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by Colm Toibin
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Genre Fiction
  • Author:
    Colm Toibin
  • ISBN:
    0743250419
  • ISBN13:
    978-0743250412
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Scribner; Reprint edition (May 3, 2005)
  • Pages:
    338 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Genre Fiction
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1969 kb
  • ePUB format
    1479 kb
  • DJVU format
    1851 kb
  • Rating:
    4.3
  • Votes:
    838
  • Formats:
    doc rtf mobi lit


The Master is a novel by Irish writer Colm Tóibín.

The Master is a novel by Irish writer Colm Tóibín. It is his fifth novel and it was shortlisted for the 2004 Booker Prize and received the International Dublin Literary Award, the Stonewall Book Award, the Lambda Literary Award, the Los Angeles Times Novel of the Year Award and, in France, Le prix du meilleur livre étranger in 2005. The Master depicts the American-born writer Henry James in the final years of the 19th century.

Colm Tóibín is the author of nine novels, including The Blackwater Lightship; The Master, winner of the Los Angeles Times Book Prize; Brooklyn, winner of the Costa Book Award; The Testament of Mary; and Nora Webster, as well.

Colm Tóibín is the author of nine novels, including The Blackwater Lightship; The Master, winner of the Los Angeles Times Book Prize; Brooklyn, winner of the Costa Book Award; The Testament of Mary; and Nora Webster, as well as two story collections, and Mad, Bad, Dangerous to Know, a look at three nineteenth-century Irish authors. I would never have discovered Colm Toibin if it wasn't for the movie Brooklyn. Many of my friends also had read and loved that book. After seeing the movie, I decided to read Colm Toibin.

Colm Tóibín has not only written a spectacular novel he has found a way to pay tribute to Henry James. We should all be so gifted and so lucky’. Alice Sebold, author of The Lovely Bones. Ultimately, it is the essence of Henry Jame. hich Tóibín resurrects in this brilliant novel’. It is hard to imagine an admirer of Henry James not being gripped by this novel – a work of literary devotion by a writer who is himself a master of plush prose and psychological nuance’. One of the most remarkable novels of the year’.

Colm Tóibín’s beautiful, subtle illumination of Henry James’s inner life (The New York Times) captures the loneliness and hope of a master of psychological subtlety whose forays into intimacy inevitably fail those he tried to love

Colm Tóibín’s beautiful, subtle illumination of Henry James’s inner life (The New York Times) captures the loneliness and hope of a master of psychological subtlety whose forays into intimacy inevitably fail those he tried to love. Beautiful and profoundly moving, The Master tells the story of Henry James, a man born into one of America’s first intellectual families who leaves his country in the late nineteenth century to live in Paris, Rome, Venice, and London among privileged artists and writers.

9. The Master (2004), Colm Tóibín The Master is a novel by Irish writer Colm Tóibín

Colm Tóibín’s beautiful, subtle illumination of Henry James’s inner life (The New York Times) captures the loneliness and hope of a master of psychological subtlety whose forays into intimacy inevitably fail those he tried to love. 9. The Master (2004), Colm Tóibín The Master is a novel by Irish writer Colm Tóibín.

The master : a novel. by. Tóibín, Colm, 1955-. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. American writer John Updike described the book in The New Yorker (2004-06-28): Tóibín's subject is the inward James, the master of literary creation and a vast hushed arena of dreams and memories and hoarded observations. It is his fifth novel and it was shortlisted for the 2004 Booker Prize and received the International IMPAC Dublin Literary Award, the Stonewall Book Award, the Lambda Literary Award, the Los Angeles Times Novel of the Year Award and, in France, Le prix du meilleur livre étranger in 2005.

ISBN 10: 0743250419 ISBN 13: 9780743250412. Publisher: Scribner, 2005.

Book Summary Colm Tóibín’s Brooklyn is a controlled, understated novel, devoid of outright passion or contrivance, but alive with authentic detail, moved along by the ripples o. .

Hauntingly beautiful and heartbreaking, Colm Tóibín's sixth novel, Brooklyn, is set in Brooklyn and Ireland in the early 1950s, when one young woman crosses the ocean to make a new life for herself. Eilis Lacey has come of age in small-town Ireland in the years following World War Two. Though skilled at bookkeeping, she cannot find a job in the miserable Irish economy. Colm Tóibín’s Brooklyn is a controlled, understated novel, devoid of outright passion or contrivance, but alive with authentic detail, moved along by the ripples of affection and doubt that shape any life: a novel that offers the reader serious pleasure. The scene is eerie, falsely naïve.

“Colm Tóibín’s beautiful, subtle illumination of Henry James’s inner life” (The New York Times) captures the loneliness and hope of a master of psychological subtlety whose forays into intimacy inevitably fail those he tried to love.Beautiful and profoundly moving, The Master tells the story of Henry James, a man born into one of America’s first intellectual families who leaves his country in the late nineteenth century to live in Paris, Rome, Venice, and London among privileged artists and writers. With stunningly resonant prose, “The Master is unquestionably the work of a first-rate novelist: artful, moving, and very beautiful” (The New York Times Book Review). The emotional intensity of this portrait is riveting.

Monam
I would never have discovered Colm Toibin if it wasn't for the movie Brooklyn. Many of my friends also had read and loved that book. After seeing the movie, I decided to read Colm Toibin. Starting with Nora Webster, I then moved to The Master, recommended by other friends and readers. I am not a fan of Henry James particularly, but this book is mesmerizing, written with the care to words and sentences in the manner of James. Maybe I should return to read him! Eagerly awaiting all the other novels that Toibin has written. This is one of the finest books I have read in a long time.
huckman
The Master is Henry James, the expatriate 19th century American author revered by many for his analysis of the art of fiction. The book opens when James is in his 50s and experiencing problems in his work -- a play in London doesn't go well and his fiction isn't earning adequate praise or money. In eleven chapters that unfold over five years, Colm Toibin weaves a now story with a series of flashbacks to the past to draw a portrait of the artist as a middle-aged man. Toibin's prose is more straightforward than the prose of James, but some things are left unspoken. Clearly, the author believes James was a closeted homosexual, a theme threaded throughout this novel without being tackled head on. Made much more clear are the other ways James holds himself apart -- from his country, from his family, from his friends -- and the price he pays for that distancing. Although Toibin's last image of James -- standing alone looking through a window -- captures his essential complaint that James' never really lived, the author also manages to provide the explanation for the Master's choice: to succeed with his art, James needed to hold himself apart. I quite enjoyed this novel, as will most students of James' fiction, but I don't think it will appeal to most contemporary readers. Long on introspection and missing a conventional plot, The Master, like the fiction of James himself, is not for everyone.
wanderpool
Toibin kindles the reader’s imagination to inhabit Henry James’s mind—if not his psyche—and to question one’s own observations and decisions on how best “to live all we can.” It is the deaths of those dear to us that challenge us to review our actions and motives and to resolve—or not—to change.
I consider this a tour de force of imaginative historical fiction that pushes and pulls the reader to dig deeper into the author’s meanings. Manners, unfolding events, personalities, friendships, family relationships, social ploys, intellectual arguments—so much finds a place here.
Surely, now I must read James’s own writings.
Gerceytone
The Master presents a fascinating study of the mature years in the life of Henry James. It covers his relationship with his siblings and close friends. It also depicts his creative process from idea to completion. The most interesting and delicately handled part of his life deals with his interactions with his friends. His conflicts over his sexuality are carefully examined. I think you would enjoy this novel more if you are a fan of his writing as I am. I really enjoyed exploring the man behind the literature.
Conjukus
This is not a light read, but that only makes it all the more delightful. It builds a world in which the protagonist moves slowly, quiet and sharp, and where regular conversations becomes an elaborate dance of subtleties and hidden meanings. It can be purple prosey at times, but its rich depictions of ordinary life make up for it. It is also wonderful how everything ties up at the end, and how you feel so personally invested in Henry's feelings and liasons, having read about each person and his relationships to them in different stages and level of intimacy. I can't bow for its historical accuracy, though it is quite accurate on names and places and faces, but it is a brilliant read if you like well-traveled english writers with an introvert disposition.
Adokelv
This novel is an excellent recreation of a period in the life of Henry James--his mind-set and his sensibility as he lives through some key events between 1895 and 1899 and re-lives others through memory. The author, Colm Toibin, really takes us inside the James character, offering more than a biography could. We grasp the sensibility of a writer who likes to maintain his privacy as he works on his craft, but we also see his attraction to certain men, even though he remains celibate. We understand how writing has taken priority over the demands of friendship, especially with James's "secret best friend," Constance Fennimore Cooper, who committed suicide in Venice after Henry failed to join her there. In the novel Henry struggles to accept his responsibility for occasionally letting down certain people, as he comes to terms with dark memories and the pain of loss of familiy members and friends. There are moments of joy too, as he relishes time spent at Lamb house, his residence in Rye, England.

The novel is beautifully and sensitively written, very detailed and engaging. I'd recommend it for anyone who wants to probe the mystery of Henry James, but also for those interested in gaining "inner views" on a dedicated writer who is also a repressed homosexual.
SARAND
Extraordinary novel, insightful and brilliant. Toibin recreates James' world, literary and mundane with beautiful simplicity. His writing is poetic and insightful and the mind of Henry seems so ever present and in dialogue with himself and his world. The complex relationships with his family, the Civil War, the literary success, self imposed exile, ghosts and fantasies, everything is expressed with seeming simplicity, yet it all its complexity.
You really have to be a fan of classical literature to wade your way through this book. I think most people would find it tedious, but in the end, I really wanted to finish the story. It really dances around Henry James sexual orientation while at the same time make it pretty obvious, though never confirmed. He was a really driven man, most comfortable in his own company