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by Thomas Berger
Download The Return of Little Big Man fb2
Genre Fiction
  • Author:
    Thomas Berger
  • ISBN:
    0316098442
  • ISBN13:
    978-0316098441
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Little Brown & Co; 1st edition (February 1999)
  • Pages:
    432 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Genre Fiction
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1409 kb
  • ePUB format
    1787 kb
  • DJVU format
    1947 kb
  • Rating:
    4.5
  • Votes:
    821
  • Formats:
    rtf lrf mbr rtf


Home Thomas Berger The Return of Little Big Ma.

Home Thomas Berger The Return of Little Big Man. Home. The return of little bi. .The Return of Little Big Man, . It was always my imprecise but sincere intention, on completing Little Big Man in the spring of 1964 (books went on sale the following October; publishing was speedier in those days) to continue the biography of Jack Crabb, who was supposed to be 111 years old as of 1952, which would make him about thirty-five when the narrative ends with the Battle.

Little Big Man is a 1964 novel by American author Thomas Berger. Often described as a satire or parody of the western genre, the book is a modern example of picaresque fiction. Easily Berger's best known work, Little Big Man was made into a popular film by Arthur Penn

Электронная книга "The Return of Little Big Man: A Novel", Thomas Berger

Электронная книга "The Return of Little Big Man: A Novel", Thomas Berger. Эту книгу можно прочитать в Google Play Книгах на компьютере, а также на устройствах Android и iOS. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "The Return of Little Big Man: A Novel" для чтения в офлайн-режиме.

Читать онлайн - Berger Thomas. Little Big Man Электронная библиотека e-libra. ru Читать онлайн Little Big Man. Berger Thomas

Читать онлайн - Berger Thomas. Berger Thomas.

Jack Crabb, hero of Little Big Man and beloved chronicler of the Wild West, is back in the saddle again. Berger takes his readers into several famous western venues in the post Little Big Horn era, and I enjoy novels that reposition the reader with historical figures who are already formed in our minds, like Wild Bill Hicock, Wyatt Earp, Doc Halliday and Buffalo Bill Cody. It took me a while to get comfortable with Jack/LBM's grammar or lack thereof, but then it became very consistent with the storyline and helped carry his tale forward.

Thomas Berger, the reclusive and bitingly satirical novelist who explored . He revisited the western, and his best-known character, in The Return of Little Big Man (1999).

Thomas Berger, the reclusive and bitingly satirical novelist who explored the myths of the American West in Little Big Man and the mores of 20th-century middle-class society in a shelf of other well-received books, died on July 13 in Nyack, . He was 89. His agent, Cristina Concepcion, said she learned of his death, at Nyack Hospital, on Monday. Mr. Berger fell into that category of novelists whose work is admired by critics, devoured by devoted readers and even assigned in modern American literature classes but who owe much of their popularity to Hollywood.

Thomas Berger o me in most every department. But you might well ask why I never done more to improve myself, beginning with trying to use better English. Well, to be fair to me, I did and though I would talk better for a while, it didn’t stick for long at a time.

As sequels go, "The Return of Little Big Man" was welcome as hell. Thirty-five years after the original, Thomas Berger gave us a second (and final, unfortunately) book told by Jack Crabb, who lived more than 110 years and walked among, as he tells it, many of the Wild West's most colorful figures. Of course it's not as good as "Little Big Ma. Nobody could expect that. But "The Return" is worthy and strong, and that's plenty. Berger has to pull a "nope, he didn't die after all" trick to allow As sequels go, "The Return of Little.

In 1964, Little Big Man gave us the reminiscences of Jack Crabb - a white orphan raised among the Cheyenne - who returns to 'civilized' society . At the end of Little Big Man, Jack's supposed death at age 111 cut short his tale

In 1964, Little Big Man gave us the reminiscences of Jack Crabb - a white orphan raised among the Cheyenne - who returns to 'civilized' society, where (am. At the end of Little Big Man, Jack's supposed death at age 111 cut short his tale. A newly discovered manuscript, however, reveals that Jack had faked his death to get out of his publishing contract, and he now picks up the story of his extraordinarily action-packed life.

Only white man to survive the Battle of Little Bighorn, the Indian-raised Jack Cabb describes his subsequent adventures. He bodyguards saloon owner Wild Bill Hickock, rides in Europe with Buffalo Bill Cody's Wild West show and acts as Sitting Bull's interpreter, witnessing his murder. A sequel to the 1964 Little Big Man.

A much anticipated sequel to Little Big Man continues the story of Jack Crabb--the only white survivor of Custer's Last Stand--as he accompanies Buffalo Bill Cody to Europe with his Wild West Show, where he hobnobs with Queen Victoria and reveals the truth behind the murder of Sitting Bull. 50,000 first printing.

Barit
This is written 37 years after " Little Big Man" and it shows. The hero Jack Crabb is alive and again interviewed by a reporter: he again sets about setting the record straight on events from the west.

Crabb was the only white survivor of The Battle at Little Big Horn, he was there when Wild Bill Hickok died with his hand of eights and aces. He was an integral part of Buffalo Bills Wild West Show.

Again we get the history as we did with the first book but its not as funny, doesn't flow as well and has a tried too hard feel about it. Berger was 75 years of age when he wrote this and while its a good effort I believe he should have left Jack Crabb in 1964 and left his quiet amazing body of work since speak for him.

Its an interesting read with good history and interesting facts but I have been spoilt by the original.
Original
Like so many sequels, this one was a disappointment. Jack Crabb is back spinning tall tales of the Wild West… but they aren’t that wild. In this book, he fakes his own death (with the help of his nursing home staff) to get out of his first publishing contract and is supposedly telling this batch of malarkey to a new editor. According to Jack, he hung out with Bat Masterson, had his tooth fixed by Doc Holliday, took care of drunken Katie Elder, was present at the gunfight at the O.K. Corral, was present at the death of Wild Bill Hickok, and traveled the world with Buffalo Bill’s Wild West Show, where he befriended Buffalo Bill, Annie Oakley and Sitting Bull, to name a few. Sounds interesting, right? Surprisingly boring, especially the lengthy descriptions of the BBWW show and its season at the famous Chicago World’s Fair, where Jack meets up again with this book’s ridiculously recurring character, uptight do-gooder Amanda Teasdale (In the last book it was his frenemy Younger Bear).
roternow
Berger gifts us with a sequel to the story of Jack Crabbe. It picks up where the first book left off, and I think my review of that book applies completely here. The writing, in first person, is hilarious, yet more introspective than you think somebody of this level of articulation could express. I don't really want to go into the plot, I just have to say that it is a very sad fact that Mr. Berger passed before yet another installment could be written. If you loved the first one this is a natural go-to. NOTE: I would not recommend reading this book without having read the first one.
Mejora
Follow up to the book voted by historians to be the greatest historical novel written about the American West and also voted the greatest American historical novel written in the twentieth century, this continues the story of Jack Crabb, a white man raised as a Cheyenne brave who was returned to the white world as a teenager. Over his life he goes back and forth between living in white society and living as an Cheyenne. The second book as not as incredible as the first but eventually won me over entirely. I wish Thomas Berger had lived long enough to write a third chapter in Crabb's life.
Gholbimand
I definitely enjoyed the return of Little Big Man aka Jack Crabb. Berger takes his readers into several famous western venues in the post Little Big Horn era, and I enjoy novels that reposition the reader with historical figures who are already formed in our minds, like Wild Bill Hicock, Wyatt Earp, Doc Halliday and Buffalo Bill Cody. It took me a while to get comfortable with Jack/LBM's grammar or lack thereof, but then it became very consistent with the storyline and helped carry his tale forward. I also feel he does a find job taking us inside the collective and individual consciousness of native americans as their world is rearranged for them. I was even taken in by the late twists and turns of plot and a bit of a surprise ending that sets up "the further adventures of Little Big Man. All said, this was a nice read, with chapters just the right length for insomniacs like myself, so the sleeping pills kick in just as you finish the episode.
I'm a Russian Occupant
In my opinion -- as was often the case with his protagonist, Jack Crabb -- Mr. Thomas Berger keeps some really fine and "rarified" company; i.e., to me, this book and the first one (_Little Big Man_) rank right up there with the works of, for example, Victor Hugo, Charles Dickens, and Arthur Conan Doyle - some of my all time favorite authors.

No offense to anyone, though, but to me, the movie based on the first of the two books, is just downright silly. So, don't settle for the movie - read the books. You'll be glad you did.
Voodoolkree
The tales of Jack Crab continue. As I read I thought of Dustin Hoffman's voice and that made things come to life even more. True or not it really doesn't matter. This is a great read. A bit of history of Native Americans and also how they saw things not at all as the whites did. Jack's adventures are funny and sometimes teach a lesson that he did not plan, The book gets a little slow toward the end. I went all the way to end. Just seems he just ran out of stuff to say. Other readers may find their end of the story earlier than I did. I was glad to hear from Jack again.
I'm always excited when I find a writer I like because I immediately look for more books by him/her. This book was a bonanza because not only it is practically perfect - I can't think of a flaw - but it's a SEQUEL to a book i haven't read and now I want to read that and all the rest of Mr. Berger's work. Yippee! As for this book, if you saw the movie Little Big Man you probably have an idea where it's going. If you haven't don't worry - or get Little Big Man and read it first. If this is the second time around the first must really be stellar. SPOILER WARNING: the plot is American history., More or less.