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by Herman Wouk
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Genre Fiction
  • Author:
    Herman Wouk
  • ISBN:
    1439507376
  • ISBN13:
    978-1439507377
  • Genre:
  • Subcategory:
    Genre Fiction
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1142 kb
  • ePUB format
    1304 kb
  • DJVU format
    1923 kb
  • Rating:
    4.5
  • Votes:
    851
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The Caine Mutiny is the 1951 Pulitzer Prize-winning novel by Herman Wouk. The novel grew out of Wouk's personal experiences aboard a r in the Pacific Theater in World War II.

The Caine Mutiny is the 1951 Pulitzer Prize-winning novel by Herman Wouk. Among its themes, it deals with the moral and ethical decisions made at sea by ship captains. The mutiny of the title is legalistic, not violent, and takes place during Typhoon Cobra, in December 1944. The court-martial that results provides the dramatic climax to the plot.

The story of a modern-day mutiny aboard a . We’re dedicated to reader privacy so we never track you. We never accept ads.

Herman Wouk was born in New York on May 27, 1915. degree from Columbia University, New York. His other books include City Boy, Marjorie Morningstar, This Is My God, The Winds of War, War and Remembrance, and Sailor and Fiddler. In 1936, he became a radio scriptwriter with Fred Allen. In 1941, he served the . government by producing radio broadcasts to sell war bonds. He joined the United States Navy and served in the Pacific. He began his first novel during off-duty hours at sea. He has been a full-time writer since 1946. He received the Pulitzer Prize for fiction in 1952 for The Caine Mutiny.

The Caine Mutiny book. Wouk served on a r during World War II, and his evocation of the experience is almost tactile. You spend a lot of time on the old Caine, with her peeling paint, her rusted deck, rank with the smell of sweat and stack gas. Wouk nails the monotony, the rhythms, and the protocols of naval service.

The Caine Mutiny was Herman Wouk’s first post World War II novel The Caine Mutiny is one of the greatest books I have ever read - and I've read many. I have read this book so often I couldn't put a number to this reality

The Caine Mutiny was Herman Wouk’s first post World War II novel. Published in 1951, the novel qualified as contemporary fiction. Sixty-six years later it’s a classic coming-of-age story that reads like historical fiction. The story isn’t about the . Caine or even the ubiquitous Captain Queeg with his ball bearings. The Caine Mutiny is one of the greatest books I have ever read - and I've read many. I have read this book so often I couldn't put a number to this reality. It is insightful to an extraordinary degree as to the lives and behaviour of people with a special focus on the WW2 Navy. These insights can only have emerged from a man (Herman Wouk) who has lived them.

Herman Wouk's acclaimed novels include the Pulitzer-Prize winning The Caine Mutiny; Marjorie Morningstar . The book is made epic, engaging and heartfelt by Wouk’s weaving of world historical events into the personal lives of the Henry family members

Herman Wouk's acclaimed novels include the Pulitzer-Prize winning The Caine Mutiny; Marjorie Morningstar; Don't Stop the Carnival; Youngblood Hawke; Inside, Outside; The Hope; and The Glory. The book is made epic, engaging and heartfelt by Wouk’s weaving of world historical events into the personal lives of the Henry family members. The scope and impact of the war is brought home to the reader through the story of each of the Henrys. Wouk, who is remarkably still alive at 102, manages to cover all of the major events of the war, several battles, and the home front.

In 1951, Wouk released his most celebrated novel, "The Caine Mutiny. But his next book looked into domestic matters

In 1951, Wouk released his most celebrated novel, "The Caine Mutiny. It sold slowly at first but eventually topped best-seller lists and won a Pulitzer. For a time, Wouk was compared to other World War II novelists: Norman Mailer, Irwin Shaw, James Jones. But his next book looked into domestic matters. Wouk spoke often of his concern about assimilation and this story told of an aspiring Jewish actress whose real name was Marjorie Morgenstern. Her stage name provided the novel's title, "Marjorie Morningstar. My agent was absolutely appalled," Wouk said.

The Caine Mutiny by Herman Wouk. Herman Wouk’s boldly dramatic, brilliantly entertaining novel of life-and mutiny-on a Navy warship in the Pacific theater was immediately embraced, upon its original publication in 1951, as one of the first serious works of American fiction to grapple with the moral complexities and the human consequences of World War II. Catch-22 by Joseph Heller. Set in the closing months of World War II in an American bomber squadron off the coast of Italy, Catch-22 is the story of a bombardier named Yossarian who is frantic and furious because thousands of people he has.

Books by Herman Wouk. City boy. The caine mutiny. Marjorie morningstar. The two books tell one overarching story-how the American people rose to the challenges of World War II, the first global war, after fearsome setbacks forgotten today in the shining memory of final victory. As I write these words late in October 2001, a new war is just beginning, global again in scope but totally different in character.

These two classic works capture the tide of world events even as they unfold the compelling tale of a single American family drawn into the very center of the war's maelstrom. SUMMARY: The Novel that Inspired the Now-Classic Film The Caine Mutiny and the Hit Broadway Play The Caine Mutiny Court-Martial Herman Wouk's boldly dramatic, brilliantly entertaining novel of life-and mutiny-on a Navy warship in the Pacific theater was immediately embraced, upon its original publication in 1951, as one of the first serious works of American fiction to grapple. with the moral complexities and the human consequences of World War II.


It's so easy
The Caine Mutiny was Herman Wouk’s first post World War II novel. Published in 1951, the novel qualified as contemporary fiction. Sixty-six years later it’s a classic coming-of-age story that reads like historical fiction.
The story isn’t about the U.S.S. Caine or even the ubiquitous Captain Queeg with his ball bearings. The Caine Mutiny is about Willie Keith, a spoiled rich kid who finds himself in a world unlike anything he’s ever known. A world in which he must make a decision that can and does destroy careers.
Willie wants to follow the right path. But which path is that? He could obey the orders of a superior officer, and perhaps go down with his ship. He could believe Lt Keefer’s assessment that the captain is unfit for duty and still obey orders. He could support his friend Lt Maryk, a man with true skills in seamanship. But what does that mean? It could mean dissuading Maryk from taking control of the ship. It could mean supporting Maryk’s decision to do so. And the decision must be made in the middle of a typhoon.
The Caine Mutiny won the Pulitzer Prize in 1951 for good reasons. Wouk’s words effortlessly take the reader aboard the Caine and into World War II mine-sweeping activities. He brings out the stresses of life in close quarters. Even more important, Wouk develops a classic theme as Keith struggles to become a man.
Runehammer
The Caine Mutiny is one of the greatest books I have ever read - and I've read many. I have read this book so often I couldn't put a number to this reality. It is insightful to an extraordinary degree as to the lives and behaviour of people with a special focus on the WW2 Navy. These insights can only have emerged from a man (Herman Wouk) who has lived them. Perhaps he is one of the characters or perhaps all of them given the infinite complexity of what it is to be human especially under the stress of war time pressures. Tom Keefer's likening ( a key character) of his moment of cowardice to that of "Lord Jim" - he refers to himself as "Lord Tom" with his genius like capacity for irony - and its defining impact on his life is overwhelmingly poignant ("Don't forget Willy - I jumped") and might function as a warning to us all.
I could go on but I have learned much about life from this book. It is so important that I have numerous hard copies and a Kindle copy so I can pretty much have it with me wherever I go.
Agarus
This has been my favourite read of 2017. I was surprised at how much I enjoyed the book considering that when I think of naval mutiny I think of the 1990’s movie Crimson Tide, with high drama and intense acting. The Caine Mutiny is at the opposite end of the intensity scale in almost every respect.

This is a long, slow coming of age story in a time of war. We are so used to being entertained by fast paced, action packed movies and books that I sometimes wonder if we have lost an appreciation for things that are a truer reflection of the movement of time. The pace of the story gave the reader a true appreciation of the character development witnessed over the course of the book and of the nature of war. After the fact, it is easy to think of war was a series of battles that were won or lost, but this glosses over the weeks and months of hurry up and wait that fill much of a military man’s life. Wouk captures the interminable endless feeling of war perfectly and likewise startles us with the infrequent, violent nature of battles and storms against this otherwise benign backdrop.

This is all great stuff of course, but what made it a favourite read? Wouk writes charmingly, with familiarity and wit. He always seems to have the perfect word, the perfect little detail to convey a scene to the reader. The story is, of course, the real draw. And more than anything it is the simplicity of the story. It’s the story of Willie Keith growing up in a time of war. The story has a traditional arc that pulls the reader along and all of the supporting characters are fascinating in their own right and support this arc. The angst and trouble that Willie experiences are ordinary and relatable. There is a complete absence of social issues, events and characters to make the story “relevant.” The backdrop of war gives the story context and allows Wouk to use it as prism to break out character, leadership and friendship.

This was a great story with enduring character lessons for us.