» » 47th Street Black: A Novel

Download 47th Street Black: A Novel fb2

by Bayo Ojikutu
Download 47th Street Black: A Novel fb2
Genre Fiction
  • Author:
    Bayo Ojikutu
  • ISBN:
    0609808478
  • ISBN13:
    978-0609808474
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Broadway Books; 1 edition (January 7, 2003)
  • Pages:
    432 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Genre Fiction
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1211 kb
  • ePUB format
    1671 kb
  • DJVU format
    1715 kb
  • Rating:
    4.5
  • Votes:
    959
  • Formats:
    lrf txt lrf doc


Bayo Ojikutu (born 1971) is a United States-based creative writer and university lecturer of Nigerian heritage. His first novel, 47th Street Black (Crown, 2003), received the Washington Prize for Fiction and the Great American Book Award.

Bayo Ojikutu (born 1971) is a United States-based creative writer and university lecturer of Nigerian heritage. Ojikutu's short fiction has appeared widely, including within the pages of the 2013 Akashic Press collection USA Noir and in the speculative fiction anthology Shadow Show.

47th Street Black book. See a Problem? We’d love your help.

In the early sixties, 47th street is the heart of black Chicago, where recent migrants from the South come to move up in the world.

Przeczytaj go w aplikacji Książki Google Play na komputerze albo na urządzeniu z Androidem lub iOS. Pobierz, by czytać offline. Czytając książkę 47th Street Black: A Novel, zaznaczaj tekst, dodawaj zakładki i rób notatki. In the early sixties, 47th street is the heart of black Chicago, where recent migrants from the South come to move up in the world. JC and Mookie are high school dropouts, playing stickball in the street when they stumble upon the dead body of the area's black liaison to the mafia.

47th street is alive in this novel. As a Chicago South-Sider, I found the story of Mookie and . to be very realistic. As a reader, I felt the anxiety, the fear, the ambition, the disappointment, and even the thrill that these two experience as they come of age in the steet game and eventually become two of its major players.

These are the best books set in the Windy City. Humboldt’s Gift’ by Saul Bellow (1975).

From novels to memoirs to works of history, these books will acquaint you with the Windy City’s unique character. These are the best books set in the Windy City. Moving from Canada to Chicago during his formative years made an indelible impression on Saul Bellow; several of the Nobel Prize-winning author’s novels are set in the Windy City, including Humboldt’s Gift. The novel, which won the Pulitzer in 1976, follows the friendship and creative rivalry between two writers, Charlie Citrine and his poet mentor Von Humboldt Fleisher.

Bayo Ojikutu is the critically acclaimed author of the novels 47th Street Black and Free Burning. His work has won the Washington Prize for Fiction and the Great American Book Award. Ojikutu's short work has appeared in various collections, magazines, and journals. He has been nominated for a Pushcart Prize, and he has been recognized by the African American Arts Alliance for his contribution to literary fiction. Ojikutu and his family reside in Chicago. T. Jefferson Parker was born in Los Angeles and has lived his life in Southern California

His first novel, 47th Street Black (Crown, 2003), received the Washington Prize for Fiction and the Great American Book Award.

His first novel, 47th Street Black (Crown, 2003), received the Washington Prize for Fiction and the Great American Book Award. Ojikutu's short story, "Yayi and Those Who Walk on Water: A Fable", received a nomination from the Pushcart Prize for outstanding fiction published in literary presses in 2009. By then, Three Rivers Press had released his second novel, Free Burning, to considerable critical.

His first novel, 47th Street Black (Random House/Crown, 2003), received both the Washington Prize for Fiction and the Great American Book Award. Ojikutu's short fiction has appeared widely, including within the pages of the 2013 Akashic Press collection USA Noir and in William Morrow's speculative fiction anthology Shadow Show. Ojikutu's short story, "Yayi and Those Who Walk on Water: A Fable", received a nomination from the Pushcart Prize for outstanding fiction published in small literary presses in 2009

Ojikutu, Bayo 1971-PERSONAL:Born August 27, 1971, in IL; son of Owolabi and Sylvia Ojikutu; married July .

Ojikutu, Bayo 1971-PERSONAL:Born August 27, 1971, in IL; son of Owolabi and Sylvia Ojikutu; married July 10, 1999; wife's name, Carolyn. Education: University of paign, . 1995; DePaul University, . Hobbies and other interests: Basketball, jazz.

Ojikutu's award-winning debut, 47th Street Black (2003), set . In his second novel (his first was 47th Street Black Boy), Bayo Ojikutu explores one man's struggle to survive by dancing on the thin ice of the two worlds he inhabits.

Ojikutu's award-winning debut, 47th Street Black (2003), set in African American Chicago during the 1960s, portrays a promising high-school athlete turned gangster.

The prize-winning debut of an incendiary new voice in contemporary American fiction, 47th Street Black is the story of JC and Mookie, whose rise in the gangster-driven ghettos of Chicago is as swift as it is brutal.In the early sixties, 47th street is the heart of black Chicago, where recent migrants from the South come to move up in the world. JC and Mookie are high school dropouts, playing stickball in the street when they stumble upon the dead body of the area's black liaison to the mafia. Where others would run, Mookie sees opportunity, and in no time he and JC are working for Salvie, the local boss. Within a year, they are the most infamous figures on 47th Street, best friends and partners with flashy cars, clothes, and women.As they alternate telling their stories, the balance of power shifts: smooth, charismatic Mookie becomes the de facto leader and small, violent JC the enforcer—roles that send JC to jail for a murder they commit together. In the 15 years he's away, JC gains an education and a resentment he can't control, while Mookie gains power over the entire South Side. By the time JC is paroled, both the neighborhood and the two men's lives are on an inexorable path to an explosive confrontation with simmering injustice.

digytal soul
Extremely well written bool, very scary, an expose of Cicago gangs controled by the Mafia with the cooperation of the police.
I found it very painful to read.
Nagis
This is a tough book to read. It shows a very seamy side of Chicago, and leaves very little hope for change. I like the author, his writing style is good, although I did get lost in some of his transitions.
Unereel
47th street is alive in this novel. Ojikutu captures the language and the culture and presents it in rich prose.
As a Chicago South-Sider, I found the story of Mookie and J.C. to be very realistic. As a reader, I felt the anxiety, the fear, the ambition, the disappointment, and even the thrill that these two experience as they come of age in the steet game and eventually become two of its major players.
This is much more than a story of urban hustlers, it is the story of men stuggling to first find their manhood and eventually striving to become "the man". The story is intelligently told, vivid, and engrossing.
Yahm
by the imagery and the pain conveyed. You feel the hopelessness of the folks on 47th Street and, even though he probably shouldn't be the one I was rooting for, I was on JC's side from the beginning. Rough around the edges and stubborn, JC is like many people I know. I was sorry I read it so quick!
Shakanos
I was blown away by Ojikutu's gritty, urban novel. This book is definitely not for the timid and prudish. He tells a fascinating tale of inner-city gangster life set on the South side of Chicago. Ojikutu does such a fine job developing thoughtful, three- dimensional characters that seem to jump right off the page. Being a Chicagoan, I feel compelled to drive down to 47th Street in search of Ojikutu's mystical character, Black. I can not wait until this book gets picked up by a major movie studio; this has Hollywood blockbuster hit written all over it! I just hope that Robert DeNiro and Mekhi Pfifer will be available!
Gtonydne
While reading this book I kept thinking I know J.C. and Mookie the names are diffrent but the they are the same guys I know in this day and time from around the way.
While reading this book I grew up with J.C. and Mookie, meaning that I felt it when they were kids, and then they became teenagers, and then men. I was with J.C. while he did his bid in prison, I was Mora hanging with Mookie all those years.
The scene in Prison was rough and real I cried for J.C. There were some serious comments about God and Jesus,(I didn't think anybody else thought like that)
I also was reminded of Sheakspere's Othello, because of all the manipulation going. I hated how we were/are made to do each other in, and the cycle continues.
I didn't give the brother five stars only because some parts were kind of hard to follow however, this is the brother's first effort and it was worthy.
Grillador
'47th Street Black' is a first novel for Mr. Ojikutu. He picks an interesting and difficult topic: life in the streets. Mr. Ojikutu makes political statements and observations about life in the United States through main characters Mookie and J.C.
Mookie is an exception to the rule of the projects, his parents are still together and a relative is not raising him. However, his father is just going through the motions of living without really living. Mookie has the potential to fulfill the dreams of his father, when life as a black man in the USA destroys those dreams, and Mookie turns to the other option available in his neighborhood.
J.C. is Mookie's best friend. He almost has this love/hate relationship with Mookie where he resents and admires his talents. It seems that J.C. is always living in Mookie's shadow.
The premise of 47th Street back is worthy of a book. Mr. Ojikutu intersperses the history of the 1960's through out the plot. It seems to me that the story could have been shorter and there were times that it was difficult to keep reading; the story-line did not hold my attention after a certain point. Also, sometimes the dialect makes it hard to follow. Perhaps this would be a more interesting read for men and/or women who enjoy reading about murder, drugs, chauvinism and the mafia. It is an admirable first novel, but I don't know that I would read this author again.
Leanna
R.E.A.L. Reviewers
This is a very well written and intense story of two boys who grew up in Chicago in the early 60's in rough neighborhoods and the journey they had from childhood to adulthood. One of my fav's.