Download Ghost Pirates fb2

by William Hope Hodgson
Download Ghost Pirates fb2
Genre Fiction
  • Author:
    William Hope Hodgson
  • ISBN:
    089968209X
  • ISBN13:
    978-0899682099
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Lightyear Pr (June 1, 1980)
  • Subcategory:
    Genre Fiction
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1211 kb
  • ePUB format
    1178 kb
  • DJVU format
    1361 kb
  • Rating:
    4.2
  • Votes:
    680
  • Formats:
    mobi lit txt lrf


William Hope Hodgson. With this book, theauthor believes that he closes the door, so far as he is concerned, on aparticular phase of constructive thought.

William Hope Hodgson. This book forms the last of three. The Hell O! O! Chaunty. Man the capstan, bullies!Men.

William Hope Hodgson (15 November 1877 – 19 April 1918) was an English author

William Hope Hodgson (15 November 1877 – 19 April 1918) was an English author. He produced a large body of work, consisting of essays, short fiction, and novels, spanning several overlapping genres including horror, fantastic fiction, and science fiction.

William Hope Hodgson (November 15, 1877 – April 1918) was an English author. The Ghost Pirates is an interesting early case of polished, ambitious, evocative literature hiding in the guise of pulp horror. He produced a large body of work, consisting of essays, short fiction, and novels, spanning several overlapping genres including horror, fantastic fiction and science fiction. Lovecraft, and both comparisons are apt. Mark Twain,Herbert Wells,Howard Lovecraft,William Hope Hodgson,Abraham Merritt. The Voyage Through Time Dimension.

The Ghost Pirates book. And in his third William Hope Hodgson's first published novel, "The Boats of the Glen Carrig" (1907), is a story of survival after a disaster at sea, and of the monstrous plant and animal life-forms that the survivors encountered while trying to reach home.

In this 1909 novel, William Hope Hodgson cleverly portrays the ghosts' gradual enslavement of the ship, without . According to the great horror writer . Lovecraft "The Ghost Pirates.

In this 1909 novel, William Hope Hodgson cleverly portrays the ghosts' gradual enslavement of the ship, without ever clearly revealing the ghosts themselves, only the absolute horror of their presence. Writer Robert Weinberg described it as "one of the finest examples of the tightly written novel ever published.

William Hope Hodgson (15 November 1877 – April 1918) was an English author. Also in 1909, Hodgson published another novel, The Ghost Pirates. In the foreword, he wrote. He produced a large body of work, consisting of essays, short fiction, and novels, spanning several overlapping genres inclu. ding horror, fantastic fiction and science fiction. completes what, perhaps, may be termed a trilogy; for, though very different in scope, each of the three books deals with certain conceptions that have an elemental kinship. This book, the author believes that he closes the door, so far as he is concerned, on a particular phase of constructive thought.

LibriVox recording of The Ghost Pirates by William Hope Hodgson.


Marinara
I'm no Hodgson expert. In fact, I haven't read any of Hodgson's work apart from this collection of a novel and some short stories, so I can't really compare the yarns in this volume to the other components of his œuvre. However, I am an avid reader of Weird Fiction, and I found this collection to be exquisitely bone-chilling.

The centerpiece of the collection, The Ghost Pirates, actually reminded me a lot of many of John Carpenter's movies in that it's a synthesis of a survival story and a horror escapade. The Melvillean crew of a merchant marine ship are thrust into a world which seems normal at first but gradually reveals itself to be the haunt of an alien horror that they cannot comprehend. From there, the novel becomes a siege story, with a gradually thinning pool of men frantically trying to stave off the otherworldly forces seeking their demise. The title might give you Pirates of the Caribbean flashbacks, but rest assured there is nothing prosaic or popcorn-y about Hodgson's 1909 classic.

The other stories included in this volume are decidedly less subtle in their build up, being more like horror sonatas than the grand horrific opera that is The Ghost Pirates. Nevertheless, they are written at the same high-quality level as their bigger brother. A common theme amongst Hodgson's stories is that the monsters contained therein are merely extensions of a hostile world. The real villain of these stories is the entire universe, which conspires against the protagonists in the same way that a storm seems to conspire against an ailing ship. If you're into Lovecraft, Poe, Melville, or any other writer of the weird and macabre, this collection is an essential purchase (in my estimation).
Deodorant for your language
If someone asked when I thought this was written right after I read it, 1909 would not have been close to my guess.
I checked several times after reading (and again when writing this review) to see if it was off by 50 years or more.
It seems too modern to me but that's probably my own bias. I would have guessed the 1960's. It's remarkably free from
the idiotic phrasing that so many books from that era are polluted with. However, brush up on your sea faring language,
there's some in here. Nothing bad, safe for kids too.

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Mini-spoiler alert
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One of the things I liked about this book is that it never really goes into detail about what/who/when they start to see.
Even as people start dying. If you like your stories neat wrapped up, and everything spelled out in the end this might
not be the book for you.
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End Mini-spoiler alert
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I'd love to see this made into a movie and I would guess that the folks who wrote Pirates of the Caribbean were very familiar with this
story because one of those movies (forgot which one) is too close to this book be a coincidence. Not that whole story, just a few parts
of it. I do not mean that in a bad way. It would make a good old fashonied story where the monsters are not blood sucking demons etc..
Just a slow build in suspense like a good Hitchcock movie. Who's the bad guy? Was that him?

I liked this book so much I went and bought the collected works by the author:

The Collected Works of William Hope Hodgson (Unexpurgated Edition) (Halcyon Classics)

The Ghost Pirates alone is worth the $1.99 that the Collected works cost.
Xinetan
William Hope Hodgson is revered as a writer of fantasy and horror fiction, among other genres. I've never read any Hodgson so I was looking forward to reading THE GHOST PIRATES, in part because of his reputation and because of Davi Sales wonderfully evocative cover art. Sad to say, I wasn't taken by THE GHOST PIRATES.

Hodgson's tale deals with a sailing ship journeying to its doom, as related by a sole survivor named Jessop. As the voyage progresses, queer things start happening on board the ship. Phantoms seem to be walking the desk. At other times, strange mists encircle the ship. Ghost ships appear only to vanish. And then things turn deadly.

Though many strange events transpire, I never felt a sense of dread about what was happening. Perhaps that was because Jessop ruminated endlessly on what he had seen/not seen, what it might be, etc. Then too, Hodgson, who had sailed the seas as a young man, uses endless nautical terms to describe the ship. It's all authentic terminology but, after a while, you get tired of scratching your head wondering what a fore brace lock is or a sherpole or t'gallant rigging.

Others have praised THE GHOST PIRATES so I might be all 'at sea' about it. Pick up a copy and see for yourself. You may be scared out of your wits. I wasn't.
iSlate
The Ghost Pirates was entertaining and holds up incredibly well for its age; I'm actually a bit surprised it has not received an update as a screenplay as it would translate well into a period horror movie. I downloaded this because it was free and fell into the horror genre. I was not disappointed and it is well worth the read. No blood and guts, but plenty of death and supernatural occurrences in the Nautical/Gothic sense. It is written in first-person, and is filled with archaic nautical terms which the Kindles dictionary handles quite nicely (for the most part).

I don't give away detailed plot points in my reviews, but in a nutshell this is a story about a sailor who takes a job on a reputedly haunted ship. It follows the basic formula of disbelief and isolation, followed by a group realization that something is not quite right. Appropriately creepy, it reminds me of something one might hear from The Chowder Society (if you are unfamiliar with that group, read Ghost Story by Peter Straub).