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by Howard Goldblatt,Mo Yan
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Genre Fiction
  • Author:
    Howard Goldblatt,Mo Yan
  • ISBN:
    0806143398
  • ISBN13:
    978-0806143392
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    University of Oklahoma Press; Chinese Literature Today Book Series edition (November 15, 2012)
  • Pages:
    424 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Genre Fiction
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1135 kb
  • ePUB format
    1914 kb
  • DJVU format
    1800 kb
  • Rating:
    4.7
  • Votes:
    937
  • Formats:
    lit azw mbr txt


This powerful novel by Mo Yan-one of contemporary China’s most famous and prolific writers-is both a stirring love story and an unsparing critique of political . has been added to your Cart.

This powerful novel by Mo Yan-one of contemporary China’s most famous and prolific writers-is both a stirring love story and an unsparing critique of political corruption during the final years of the Qing Dynasty.

Mo Yan. Translated by Howard Goldblatt. University of oklahoma press : norman. The translator gratefully acknowledges the John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation for its generous support. This translation is dedicated to the memory of Michael Henry Heim, master translator and dear friend.

Sandalwood Death (Chinese: 檀香刑) is a 2001 novel by Nobel prize-winning author Mo Yan. The English translation of the book was released in 2013 by the University of Oklahoma Press. Opera singer Sun Bing, a leader of the Boxer Rebellion is sentenced to death for attacking at the hands of his daughter's father-in-law, an executioner known for killing by "sandalwood death," a slow method of punishment.

Электронная книга "Sandalwood Death: A Novel", Mo Yan. Эту книгу можно прочитать в Google Play Книгах на компьютере, а также на устройствах Android и iOS. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "Sandalwood. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "Sandalwood Death: A Novel" для чтения в офлайн-режиме. Sandalwood Death. Translated by Howard Goldblatt1. Publisher: University of Oklahoma Press, Norman, 2013. This powerful novel by Mo Yan-one of contemporary China’s most famous and prolific writers-is both a stirring love story and an unsparing critique of political corruption during the final years of the Qing Dynasty, China’s last imperial epoch. Sandalwood Death is set during the Boxer Rebellion (1898–1901)-an anti-imperialist struggle waged by North China’s farmers and craftsmen in opposition to Western influence.

Sandalwood Death book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Sandalwood Death: A Novel (Chinese Literature Today Book Series) as Want to Read: Want to Read saving. Cina 1900: provincia dello Shandong  . Start by marking Sandalwood Death: A Novel (Chinese Literature Today Book Series) as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

This powerful novel by Mo Yan-one of contemporary China’s most famous and prolific writers-is both a stirring .

This powerful novel by Mo Yan-one of contemporary China’s most famous and prolific writers-is both a stirring love story and an unsparing critique of political corruption during the final years of the Qing Dynasty, China’s last imperial epoch.

Chinese literature today book series. Sandalwood Death: A Novel is Volume 2 in the Chinese Literature Today Book Series.

This powerful novel by Mo Yan—one of contemporary China’s most famous and prolific writers—is both a stirring love story and an unsparing critique of political corruption during the final years of the Qing Dynasty, China’s last imperial epoch.

Sandalwood Death is set during the Boxer Rebellion (1898–1901)—an anti-imperialist struggle waged by North China’s farmers and craftsmen in opposition to Western influence. Against a broad historical canvas, the novel centers on the interplay between its female protagonist, Sun Meiniang, and the three paternal figures in her life. One of these men is her biological father, Sun Bing, an opera virtuoso and a leader of the Boxer Rebellion. As the bitter events surrounding the revolt unfold, we watch Sun Bing march toward his cruel fate, the gruesome “sandalwood punishment,” whose purpose, as in crucifixions, is to keep the condemned individual alive in mind-numbing pain as long as possible.

Filled with the sensual imagery and lacerating expressions for which Mo Yan is so celebrated, Sandalwood Death brilliantly exhibits a range of artistic styles, from stylized arias and poetry to the antiquated idiom of late Imperial China to contemporary prose. Its starkly beautiful language is here masterfully rendered into English by renowned translator Howard Goldblatt.


TheJonnyTest
Not that I consider myself an iota more "sophisticated" than any other reader, but there is no question that Sandalwood Death requires a measure of dedication that would otherwise render the formatting/narration as somewhat unwieldy.

To be certain, it is remarkable in its focused descriptiveness of rural China during the late years of the Qing Dynasty. Going far beyond the physicality of day to day life, Mo Yan's chronicling delves intensively into the individual subjectivity of those destined to live it. Passions are as profound as obeisance can be grandly superficial.

I also believe that a prospective reader would better appreciate the book if he/she were, at the very least, *somewhat* familiar with Chinese history during this period. A slightly more than cursory Wiki search would be helpful. Better yet would be prior interest in one of humankind's most fascinating cultures. Then again, this book is not for everyone.
MEGA FREEDY
This is not an easy book to read given its translation and the story centred at old China.

This took me 3 weeks to complete (compared to less than a week) given i am a lover of chinese history. The way it is translated made it hard for to comprehend and easy to "give up" after a few chapters.

Well, it is not that Mr Howard Goldblatt is not a good translator but the complexities of the story with its deep county culture make it not easy. In the end, I have to buy Mo Yan's Chinese version of the same title to fully appreciate the beauty of the Gaomi county and what the author's association the cruel Chinese punishment methods with the nuance of the opera.

I gave it 4 stars because the credit I want to give to Mr Goldblatt for the tough assignment he undertook for a lot of Mo Yan's readers to read his works. I read many of Mo's books in English and I must thank Mr Goldblatt for all the fantastic translation.

This is not a book that is easy to read but if you are up to challenge and a great Mo Yan's fan, I don't think you should skip.
sergant
Interesting. but very brutal.
Androrim
I really enjoyed this book as well as the other books of his I have read. It had me tied to his writing until the final pages.

He really gives a feeling to the places and times he writes about.

Great writer
Ckelond
Mo Yan apologizes in the afterword to this novel, saying his style most likely has regressed in the process of writing this novel. I would say that's a bit of intentional self-effacement. Mo Yan attempts to portray his characters' social status and level of education in the vernacular they employ to tell the story from their perspectives. I think he's made an honest attempt at developing rich and unique characters in this novel. Perhaps in some areas of the novel he tired of this and didn't employ as much imagination as he did in other parts, but overall I think he does an excellent job of portraying the executioner Zhaojia, his simple-minded dog-butcher son Xiaojia, the Gaomi Magistrate Qian Ding, and the Shandong Governer Yuan Shikai (who, as we know in history took over control of the Republic of China briefly, after Sun Yat-Sen's passing). The theme of unfilial children is continued in this novel, just as it first appeared in "Life and Death Are Wearing Me Out". (It also appears in "Pow!"). Although the novel's title suggests the story's climax lies in what must be one of the most excrutiating ways to be executed, in reading the novel it feels more like the climax lies in the final performance of Sun Bing's opera troupe, before they are massacred. Mo Yan emphasizes in his afterword that the real "star" of this novel is his native land's form of opera, "Maoqiang". I agree.
Maximilianishe
Very INTERESTING in regard to China's history and way of life. Harsh realities, downtrodden masses, political corruption abounds. Amidst all, a love story proceeds. I read that the author had a lot of trouble in his home country because of the revealing nature of his writings.
Gldasiy
Nobel prize for Literature yes but to read this Mo Yan novel you need to be given a penance for your sins of the past. What is it about the oriental love of suffering!
Told in alternating chapters, the narrator skillfully weaves together a portrait of a culture different from that of the west, and it is a tribute to Mo Yan's narrative skill that he easily pulls us into the lives of the main characters.