Download The Maze: A Novel fb2

by Panos Karnezis
Download The Maze: A Novel fb2
Genre Fiction
  • Author:
    Panos Karnezis
  • ISBN:
    0312423837
  • ISBN13:
    978-0312423834
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Picador (March 1, 2005)
  • Pages:
    376 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Genre Fiction
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1580 kb
  • ePUB format
    1179 kb
  • DJVU format
    1441 kb
  • Rating:
    4.6
  • Votes:
    711
  • Formats:
    lit rtf lrf docx


Set in Anatolia in 1922, The Maze is the story of a retreating Greek brigade that has lost its wa. When the soldiers leave at last, a tragedy has taken place and the town has changed forever.

Set in Anatolia in 1922, The Maze is the story of a retreating Greek brigade that has lost its way. It is pursued by a Turkish army that seeks to avenge three years of Greek occupation. No help is forthcoming. As the army wanders through the Anatolian desert, their internal divisions become more pronounced and their dementias more florid.

The Maze is a novel published by the Greek writer Panos Karnezis in 2004. The book is the story of the nostos of a Greek army brigade in Anatolia trying to make their way back home. The Maze was shortlisted for the 2004 Whitbread First Novel Award. At the end of the Greco-Turkish War, one Greek brigade wanders lost in the Anatolian desert. Led by Brigadier Nestor, the soldiers hope they are marching west toward the Aegean Sea and the end of their disastrous tour of duty

Now Panos Karnezis brings us a fully revised version of his first novel, The Maze, a book that propelled him to the very first rank of young writers

Now Panos Karnezis brings us a fully revised version of his first novel, The Maze, a book that propelled him to the very first rank of young writers. Set in Anatolia in 1922, The Maze is the story of a retreating Greek brigade that has lost its way. As the army wanders through the Anatolian desert, their.

Following Panos Karnezis's well-received volume of short stories, Little Infamies, his first novel boasts high ambitions and a wide canvas - war and its devastating, dizzying after-effects

Following Panos Karnezis's well-received volume of short stories, Little Infamies, his first novel boasts high ambitions and a wide canvas - war and its devastating, dizzying after-effects. It's a life and death situation with distinct echoes of Xenophon. The men are sick, exhausted, short of provisions and, for all they know, their homeland has given them up for dead.

In the summer of 1922, after a series of decisive defeats at the hands of the Turks, the Greek army is in retreat from Asia Minor.

Город: London, EnglandПодписчиков: 85О себе: News etc. from/about novelist and short-. from/about novelist and short-story writer Panos Karnezis.

His second book, The Maze (2004), a novel set in Anatolia in 1922, was shortlisted for t Panos Karnezis was born in Greece in 1967 and came to England in 1992

His second book, The Maze (2004), a novel set in Anatolia in 1922, was shortlisted for t Panos Karnezis was born in Greece in 1967 and came to England in 1992. He studied engineering and worked in industry, then studied for an MA in Creative Writing at the University of East Anglia. His first book, Little Infamies (2002), was a collection of connected short stories set in a nameless Greek village.

Panos Karnezis was born in Greece in 1967 and came to England in 1992. His second book, The Maze (2004), a novel set in Anatolia in 1922, was shortlisted for the 2004 Whitbread First Novel Award and won the Pendleton May First Novel Award. Short stories by Panos Karnezis have been broadcast by BBC Radio 4 and have appeared in Granta, New Writing 11, Prospect, and Areté. His other novels are The Birthday Party (2007, shortlisted for the Encore Award 2009 for the best second novel); The Convent (2010); and The Fugitives (2015).

This first novel confirms Karnezis as one of Britain's most remarkable young authors. His first book, Little Infamies (2002) is a collection of connected short stories set in one nameless Greek village, and his second book, The Maze (2004), is a novel set in Anatolia in 1922. It was shortlisted for the 2004 Whitbread First Novel Award. Short stories by Panos Karnezis have been broadcast by BBC Radio 4 and have appeared in Granta, New Writing 11, Prospect, and Areté

"The bastard love child of 'M*A*S*H' and Shakespeare...Supple prose and perfectly tuned dialogue."--Philip Connors, NewsdayIn the summer of 1922, the Greek army is in retreat from Asia Minor, leaving behind one lost brigade, wandering in the Anatolian desert under a seemingly inexpiable curse. There is the doomed army commander addicted to morphine; the chaplain who induces the commander to strike a bargain with God; the hooker with a heart of gold whom he wants to redeem; a foreign correspondent who can't file stories; a deserter lost and found, and a prize stallion bolted. A debut novel of ambition and charm, The Maze marks the emergence of a stunning young talent whom The New York Times has called "downright miraculous."

Roram
This is a very good book. It provides a great insight into this period of Greek/Turkish history and the moving story is told with great humanity.
Hbr
Panos Karnezis' chief quality as a writer is his keen eye for critical detail. In a few well chosen sentences, he creates powerful characters and moods. This skill is especially important in The Maze where the people he writes about are displaced and disorientated. The feeling of abandonment is tangible throughout this book and well it might be. The first group of characters we are introduced to are a battalion of the defeated Greek Army wandering around inhospitable Anatolia, desperate to find the sea and make their way home. Individually and collectively this group of broken men carry huge burdens of loss, betrayal and remorse. Unexpectedly they find themselves in a small village that has been cut off from the rest of the world for the duration of the war (1919 - 1922). The villagers are divided between the silent, watchful Turks and the more prosperous (mostly) Greek settlers who too are burdened by failure and disappointment. As the village is battered by freakish displays of nature's power, the final scenes are played out. Classical and mythological allusions are woven into the story throughout and in the tradition of grand tragedy, the players finally shuffle off Karnezis' stage and we are left to ponder mankind's impotence in the face of war and retribution that we seem eternally doomed to wage against each other.
Uafrmaine
At the end of the Greco-Turkish War, one Greek brigade wanders lost in the Anatolian desert. Led by Brigadier Nestor, the soldiers hope they are marching toward the sea and the end of their disastrous tour of duty. The war is over, but the men in Panos Karnezis's debut novel, THE MAZE, must battle on.
Brigadier Nestor, an aging career soldier still devastated by his wife's death a year earlier, has become addicted to morphine and Greek mythology. His second-in-command, Chief of Staff Major Porfirio, while appearing to be a model soldier, is keeping a treasonous secret. The company priest, Father Simeon, imagines himself the Apostle of All Anatolians, but in fact is just a thief. And the rest of the brigade is not fairing too well either. Subsisting almost entirely on cornmeal, their morale is low and things are growing stranger the longer they wander.
It seems though that the luck of the brigade is finally changing. First, a Greek pilot crashes from the sky bringing hope that perhaps they are being searched for. Then, following a runaway horse, they come across a quiet village virtually untouched by the war. The inhabitants and tales of the village are just as interesting and complicated as those of the brigade. The mayor is about to marry the madame of the brothel, the church is overrun with rats and the Turkish Muslim quarter is surrounded by an open sewer. This village does not offer the comforts the brigade had longed for. Brigadier Nestor still hopes to lead the men to the sea and escape, and the mayor knows the way. But before they can leave they must all contend with a desperate war correspondent and one final act of violence that permanently scars the village. This act oddly reflects another moment of violence that haunts the brigade and lies just beneath the surface of all they do.
The brigade may finally escape the maze of the Anatolian desert, but each man is forever marred not only by the war but by what has happened since the war ended. The worst casualties may have nothing to do with battle.
Karnezis's debut novel is fantastic. Unlike many war novels, the violence is something that exists for the most part in the margins, coloring the actions of the characters in a subtle and complex way. This story is really about the emotional effects of the war --- feelings of desperation, loneliness, anger, dissatisfaction and, literally and figuratively, wandering lost in the war's aftermath.
Karnezis's writing style is clear and straightforward but without the coldness of, say, a Hemingway novel. The ideas, characters and situations are touched with something so unique that it seems to verge on magical realism, although nothing magical ever takes place. The characters are all realistically flawed. Several are actually quite mad but they remain sympathetic.
THE MAZE offers an interesting commentary on war and aggression and its effects on individuals and communities. This is a recommendable novel and Karnezis is an author to keep an eye on.
--- Reviewed by Sarah Rachel Egelman
Manazar
I read this for my book group, and like the other seven members who read it, found it to be a floridly written and somewhat interesting work that never seems to go anywhere. Part One of the book finds a Greek army unit wandering lost in the Anatolian desert at the tail end of the Greco-Turkish war of 1919-22. (One of the book's minor flaws is that other than a three sentence prologue, it doesn't give the reader any context for what the Greek army is doing in Turkey.) In any event, we meet only a few members of this dispirited unit, who are wandering in circles in the desert in their attempt to evade the Turkish army and make it to the sea, where they will be evacuated. At the head of this ship of fools is Brigadier Nestor, who hides from the world in his books of ancient mythology and vials of morphine. Meanwhile, Major Porfirio, the number two in command, wages a secret Communist propaganda campaign to little effect. Then there is the priest, who left his small parish to pursue his vision of being Apostle to the Anatolians, and is slowly going mad. The bulk of the wandering is shown through their eyes, although a Corporal, the Medic, and a downed pilot also play minor roles. For these first 140 pages, not a lot happens. The unit wanders a few miles a day, they start running low on food and water, and that's about it.

Part Two begins in a local village, and introduces its cast of stock characters. There's the buffoonish mayor who's literally gotten fat off his office. His fiancee, the sophisticated foreign courtesan stuck in this dreary backwater. The schoolmaster, and the shopkeeper, neither of whom make much of an impression, an alcoholic newspaper correspondent, and finally a maidservant and a gardener who emerge as the only two people to really find happiness. The Greek soldiers manage to make it our of the desert and arrive at this town, shaking up the established order. Which makes it sound more exciting than it actually isómake no mistake, this is a slow novel. Events do build up to a fairly tragic climax which never feels fully paid off or legitimate, or even climactic, and the brief epilogue ends things on much more of a whimper than a bang. The overall effect one walks away with is that Karnezis has stiched together a series of unsubtle character studies revolving around the frailty and pitfalls of belief and what it takes to be happy in life.

The writing is a bit of a mixed bag, which at times is very atmospheric, and at times too baroque and overdone. In the same vein, some of the similes are quite nice, but they frequently misfire and occur far too often. Although, it has to be acknowledged that it's quite impressive writing for someone who is writing in their second language. Characters rarely feel alive, and few have distinct voices. There are some nice moments of humor mixed in, gentle comic touches that provide a welcome change from the general defeated tone. Also scattered in are references to Greek mythology, which are footnoted and laboriously explained. There are no doubt, a number of biblical references mixed in as well, but as someone who never read the Bible, they passed me by. On the whole, it's not bad, just not that great, and I would hesitate to recommend it to others.