or works cited list. com cannot guarantee each citation it generates. Therefore, it’s best to use Encyclopedia.

Work of Aime Cesaire and Rene Depestre (MHRA Texts & Dissertations) (Mhra Texts and Dissertations).

1 2 3 4 5. Want to Read. Work of Aime Cesaire and Rene Depestre (MHRA Texts & Dissertations) (Mhra Texts and Dissertations). Published July 2000 by Maney Publishing.

Martin Munro is Associate Professor of French and Francophone Literature at Florida State University. Elizabeth Walcott-Hackshaw is Lecturer of Francophone Caribbean Literature and Nineteenth-century French Poetry at the University of the West Indies, Trinidad and Tobago.

René Depestre (born 29 August 1926 Jacmel, Haiti) is a Haitian poet and former communist activist. He is considered to be one of the most prominent figures in Haitian literature. He lived in Cuba as an exile from the Duvalier regime for many years and was a founder of the Casa de las Americas publishing house. He is best known for his poetry. He did his primary studies with the Breton Brothers of Christian Instruction

Maney and Sons, 2000). Exile and Post–1946 Haitian Literature: Alexis, Depestre, Ollivier, Laferrière, Danticat (Liverpool University Press, 2007).

Maney and Sons, 2000). Different Drummers: Rhythm and Race in the Americas (Berkeley and Los Angeles: University of California Press, 2010). Writing on the Fault Line: Haitian Literature and the Earthquake of 2010 (Liverpool University Press, 2014).

The current drive in Caribbean literary studies stresses similarities and points of convergence between the various islands of the archipelago and their authors, the fundamental aim of which is to move closer to an all-encompassing theory of Caribbeanness. Martin Munro challenges this movement, and through a study of the work of Aime Cesaire and Rene Depestre, proposes an alternative vision of the present and future of Caribbean literature. The main areas of inquiry are: how these two Caribbean writers construct their sense of themselves; how they relate to the Caribbean and to the wider world; and how they have been influenced by the historical and cultural particularities of their respective islands. Aime Cesaire's sense of self and of the Caribbean is essentially shaped around the circuit triangulaire, the model of Africa/Europe/Caribbean interdependencies, ultimately inherited from the time of the slave trade. Munro shows how Cesaire views the Caribbean as a deeply traumatic, insubstantial space; how he looks to Africa for his lost sense of self; and how Europe is seen at once as the malevolent colonial power and also the home of poetry and learning. Rene Depestre's Caribbean 'shape' is quite different: Africa is relatively absent in Depestre's work; Europe is not presented as a threat; and Depestre, unlike Cesaire, sees in the Caribbean an energy and a creativity brought about by the historical fusion of disparate cultures. An important factor in 'shaping' Depestre's model of Caribbeanness is his long exile from Haiti, and Depestre's experience of exile is analysed in detail. The combination of broad contextualization, diverse theoretical approaches, and close analysis of these important writers' work, produces a strong argument against attempts to view and read writing from the Caribbean as one literature. Difference and diversity, it is argued, predominate as Caribbean writing embraces the new century, and the whole notion of Caribbeanness undergoes further processes of highly creative splintering and reshaping.