Download All Our Names fb2

by Dinaw Mengestu
Download All Our Names fb2
Genre Fiction
  • Author:
    Dinaw Mengestu
  • ISBN:
    038534998X
  • ISBN13:
    978-0385349987
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Knopf; First Edition edition (March 4, 2014)
  • Pages:
    272 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Genre Fiction
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1641 kb
  • ePUB format
    1417 kb
  • DJVU format
    1376 kb
  • Rating:
    4.7
  • Votes:
    649
  • Formats:
    mbr mobi lrf azw


Dinaw Mengestu's All Our Names is a gripping, well-crafted novel about friendship in a time of revolution and coping with the unexpected fallout of life. It is a two part story, with alternating chapters from two different perspectives.

Dinaw Mengestu's All Our Names is a gripping, well-crafted novel about friendship in a time of revolution and coping with the unexpected fallout of life. It is a two part story, with alternating chapters from two different perspectives

Dinaw Mengestu’s All Our Names follows the relationship between a foreign exchange student from Ethiopia and . All three of Dinaw Mengestu’s novels are about people who, for various reasons, come to this country and fashion new lives

Dinaw Mengestu’s All Our Names follows the relationship between a foreign exchange student from Ethiopia and the Midwestern social worker assigned to help hi. All three of Dinaw Mengestu’s novels are about people who, for various reasons, come to this country and fashion new lives. But it would be a huge mistake - it would be an insult, in fact - to call him a novelist of the immigrant experience or a chronicler of life on the hyphen or any of the other shabby, summary clichés deployed to characterize (and too often diminish and even dismiss) authors whose birth certificates identify them as foreign-born.

Читать онлайн All Our Names. To Anne-Emmanuelle, Gabriel, and Louis-Selassie. Kampala was too small for what I imagined.

Now an English professor at Georgetown University, Mengestu has just published his Dinaw Mengestu left his native Ethiopia when he was just a toddler, but he still experienced America as an immigrant, and that challenge continues to shape his fiction. Raised in suburban Chicago, he began his career in Washington with a novel set around Logan Circle called The Beautiful Things That Heaven Bears (2007). The National Book Foundation and the New Yorker quickly identified him as a rising star.

Dinaw Mengestu (born 30 June 1978) is an Ethiopian-American novelist and writer. In addition to three novels, he has written for Rolling Stone on the war in Darfur, and for Jane Magazine on the conflict in northern Uganda. His writing has also appeared in Harper's, The Wall Street Journal, and numerous other publications. He is the Program Director of Written Arts at Bard College. In 2007 the National Book Foundation named him a "5 under 35" honoree

Dinaw Mengestu left his native Ethiopia when he was just a toddler, but he still experienced . The peculiarities of this novel are clearly intentional. All Our Names is an immigrant story from a writer fully conscious that he’s working in a genre as crowded as Ellis Island

Dinaw Mengestu left his native Ethiopia when he was just a toddler, but he still experienced America as an immigrant, and that challenge continues to shape his fiction. All Our Names is an immigrant story from a writer fully conscious that he’s working in a genre as crowded as Ellis Island. Soon after winning a MacArthur genius grant in 2012, Mengestu said, I think American literature is full of immigrant narratives. We know that story quite well.

From acclaimed author Dinaw Mengestu, a recipient of the National Book Foundation’s 5 Under 35 award, The New .

From acclaimed author Dinaw Mengestu, a recipient of the National Book Foundation’s 5 Under 35 award, The New Yorker’s 20 Under 40 award, and a 2012 MacArthur Foundation genius grant, comes an unforgettable love story about a searing affair between an American woman and an African man in 1970s America and an unflinching novel about the fragmentation of lives that straddle countries and histories. All Our Names is the story of two young men who come of age during an African revolution, drawn from the safe confines of the university campus into the intensifying clamor of the streets outside.

Writer Dinaw Mengestu: 2012 MacArthur Fellow MacArthur Foundation - Продолжительность: 2:55 macfound 15 933 . Доллар США, евро, рубль и юань - Продолжительность: 23:25 Trin Invest Recommended for you. 23:25.

Доллар США, евро, рубль и юань - Продолжительность: 23:25 Trin Invest Recommended for you. Дейл Карнеги - "Секрет общения с людьми" - Продолжительность: 1:08:22 Fedor Chiflans Recommended for you.

It was a simple, seemingly harmless statement, and yet as soon as the car turned the corner I realized I had been holding my breath since hearing my name.

It was a simple, seemingly harmless statement, and yet as soon as the car turned the corner I realized I had been holding my breath since hearing my name asn’t coming back, and then I panicked. I looked for the keys in the ignition and slapped the steering wheel when I didn’t find them. I imagined Isaac and the bald man looking down at me earlier and laughing

All Our Names – Ebook written by Dinaw Mengestu.

All Our Names – Ebook written by Dinaw Mengestu. Read this book using Google Play Books app on your PC, android, iOS devices. From Dinaw Mengestu, a recipient of the National Book Foundation's 5 Under 35 Award, the New Yorker's 20 Under 40 Award, and a 2012 MacArthur Foundation Genius Grant, comes a novel about exile, about the loneliness and fragmentation of lives that straddle countries and histories. All Our Names is the story of a young man who comes of age during an African revolution, drawn from the hushed halls of his university into the intensifying clamour of the streets outside.

From acclaimed author Dinaw Mengestu, a recipient of the National Book Foundation’s 5 Under 35 award, The New Yorker’s 20 Under 40 award, and a 2012 MacArthur Foundation genius grant, comes an unforgettable love story about a searing affair between an American woman and an African man in 1970s America and an unflinching novel about the fragmentation of lives that straddle countries and histories.  All Our Names is the story of two young men who come of age during an African revolution, drawn from the safe confines of the university campus into the intensifying clamor of the streets outside. But as the line between idealism and violence becomes increasingly blurred, the friends are driven apart—one into the deepest peril, as the movement gathers inexorable force, and the other into the safety of exile in the American Midwest. There, pretending to be an exchange student, he falls in love with a social worker and settles into small-town life. Yet this idyll is inescapably darkened by the secrets of his past: the acts he committed and the work he left unfinished. Most of all, he is haunted by the beloved friend he left behind, the charismatic leader who first guided him to revolution and then sacrificed everything to ensure his freedom.  Elegiac, blazing with insights about the physical and emotional geographies that circumscribe our lives, All Our Names is a marvel of vision and tonal command. Writing within the grand tradition of Naipul, Greene, and Achebe, Mengestu gives us a political novel that is also a transfixing portrait of love and grace, of self-determination and the names we are given and the names we earn.

Flas
Dinaw Mengestu's All Our Names is a gripping, well-crafted novel about friendship in a time of revolution and coping with the unexpected fallout of life. It is a two part story, with alternating chapters from two different perspectives. The Isaac chapters are from the perspective D---, whose real name we never learn, a poor, young aspiring writer from a large family in rural Ethiopia, who winds up becoming friends with the charismatic and equally poor Ugandan young man Isaac when they both travel to a university town in Uganda just as the country is bubbling over with political turmoil which erupts into civil war. D--- was drawn to the university town (not that he can afford university) after hearing there was an African writers conference there and Isaac gives him nicknames such as The Professor, Langston, and Ali. Isaac is drawn by the political energy and comes to play a central and dangerous role in the revolution. The other chapters are narrated from Helen's perspective. Helen lives in a little town in the midwest, where she is a social worker whose life has been stuck in a rut for years. She is having an affair with a man named "Isaac" who is clear D--- from the previous narrative, not Isaac. How and why did D--- wind up taking Isaac's name? What searingly awful things happened back in Uganda that made taking refuge in a quiet, rather racist town in the midwest seem like the best plan?

This is a book about friendship, loneliness, the desire to trust and coping when you know you are being deceived, youthful idealism, the brutality of the human race, and the power of love, including the love between friends. The writing is magnificent and gripping, the content both topical and timeless. This book belongs on the Best of 2014 lists that will be published in December, but I recommend you pick it up today!
Jode
It is a beautIfully written book about Africa and an African immigrant in still segregated America. The book is set in Africa right after the independence gained by many of the countries. The optimism and hope in the continent was highest at that point, the future looked bright. However, soon things turned sour with bad governments and unmet high expectations. One of the main character moves to Amreroca and faces racism in still segreadated United States. This book is about friendship, young Africa, revolutions, violence and segregation.
Quashant
In the middle of this exquisite book is a perfect metaphor. It is the story of a town that existed as long as one person dreamed of it night. "In the beginning, everyone kept some part of the city alive in their dreams." But one day people grew tired of the burden and wished to dream of other lands or hopes for the future. A young man announces he will take the burden and dream of the city each night. However as the citizens relinquish their pictures of the city, the young man changes the scene little by little. Finally people begin to disappear and the dreamers become aware of what they had lost, but the city of memory was lost.

That story is as precise a summary of this book as any other, mostly the realities are different. Mengestu paints that murky world bordering on distrust in which one's true name is unlikely to be known. The story of Isaac and his friend takes place in the nightmare of Amin's Uganda and concerns the young men who try to rebel. In alternating chapters, we meet a young American woman, Helen, who has befriended Isaac some unknown time after the strife. She is a social worker, now numbed by the world's misery. The African man and the white woman make a threatening pair to many in their claustrophobic town. To add to her misery, Helen is sure she knows little of truth about her lover.

The imagery of the novel is precise and unhurried. Violence is almost under reported in a tone that accepts that such is the way of that world. The relationships of the young rebels and later the lovers are marked by tests of trust based on the merest of evidence. The unease and the ill defined threat are created almost as afterthoughts as the characters struggle to define themselves and the people they love.

Like Helen, I often feel that African struggles are horrors not understood by those of us who take belonging for granted. THis book invites the reader into that queasy world in which the true name is granted only after trial.
Darksinger
Dinaw Mengestu, a now publicly recognized writer, offers us subtle and moving insights into the experiences of an Ethiopian student one suspects to be much like himself. The narrator, whom we know only as Isaac, speaks of his days in Uganda, at the side of his friend Isaac, whose name he takes upon later coming to the United States. Through the collapse of identities, Mengestu addresses the deep ambiguities that thicken both subjectivity and relationships. The qualities of the book are multiple: the writing is always superb, without attracting excessive attention to itself, the psychological profiles are compelling, particularly that of the narrator, and the accounts of events always gripping without sensationalism. The only thing I find less successful is the character of Helen, who is drawn in a somewhat artificial way, as if meant to validate Isaac's complexities. The alternation of perspectives (one chapter told by the narrator, the next by Helen, and so on) is understandable in view of the fact.that each segment of the life is so thick with heterogeneous feelings and events that telling them separately would have made them too foreign to each other.
INvait
This was a whole segment of history I wasn't familiar with, except on a very superficial level. This book brings you right into one man's perception of unfolding events. I found the "Helen" chapters sort of annoying, as I found her to be annoying, but perhaps that's the point the author is trying to make...that our petty concerns are so trivial stacked side-by-side with people in another world experiencing such bloodshed and horror.