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by Patrick D'Orazio,Philip Rogers
Download Comes The Dark: A Zombie Novel fb2
Genre Fiction
  • Author:
    Patrick D'Orazio,Philip Rogers
  • ISBN:
    1453701281
  • ISBN13:
    978-1453701287
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform (July 16, 2010)
  • Pages:
    208 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Genre Fiction
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1949 kb
  • ePUB format
    1853 kb
  • DJVU format
    1991 kb
  • Rating:
    4.8
  • Votes:
    981
  • Formats:
    lrf rtf lrf azw


Patrick D'Orazio resides in southwestern Ohio with his wife, Michele, two children, Alexandra and Zachary, and three spastic dogs.

Patrick D'Orazio resides in southwestern Ohio with his wife, Michele, two children, Alexandra and Zachary, and three spastic dogs. He has been writing since he was a teenager but only recently clued into the fact that unless he attempted to get published, no one else would really care.

Comes The Dark, the first book of a trilogy, is Patrick's first novel. com) or kicking around on the boards of The Library of the Living Dead (ww. d. Библиографические данные. Comes the Dark: A Zombie Novel. Patrick D'Orazio, Kody Boye, Philip Robers.

The end came with a whimper, not a bang. While reading D’Orazio’s zombie novel, I kept thinking about the classic zombie films that form the foundation of this beloved genre; well-designed zombies and gore that still put CGI cartoon films to shame are the highlights of the classic Romero and Fulci films. Memorable scenes are ingrained in the consciousness of those who still enjoy them; with D’Orazio’s Comes the Dark, we’re treated to a zombie tale that Tom Savini would be proud of.

THE DARK TRILOGY and Dark stories Patrick D’Orazio The Dark Trilogy By. .Cover art by Philip R. Rogers. Interior formatting by Kody Boye. This book is a work of fiction. People, places, events and situation are the product of the author’s imagination.

Cover art by Philip R. Any resemblance to actual persons, living, dead or undead, or historical events, is purely coincidental.

First time novelist, Patrick D'Orazio, takes us on a journey that follows the path of the everyman, Jeff Blaine, in the days after the end of the world. First time novelist, Patrick D'Orazio, takes us on a journey that follows the path of the everyman, Jeff Blaine, in the days after the end of the world. Six weeks have passed since the virus ravaged the world's population and in that time most of humanity has passed into shadow, turning into corrupt, rotting flesh eaters that known only pain and hunger as they attempt to destroy the remaining members of the human race.

Books related to Comes the Dark. The virus engulfed the world in a matter of days  . Serves as excellent meat and potatoes zombie fiction for fans who like their read bloody. Books related to Comes the Dark.

Read unlimited books and audiobooks on the web, iPad, iPhone and . when I came up with the idea for Comes the Dark.

Read unlimited books and audiobooks on the web, iPad, iPhone and Android. That’s what I wanted to create when I came up with the idea for Comes the Dark.

Coming the Dark tdt-1. The Dark Trilogy 02 - Into the Dark. A lifelong writer, he decided a few years ago that attempting to get published might be a better idea than continuing to toss all those stories he's been scribbling down over the years into a filing cabinet, never to be seen again. Over twenty-five of his short stories appear or will be appearing in various anthologies from a wide array of. different small press publishers.

Written by Patrick D' Orazio, narrated by Jim Cooper. That question sets the first of Patrick D’Orazio’s "Dark Trilogy" in motion as former "soccer dad" Jeff Blaine discovers his will to carry on in the darkness of taking revenge on the monsters who bit his wife and children to death. Jim Cooper provides the rough-edged performance as Blaine discovers other survivors, who, together, band and travel an apocalyptic, bleak, and frightening landscape in pursuit of tiny shreds of hope.

First time novelist, Patrick D'Orazio, takes us on a journey that follows the path of the everyman, Jeff Blaine, in the days after the end of the world. Six weeks have passed since the virus ravaged the world's population and in that time most of humanity has passed into shadow, turning into corrupt, rotting flesh eaters that known only pain and hunger as they attempt to destroy the remaining members of the human race. Jeff has lost everything, including much of his desire to continue surviving in this hell on earth. The idea of lashing out at the monsters who took his life away is the only remaining pleasure left, so Jeff decides to leave his house and destroy as many of the creatures as he can before he is annihilated by them. It doesn't take long for Jeff to discover that he is not alone. Other survivors like Megan, George, and Jason that he finds along his path of self-destruction force him to rethink his plan. They aren't willing to give up just yet-they not only want to survive, they want to live. So as the darkness threatens to consume him, Jeff has to decide if he is willing to keep fighting for himself and the others, or let the bitterness wrapped around his soul destroy him

Mr Freeman
D'Orazio's novel jacks you into the action from the start. The main character, Jeff Blaine, has lost his entire family to the zombie horde and must brutally fight for his life. The action here is riveting and disturbing, and has an immediate impact on the reader. Survival as a theme trumps all else in this book.

Blaine finds another survivor in his neighborhood, Megan, whose gritty personality clashes with his own. But they work together to escape the horde and flee their infected neighborhood. Her goal is to search for other survivors and in the process Jeff appeases her while at the same time becoming a zombie-killing machine hell-bent on winning an almost unwinnable war. Two other survivors join Jeff and Megan, and the four of them take up arms against the horde.

D'Orazio's novel is short but compact. His descriptions are vivid and linger in the imagination long after the reader puts it down. This is the kind of novel that relies more on character and blood-pumping action rather than plot. The action delivers blood and gore at a non-stop pace, barely allowing the reader to catch his or her breath.

I really enjoyed COMES THE DARK and especially the action-packed writing. D'Orazio has split the book up and has added sections at the end that he cut out of the original novel, and these snippets give the reader a more detailed history on the characters' past. My only critique is that the novel ends on a cliffhanger, which we presume will be answered in Book 2. I prefer more a traditional ending that wraps up the novel and provides closure to some degree, but that's my own preference. I highly recommend COMES THE DARK and eagerly look forward to Book 2 in The Dark Trilogy.
JOIN
Spoiler Alert!!!

A good start. Good detail and storyline about a man out for supplies after things go south for humanity. A fairly decent job about what the main is going through when he discovers he is on his own.Some things he does regarding keep sakes of his family seems to be kind of hard to believe. Perhaps it was the shock/ trauma that guided him?

The story can get a little bland now and again but it keeps your attention enough to keep reading. Finding a neighbor that is somewhat of a basket case and having to deal with that was sometimes interesting.

A couple of others he finds adds to the story nicely.

I gave this book 4 stars because it is a first attempt and isn't bad for a first go around.

For the things I didn't like I still couldn't help but feel ok with this story.

The third book in this series I could hardly finish because of the time it took to explain what was going on. Too many words used to describe the here and now of what was happening.
There was some of this in this book but not as much. For this book I would tell others to give it a whirl.It would be a nice edition to your Zombie bookshelf.
Opithris
I read a great many reviews before finally deciding to purchase this title for myself. Some of the reviews were kind and supportive and helpful. Other reviews said more about the reader than the author or his work.

For a first-time novel, I think we can expect a great deal from Mr. D'Orazio's future work. The more I read, the more I wanted to read.

The interesting aspect of this novel is that the characters are not sitting in fortified bunkers, weapons galore at the ready, with supplies sufficient to wait out the plague. Not that I have a problem with such tales, but this is story takes a different tack. This is more in the tradition of George Romero's classic film "Night of the Living Dead", in which people make do with what's available.

The story has no prelude, in the sense of setting up what happened; you land right in the middle of a nightmare -- period. Society has, for all intents and purposes, collapsed, and you've got to go out, baseball bat in hand, to try and find food for you and your family. By the way, as this story adequately reflects, never underestimate the value of a good baseball bat in achieving certain ends.

Plus, it's a good reminder that keeping a few supplies on hand is never a bad thing.

Another refreshing -- and critical -- aspect of this work is the engaging and evolving relationship between two strangers: Jeff and Megan. It's realistic and goes against the grain of the idea that, in such a situation, you would just become best buddies with whomever you found left in the world. Their interactions reflect the pressures and deprivation that their particular personalities are under, as well as their attempts to remember that they have to work together. His early description of Megan is heart rending.

And then there's Mr. D'Orazio's way with descriptions. He clearly has a vivid mind's eye. I mean, "gangrenous congregants" -- how rich is that? As for the reference to dragon urine, well, I'll let readers come across gems like that on their own.

The very beginning of the book did leave me wondering whether the author was going to reach escape velocity in telling his story. He did, though -- and perhaps it's me -- I wasn't clear about Jeff's kids. Could be me. And the author would do well to let reactions and conversations speak for themselves. There is a tendency in the prose to opt for the "What he saw was something out of his worst nightmare." The descriptions that follow that sentence are more than adequate without that somewhat pale sentence. And, as Mr. D'Orazio does an excellent job describing, this shouldn't be a problem for him to show more and tell less.

Is this the best "zombie" story I've ever read? No, but I found the palpable fear, the descriptions, and the situations enjoyable to read. For a first time at bat (pardon the pun) I think this is worthy of four stars.

Do I plan to buy the sequel because I need to know what happens next to Jeff and Megan? You bet.

Keep on writing, Pat.