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by Max Brooks
Download World War Z: An Oral History of the Zombie War fb2
Genre Fiction
  • Author:
    Max Brooks
  • ISBN:
    0307888681
  • ISBN13:
    978-0307888686
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Three Rivers Press; Reprint edition (September 27, 2011)
  • Subcategory:
    Genre Fiction
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1257 kb
  • ePUB format
    1564 kb
  • DJVU format
    1381 kb
  • Rating:
    4.3
  • Votes:
    861
  • Formats:
    azw lrf lrf docx


The Zombie War came unthinkably close to eradicating humanity "World War Z" is the result

The Zombie War came unthinkably close to eradicating humanity. Max Brooks, driven by the urgency of preserving the acid-etched first-hand experiences of the survivors from those apocalyptic years, traveled across the United States of America and throughout the world, from decimated cities that once teemed with upwards of thirty million souls to the most remote and inhospitable areas of the planet. World War Z" is the result.

Voices from the Zombie War The Zombie War came unthinkably close to eradicating humanity. Prepare to be entranced by this addictively readable oral history of the great war between humans and zombies. Will grab you as tightly as a dead man’s fist. A. -Entertainment Weekly, EW Pick. Probably the most topical and literate scare since Orson Welles' War of the Worlds radio broadcast. This is action-packed social-political satire with a global view. Brooks America’s most prominent maven on the living dead.

Science Fiction, Horror ) The Zombie War came unthinkably close to eradicating humanity. Max Brooks, driven by the urgency. This record of the greatest conflict in human history owes its genesis to a much smaller, much more personal conflict between me and the chairperson of the United Nation’s Postwar Commission Report. My initial work for the Commission could be described as nothing short of a labor of love.

The Zombie War came unthinkably close to eradicating humanity. Max Brooks, driven by the urgency of preserving the acid-etched first-hand experiences of the survivors from those apocalyptic years, traveled across the United States of America and throughout the world, from decimated cities that once teemed with upwards of thirty million souls to the most remote and The Zombie War came unthinkably close to eradicating humanity.

Science Fiction, Horror ) The Zombie War came unthinkably close to eradicating humanity

Science Fiction, Horror ) The Zombie War came unthinkably close to eradicating humanity. When Travis D’Ambrosia became chairman of the Joint Chiefs, he not only invented the resource-to-kill ratio, but developed a comprehensive strategy to employ it. I always listened to him when he told me a certain weapons system was vital. I trusted his opinion in matters like the new Battle Dress Uniform or the Standard Infantry Rifle.

World War Z: An Oral History of the Zombie War is a 2006 zombie apocalyptic horror novel written by American author Max Brooks. Other passages record a decade-long desperate struggle, as experienced by people of various nationalities

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From bestselling author Max Brooks, the riveting story of the highly decorated, barrier-breaking, historic black regiment-the Harlem HellfightersIn 1919, the 369th infantry regiment marched home triumphantly from World War I. They had spent more time in. Zombies: Encounters with the Hungry Dead. brains! Experience the indispensable series that defines the very best in zombie literature with a shambling, ravenous herd of original stories.

A conversation with max brooks. World War Z is one of the biggest selling original zombie novels of all time. Talk about its genesis, including your discussions with the publisher over the title. I’d written a book on how to survive zombies that I called The Zombie Survival Guide, so when writing a book about a worldwide war against zombies, why not call it Zombie War.

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Soon to be a major motion picture!The Zombie War came unthinkably close to eradicating humanity. Max Brooks, driven by the urgency of preserving the acid-etched first-hand experiences of the survivors from those apocalyptic years, traveled across the United States of America and throughout the world, from decimated cities that once teemed with upwards of thirty million souls to the most remote and inhospitable areas of the planet. He recorded the testimony of men, women, and sometimes children who came face-to-face with the living, or at least the undead, hell of that dreadful time. World War Z is the result. Never before have we had access to a document that so powerfully conveys the depth of fear and horror, and also the ineradicable spirit of resistance, that gripped human society through the plague years. Ranging from the now infamous village of New Dachang in the United Federation of China, where the epidemiological trail began with the twelve-year-old Patient Zero, to the unnamed northern forests where untold numbers sought a terrible and temporary refuge in the cold, to the United States of Southern Africa, where the Redeker Plan provided hope for humanity at an unspeakable price, to the west-of-the-Rockies redoubt where the North American tide finally started to turn, this invaluable chronicle reflects the full scope and duration of the Zombie War. Most of all, the book captures with haunting immediacy the human dimension of this epochal event. Facing the often raw and vivid nature of these personal accounts requires a degree of courage on the part of the reader, but the effort is invaluable because, as Mr. Brooks says in his introduction, “By excluding the human factor, aren’t we risking the kind of personal detachment from history that may, heaven forbid, lead us one day to repeat it? And in the end, isn’t the human factor the only true difference between us and the enemy we now refer to as ‘the living dead’?” Note: Some of the numerical and factual material contained in this edition was previously published under the auspices of the United Nations Postwar Commission. Eyewitness reports from the first truly global war “I found ‘Patient Zero’ behind the locked door of an abandoned apartment across town. . . . His wrists and feet were bound with plastic packing twine. Although he’d rubbed off the skin around his bonds, there was no blood. There was also no blood on his other wounds. . . . He was writhing like an animal; a gag muffled his growls. At first the villagers tried to hold me back. They warned me not to touch him, that he was ‘cursed.’ I shrugged them off and reached for my mask and gloves. The boy’s skin was . . . cold and gray . . . I could find neither his heartbeat nor his pulse.” —Dr. Kwang Jingshu, Greater Chongqing, United Federation of China “‘Shock and Awe’? Perfect name. . . . But what if the enemy can’t be shocked and awed? Not just won’t, but biologically can’t! That’s what happened that day outside New York City, that’s the failure that almost lost us the whole damn war. The fact that we couldn’t shock and awe Zack boomeranged right back in our faces and actually allowed Zack to shock and awe us! They’re not afraid! No matter what we do, no matter how many we kill, they will never, ever be afraid!” —Todd Wainio, former U.S. Army infantryman and veteran of the Battle of Yonkers “Two hundred million zombies. Who can even visualize that type of number, let alone combat it? . . . For the first time in history, we faced an enemy that was actively waging total war. They had no limits of endurance. They would never negotiate, never surrender. They would fight until the very end because, unlike us, every single one of them, every second of every day, was devoted to consuming all life on Earth.” —General Travis D’Ambrosia, Supreme Allied Commander, EuropeFrom the Hardcover edition.

Cel
I got this book to prepare for an end-of-the-world class in my Mythology course, despite not being much of a zombie fan, but ended up loving it. This book is nothing at all like the movie, and that's a good thing. As others have commented, it's told as individual stories told years after the events, and the characterization, and the thought about military, medical, and social implications are all compelling. There is some unexpected interweaving of stories as well. The narrators are from different places, professions, perspectives, and lifestyles, and the zombies are more like the zombies we know and sorta love since Night of the Living Dead. Definitely for the intelligent zombie fans, in particular in offering strategic ideas to those who, like my daughter, keep plywood, hammer and nails handy in case it becomes necessary to board up our windows when the zombies come.
Kelerius
Really enjoyed this book! I had seen the movie and enjoyed it but left with lots of questions. I was intrigued with the more mundane type of questions about a world with such zombies. How did things get this bad initially? How did people survive? I wanted to know more of the surrounding universe to a degree and this book delivered.

It is not at all like the movie with a main character on some quest to save the world. It follows many different groups and people as they struggle with the outbreak of the global pandemic. It can be hard to follow sometimes with so many different people and situations going on but it is quite interesting. It presents a great picture of so many different countries and groups and their experiences combating or losing to the zombies. It is an amazing change of pace from what you would see as a traditional zombie/pandemic/world-ending event book. You get a sense of all the struggles and hard decisions that such an event would bring about. It's not some super hero or special agent saving the world. It's about regularly people struggling to survive and society coming together to combat the greatest enemy humanity has ever known.
terostr
I have to start by admitting it was difficult for me to get into this book at first but I'm so happy I stuck with it for a few stories. It's very different to me to begin in the middle of a story that the storyteller knows and the reader doesn't, but after a few entries it is so compelling to find out the history of the war from so many perspectives at so many points in time. The author does an amazing job at bringing a believable voice to narrators from all places, perspectives and walks of life. Some stories are stronger than others but none were boring to me. Some stories were so powerful and I imagine individual readers will identify and attach to each story differently. I really think there is something here for everyone. Although it begins with a story of "patient zero" the book is not on an entirely linear time table so be prepared to jump around in the history of the war. The author creates such a believable wartime picture through the people you get to meet and the details that it feels very real despite its premise. I especially liked experiencing the details of each story through the storyteller. You see each situation through their education level, job, age, life experience, prejudices, strengths and geography which keeps the book fresh throughout. A note about the film, it's not really a true adaptation at all, it's a fairly run of the mill zombie popcorn film. If you love the book, maybe don't take your expectations from the book into the movie and it may still be a fun watch but it does not have the power and interest of the book by a long shot. It mainly just shares a title and a skeleton of the story, kind of like reading The Serpent and the Rainbow and then seeing the movie by the same name. I would love to see World War Z made into a TV mini series and faithfully adapted, with each episode introduced at the start of the person being interviewed and showing their own personal story.
Chillhunter
This was an interesting, fairly entertaining read. The concept was clever, it was set up as an "oral history" of a great zombie war that almost wiped out the human race. Short "interviews" built the story from how the war started and what happened during in various countries at various times. The authors used this brief interview format to introduce a range of characters, many of who can be readily mapped onto current political figures and celebrities. The reason I give it only 3 stares is because I ended up thinking it sort ran out of gas about 2/3 of the way through. I was ready for it to be over, the stories got a little less interesting and, frankly at times simply boring. Edited down it would have been stronger.
Fohuginn
The movie was so disappointing compared to the book. I read the book and then listened to the audiobook version as well. Mark Hammil is great on that. This book really does a great job telling a complete story from the perspective of different narrators. I think this is the best zombie book I have read and lament the fact the movie pales in comparison. Pick this up if you aren't burn out on zombies by this point in the millennium