Download Son of Rosemary fb2

by Ira Levin
Download Son of Rosemary fb2
Genre Fiction
  • Author:
    Ira Levin
  • ISBN:
    070906327X
  • ISBN13:
    978-0709063278
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Robert Hale Ltd; Reprinted Ed edition (1998)
  • Pages:
    292 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Genre Fiction
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1486 kb
  • ePUB format
    1429 kb
  • DJVU format
    1862 kb
  • Rating:
    4.6
  • Votes:
    663
  • Formats:
    txt azw mbr rtf


By Ira Levin: Novels. From the novel by Mac Hyman).

By Ira Levin: Novels. The boys from brazil.

Ira Levin is the author of The Boys from Brazil, Rosemary’s Baby, Son of Rosemary, The Stepford Wives, This .

Ira Levin is the author of The Boys from Brazil, Rosemary’s Baby, Son of Rosemary, The Stepford Wives, This Perfect Day, Sliver, and A Kiss Before Dying (for which he won the Edgar Award). Levin was also the recipient of three Mystery Writers of America Edgar Allan Poe Awards. I liked the novel; in terms of pure entertainment, it held my interest to the end, with a cool twist. Sometimes over-analyzing a book, particularly a work of fiction, will almost guarantee you won't enjoy it.

Son of Rosemary book.

Rosemary's Baby is a 1967 horror novel by American writer Ira Levin, his second published book. It sold over 4 million copies, "making it the top bestselling horror novel of the 1960s. The commercial success of the novel helped launch a "horror boom", where horror fiction would achieve enormous commercial success.

Acclaimed novelist and playwright Ira Levin (1929-2007) was a native New Yorker whose books include A Kiss Before Dying, Rosemary’s Baby, This Perfect Day, The Stepford Wives, The Boys from Brazil, Silver, and Son of Rosemary. His play Deathtrap was the longest-running thriller in Broadway history.

Ira Levin was a mild-mannered playwright and novelist who wrote creepy best sellers like Rosemary’s Baby, The Stepford . Nearly all of his books were made into Hollywood movies, some more than once. Mr. Levin also wrote the long-running Broadway play Deathtrap, a comic thriller.

Ira Levin was a mild-mannered playwright and novelist who wrote creepy best sellers like Rosemary’s Baby, The Stepford Wives and The Boys From Brazil. Combining elements of several genres - mystery, Gothic horror, science fiction and the techno-thriller - Mr. Levin’s novels conjured up a world full of quietly looming menace, in which anything could happen to anyone at any time.

Son of Rosemary is a 1997 horror novel by American writer Ira Levin. It is the sequel to Rosemary's Baby. The novel begins in November 1999 with Rosemary Woodhouse waking up in a long-term care facility, where she has lain in a coma since 1973. Wholly unharmed, Rosemary soon learns that her coma was the result of a spell cast on her by the coven when they discovered that she planned to run away with young Andy.


Eayaroler
Ira Levin is one of my favorite writers and Rosemary's Baby one of my favorite books. It's an economical gem that contains just the right amount of horror, suspense, and humor. I'm not sure what its sequel, Rosemary's Son, is supposed to be. It read like parody up until halfway in when I abandoned it. It starts out well enough - the last remaining power player in the original witches' coven suddenly dies, thus breaking the spell that had put Rosemary Woodhouse in a coma for the past couple of decades. Her son, Andy - half-her, half-Devil - is now some sort of Messiah figure who has united the world in harmony. It's a decent enough set-up, and the reader is pretty convinced that this is all a cover-up to destroy humanity in one fell swoop.

But unlike Rosemary's Baby, where Rosemary is savvy enough to be constantly suspicious of those around her and their motivations, this older Rosemary is an air-headed dimwit who doesn't question anything, and even glossily dismisses the fact that her son keeps making sexually aggressive moves on her. I felt that Levin's portrayal of Rosemary in the original was one of the rare examples of a male author getting the tone of women correctly, but he fails to do that here. (Except for one scene where Andy's lover blithely praises his skills in bed to an icked-out Rosemary.)

Levin's usual economical style (read Rosemary's phone call with Donald Baumgart in Rosemary's Baby as the pinnacle of how an author can convey enormous suspense without anything but dialogue) comes across as slap-dash this time, with lots of incidentals delineated - people sitting in chairs, people getting up and walking across the room, phone conversations that go nowhere, etc. - that did not need to be in the book.

My guess is that Levin was offered a decent amount of money for a sequel and plowed ahead with it despite not having any real idea how it should work. You can safely skip this and read one of his masterpieces instead.
Shalizel
It gets a lot of stick but Son of Rosemary isn't quite as bad as some people will tell you - it was never going to live up to the superlative original, and Rosemary does seem wilfully stupid in parts of the story to facilitate the plot, but there's still a lot to like about this tale of her catching up with the past and the present (even if she takes having been in a come for decades completely in her stride) and the head-scratcher of an ending alone makes it worth a look. It's no 'Rosemary's Baby' but few books are, and Ira Levin off-the-boil is Ira Levin worth reading.
Original
Such a terrible disappointment! I'm a fan of Polanki's movie, Rosemarys Baby and wanted to discover what happened to Rosemary and her child. However, this book was hardly equipped to address and follow up the 27 years of life she missed due to being placed in a coma by Minnie and Roman.
I gave it 3 stars because the book was compelling - until the last few pages which just seemed to be the laziest ending Its Levin could find - akin to "...and then he woke up".
Truly a pity, it could have been a decent book. It's rare i finish reading a book and ask out loud "that's it? Are you kidding me?"
Consider this a friendly warning. I went into reading this book with an open mind, despite having read the negative reviews on Amazon. Unfortunately sometimes a book lives up (or down) to its reviews.
Cheber
Quite a few reviewers expressed strong negative feelings, saying Ira Levin sold out and cheated his readers. I liked the novel; in terms of pure entertainment, it held my interest to the end, with a cool twist. Sometimes over-analyzing a book, particularly a work of fiction, will almost guarantee you won't enjoy it. Appreciate it for what it is, you'll have a good time with it.
Halloween
(Written by Mrs. Loyd, shared Kindle account)
I gave it three stars because overall, I was glad for the ending. I had a harder time feeling a connection with Rosemary as I did before. Rosemary's Baby was one of the books that I've read that they stuck rough 90% of the book in the movie. With this book I needed to re-read pages having been a little confused as to what was going on. Levin has a bad habit of going paragraphs with saying, "he said" and if you put the book down, you have to go back to remember who is talking. The book did have me coming back for more just to see what was going on, but there were times when I read a passage or a scene and couldn't understand why it was going the way it was. Why was Rosemary so naïve or accepting of the odd behaviors? It was understandable in the first book because she was younger.

********Spoiler Alert**********
If you didn't get the anagram of "Roast Mules", it was SOMERSAULT which alludes to the ending. The ending leaves it to your interpretation based upon your own set of beliefs:
Was it all a dream? Was everything that Rosemary experienced in the first book and the second all one giant nightmare?
Or did Satan win? Did Satan bring her to Purgatory, where she must relive everything again and again? Was this what Andy meant by everything was going to be alright?
Does she have visions like she claimed she did within the story? If so, how do you think she will change her future? Does she have the power to do that? Was this her version of Gabriel coming to warn her in a dream?

Admittedly, I felt it was a dream. I was glad to see that Hutch and Guy were alive and to see that she wasn't harmed, yet. But I wish I had solved the puzzle before I finished the book. Somersault symbolizes her journey. Her world turns upside down just to start right where she began. But with somersaults, tumblers can repeat them or choose something else because the future is subjective.