Download The Silent Man fb2

by Alex Berenson
Download The Silent Man fb2
Genre Fiction
  • Author:
    Alex Berenson
  • ISBN:
    0091931088
  • ISBN13:
    978-0091931087
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Hutchinson Radius; 1st ed. edition (June 1, 2009)
  • Pages:
    432 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Genre Fiction
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1937 kb
  • ePUB format
    1574 kb
  • DJVU format
    1706 kb
  • Rating:
    4.3
  • Votes:
    982
  • Formats:
    lrf mbr doc docx


Berenson Alex Читать онлайн The Silent Man. Berenson Alex. A quiet man, well schooled in the Book, which meant more and more to Shamir as his death approached

Читать онлайн The Silent Man. A quiet man, well schooled in the Book, which meant more and more to Shamir as his death approached. The man knelt on the concrete floor of Shamir’s apartment and took his hand.

Alex Berenson (born January 6, 1973) is a former reporter for The New York Times and the author of several thriller novels and a book on corporate financial filings. He is the author of the controversial 2019 book Tell Your Children: The Truth About.

Bashir couldn’t think of anything to say, and so he lay silent as she stroked him hard and then straddled his legs and guided him into her, all the while whispering, No no no.

The Silent Man. 401 printed pages. The New York Times bestselling author of The Ghost War and The Faithful Spy CIA agent John Wells has spent years in the company of evil men. He's paid the price and is beginning to doubt if he can ever live a normal life. And when a powerful adversary from his past finds him, Wells must once again enter the fray.

Alex Berenson is the New York Times bestselling author of the John Wells series, including The Faithful Spy, which won the 2007 Edgar Award for best first novel. As a reporter for The New York Times, Berenson covered topics ranging from the occupation of Iraq-where he was stationed for three months-to the flooding of New Orleans, to the world pharmaceutical industry, to the financial crimes of Bernie Madoff. He graduated from Yale University in 1994 with degrees in history and economics, and lives in New York City. Библиографические данные. Annotation. Alex Berenson’s third novel finds CIA agent John Wells and his fianc?e Jenny Exley settling into domestic life in Washington . Author: Alex Berenson. But an attack from an old nemesis has Wells once again fighting to save his country, as Exley fights to save her own life. Berenson is known for writing vivid, realistic villains, and the jihadists Wells must track down here are no exception.

Alex Berenson's "The Silent Man," the third in his ever-lengthening series of shoot-em-up spy thrillers starring his alter ego John Wells, does not disappoint. The action-packed story is laced with emotional crises, self-doubts, relational challenges, and hair-raising stress

Alex Berenson's "The Silent Man," the third in his ever-lengthening series of shoot-em-up spy thrillers starring his alter ego John Wells, does not disappoint. The action-packed story is laced with emotional crises, self-doubts, relational challenges, and hair-raising stress. World-threatening bad guys come across as real people with thoughts and motivations that support their behaviors.


Modred
Berenson starts his books with the plot line and characters to be developed as the story unfolds. You wonder how, when and why John Wells will enter the picture, but when he does, usually right after the prologue, it is with a vengeance. His love interest is nearly killed protecting him and the threat of a nuclear dirty bomb being set off is motive enough for him to enter the fray and take all comers.
John Wells is a former CIA operative and is under the protective eye of his mentor, Ellis Shafer, a sarcastic, sardonic, atheist who has John's back in any way that he can do so.
When he realizes where and who has the bomb, he acts quickly and decisively, nearly losing his own life in the process, but when all the smoke clears and it becomes known what he has done, he is a hero.
Yanki
While I really enjoyed the GHOST WAR-- The Silent Man was almost as good. Berenson does a great job showing that his hero, John Wells, is a troubled being, troubled by his violent life, but unable to keep from being drawn back into undercover intelligence work and its violence. In this story, Wells is attacked by professionals hired by a nemesis left over from the GHOST WAR novel. While seeking vengeance, his nemesis clues him in on a threat to the United States that is imminent and would prove disastrous. How the agency gathers their info and seeks to track down terrorist cells and the the threat is almost as interesting as the hero of the novel. This series is a great find and I'm enjoying it immensely,.
VariesWent
John Wells is at the center of most of the action, but he an Jennifer first decide to buy a house as they love each other. Meanwhile a hapless employee of the Russian facility where all the warheads are stored is propositioned by his cousin to help steal 2 warheads. When the cash and promises get big enough, he agrees. This sets in action a multiple country journey and the possibility of a nuclear bomb on American soil. This is an excellent read.
Pruster
When I read a spy story, I tend to look for credible characters and plausible plots as well as the usual fare offered up by the genre, such as suspense, exciting action, and (sometimes) exotic locales. In virtually all these ways, The Silent Man passes my litmus test as an excellent example of the craft -- but one decision by the President of the United States, not even critical to the plot, struck me as so implausible and so dumb that it soured the final chapters.

However, there's no denying that The Silent Man builds tension from its opening scenes inside Russia's super-secret nuclear production complex to its conclusion in an utterly commonplace setting within the United States. The protagonist is soldier-spy John Wells, a former Ranger who spent a decade infiltrating Al Qaeda in Afghanistan and went on to work for the CIA, where he now hangs his proverbial hat. The Silent Man -- Wells himself, deeply troubled by his crumbling relationship with his partner and lover, Jennifer Exley -- is the focus of much of the book, but through Alex Berenson's pose as an omniscient narrator we roam through the minds of the Al Qaeda terrorists Wells is pursuing as well as his colleagues and rivals within the CIA and the hard-line officials at the top of Russia's nuclear establishment. Every character in this book is portrayed with fine brush strokes, emerging as a fully rendered person who acts in understandable ways (with the sole exception of the aforementioned President).

The Silent Man is the third in Alex Berenson's series about soldier-spy John Wells and his continuing efforts to keep the world safe for humanity.

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Malogamand
The book deals with a serious stuff in an intelligent way. For the story the author has to connect two quite different threads, one serious, the other one bit marginal. After he merges them the book becomes quite plausible and the last pages look convincing to me.

The author used to be a New York Times reporter and some of the details look more authentic than others.

I specially appreciated the passage about the disillusioned fictional US Ambassador to Kremlin. When Soviet Union (a nominal superpower) became Mother Russia again, it was generally demoted from a superpower to a 'major power' and many people in Russia are not happy with that till this day (and probably never will).

An idealistic US Ambassador who prepared for this post for decades tries to do his best in Kremlin without much success. Something bit similar, I think, that is now going on with Mr. Snowden, still at the Sheremetyevo airport as I write this review.

The book is worth reading although I cannot give it all five stars like I gave Berenson's first book
Kiutondyl
Alex Berenson's "The Silent Man," the third in his ever-lengthening series of shoot-em-up spy thrillers starring his alter ego John Wells, does not disappoint. The action-packed story is laced with emotional crises, self-doubts, relational challenges, and hair-raising stress. World-threatening bad guys come across as real people with thoughts and motivations that support their behaviors.

BERENSON is one of the few mystery authors who delves deeply into the psyche and perceptions of characters who end up dead - a trick of story-telling not possible in non-fiction work where it's too late to interview the dead person to see how they thought and felt in the process of getting killed.

Clever plot twists, split-second revelations, agonizing anxiety, terrific tension, graphic horror and violence - all combine to give a Berenson book a classy place in the genre..
Dandr
A very quick read, but doesn't short the significant, or even the minor details that make this a compelling series, and group of characters. Get ready because the climaxes in the series often come about very quickly, and while satisfying for the most part, sometimes leave you thinking "is that it?", "it's over, just like that?". Berenson doesn't seem one to draw things out, much like his character John Wells - get to the point, do it quickly, and cover your bases! This is the third book in the series that I've enjoyed and don't plan on stopping now.