Download The Fall of Troy fb2

by Peter Ackroyd
Download The Fall of Troy fb2
Genre Fiction
  • Author:
    Peter Ackroyd
  • ISBN:
    0701179112
  • ISBN13:
    978-0701179113
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Random House; First Edition edition (2006)
  • Pages:
    224 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Genre Fiction
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1606 kb
  • ePUB format
    1339 kb
  • DJVU format
    1290 kb
  • Rating:
    4.7
  • Votes:
    771
  • Formats:
    lit lrf rtf doc


Also by peter ackroyd. I cannot wait to bring you to the plain of Troy. To show you the place where Hector and Achilles fought. To show you the palace of Priam.

Also by peter ackroyd. One. He fell down heavily on his knees, took her hand and brought it up to his mouth. I kiss the hand of the future Mrs. Obermann.

2006 The Fall of Troy. 2008 The Casebook of Victor Frankenstein

For the British academic, see Peter Ackroyd (Biblical scholar). From 2003 to 2005, Ackroyd wrote a six-book non-fiction series (Voyages Through Time), intended for readers as young as eight, his first work for children. The critically acclaimed series-described as "Not just sound-bite snacks for short attention spans, but unfolding feasts that leave you with a sense of wonder" by The Sunday Times is an extensive narrative of key periods in world history. 2006 The Fall of Troy. 2008 The Casebook of Victor Frankenstein. 2009 The Canterbury Tales – A Retelling.

In The Fall of Troy, acclaimed novelist and historian Peter Ackroyd creates a fascinating narrative that follows an archaeologist's obsession with finding the ruins of Troy.

Peter Ackroyd's tale of a lost city's rediscovery, The Fall of Troy, is delightfully ingenious, says Barry .

Peter Ackroyd's tale of a lost city's rediscovery, The Fall of Troy, is delightfully ingenious, says Barry Unsworth. It is Peter Ackroyd's remarkable achievement, in this complex and fascinating novel, to take a figure who was already a legend in his own lifetime, and recreate him as a creature of myth; indeed, an epic hero, able to shape truth to his vision, to call on the powers of the gods still residing among the ruins of the city.

In The Fall of Troy, acclaimed novelist and historian Peter Ackroyd creates a fascinating narrative that follows an archaeologist's obsession with finding the ruins of Troy, depicting the blurred line between truth an. .

In The Fall of Troy, acclaimed novelist and historian Peter Ackroyd creates a fascinating narrative that follows an archaeologist's obsession with finding the ruins of Troy, depicting the blurred line between truth and deception. Obermann, an acclaimed German scholar, fervently believes that his discovery of the ancient ruins of Troy will prove that the heroes of the Iliad, a work he has cherished all his life, actually existed

Peter Ackroyd belongs to another age. The author of more than a dozen novels, as well as volumes of poetry . Ackroyd’s portrayal of Obermann is the triumph of The Fall of Troy

Peter Ackroyd belongs to another age. The author of more than a dozen novels, as well as volumes of poetry, plays and miscellaneous works of nonfiction, he recalls a time when it was commonplace for writers not merely to be prolific but to exhibit a sometimes bewildering catholicity of interest. Ackroyd’s portrayal of Obermann is the triumph of The Fall of Troy. A wealthy German businessman whose mercantile adventurings have taken him to Russia and America, he has revered the Greek world since his childhood. Archaeology interests him only to the degree that it is a means of finding evidence for the truth of Homer’s epics.

The Fall of Troy book.

Peter Ackroyd (born 5 October 1949, East Acton, London) is an English author. Ackroyd's mother worked in the personnel department of an engineering firm, and his father left the family home when Peter Ackroyd was a baby

Peter Ackroyd (born 5 October 1949, East Acton, London) is an English author. Ackroyd has always shown a great interest in the city of London, and one of his best known works, "London: The Biography", is an extensive and thorough discussion of London through the ages. Ackroyd's mother worked in the personnel department of an engineering firm, and his father left the family home when Peter Ackroyd was a baby. He was reading newspapers at the age of 5 and wrote a play about Guy Fawkes, aged nine.

by. Ackroyd, Peter, 1949-. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. SIMILAR ITEMS (based on metadata) play Play All. Terms of Service (last updated 12/31/2014).

Exciting Novel!

Laitchai
I'm a fan forever. Great read.
Usanner
A most interesting approach. A definite villian, an interesting heroine, and a surprising tale of what "might" have happened on the excavation of Troy.
Mr_Mole
I very much enjoyed Peter Ackroyd's short novel The Fall of Troy. A reader's enjoyment will be enhanced by knowledge of the real-life character of Heinrich Schliemann who serves as the springboard for the fictional archaeologist Obermann in the book. I first read of Schliemann in Irving Stone's biographical novel The Greek Treasure. While Irving Stone's book was a solid biographical novel, Ackroyd's book is at turns comic, mythic, suspenseful and gothic as various characters unearth a multilayered city at Hisarlik, Turkey.

Obermann is a great character and I never knew quite how to respond to him - was he a genius, a fraud, a thief, a menace or a visionary? Ackroyd gives life and vivid characterizations to Obermann's wife Sophia, a British archaeologist, a blind scholar and to the landscape itself, making the trees and rocks resound with the echoes of the Greek gods.

The Fall of Troy is a fascinating read for those interested in Greek mythology, the Iliad or the life of Heinrich Schliemann.
Nothing personal
Heinrich Schliemann discovered Troy, that much I knew. I had always assumed him to be some dusty nineteenth-century German professor, treading in the footsteps of the illustrious Goethe. But no. As I now see from Wikipedia, he was a wealthy amateur, opportunist, and rogue. He was German born, yes, but worked mostly in Russia and America, where he became an American citizen; he was a polylinguist, speaking fourteen languages at the time of his death. He made his first million, possibly fraudulently, in the California Gold Rush, and multiplied it several times over by cornering parts of the armaments market in the Crimean War. He retired from business in his later forties and moved to Athens to pursue his passion: to rediscover the ancient sites described by Homer. Divorcing his Russian wife, he married a Greek girl thirty years his junior named Sophia Engastromenos. His excavations at the hill of Hissarlik, on the Turkish side of the Hellespont, revealed a history of ancient cities, built on top of one another over the course of several millennia. As skilled in self-promotion as he was lucky in archaeology, Schliemann made himself a world-famous figure, while further enhancing his private wealth with treasures smuggled from the site.

Most of this finds its way into Ackroyd's compact novel, at least as background. At first, only the surnames are changed: meet Heinrich Obermann and Sophia Chrysanthis, beautifully apt monikers for the megalomaniac archaeologist and his golden bride. It is an arranged marriage, but Sophia is swept away by the energy and enthusiasm of her husband, by the sheer scale of his excavations, and by his pagan conviction that they have been chosen by the gods to walk again in their ancient footsteps; there is a beautiful chapter in which they ride up the slopes of Mount Ida to visit the glade where Paris chose between the goddesses Hera, Athene, and Aphrodite. Heinrich, who knows much of Homer by memory, works largely by instinct, feeling the presence of ancient civilizations in the air around him and the ground under his feet, and apparently being mostly right. When visiting experts from Harvard or the British Museum raise some tentative questions about proof, Heinrich merely puts his hand to his heart, saying that he has all the proof he needs right there.

As the novel proceeds, it becomes clear why Ackroyd has changed the names. He needs to develop the larger-than-life Heinrich in his own way, bringing events to conclusions that have no basis in history, but are nonetheless deeply rooted in character. Sophia proves remarkably competent in helping with the excavations, offering insights of her own, and serving as a charming mediator between her husband and those irritating visitors. But she also becomes aware that her husband is keeping secrets from her: not merely the valuable finds he conceals from their Turkish overseer, but also facts about his own history that she discovers only by accident. And when a young English paleontologist comes to the site to work on what appear to be tablets inscribed with writing, and his conclusions threaten to disprove everything that Heinrich had so fervently believed, events move to a climax that is both understated and devastating. Not for nothing is this novel called the Fall of Troy. It is hard not to weep for the loss to science that Heinrich's bull-in-a-china-shop attitudes incur; similar charges were raised against Schliemann. Yet what we end with is the radiance of Heinrich's vision, and of Homer's epic blazing through him. Heinrich -- whether Obermann or Schliemann -- may have been a rogue, but he certainly was a glorious one.
Rainshaper
I have read many biographies and nonfiction books by Mr. Ackroyd and was excited to try a novel. I am sorry to say I was not as enthralled as I hoped in this particular story. Sophia is a 16-year-old Greek girl who is wooed by the famous Herr Obermann to be his wife. Her family is delighted for her to go off with him to the archaeological site of Troy, which he recently uncovered.

Mr. Obermann is a difficult man to like because he has set ideas and anything that proves to be different than his beliefs are destroyed or ignored. Another archaeologist arrives whose study takes him in a different direction from Obermann and Sophia is caught between the men.

That is the basic plot of this book. My problems with this story are that it is hard to know what is based on facts and what is total fiction. I also had a hard time liking any of the characters although it was easy to like Sophia, especially at the end of the novel.

If you enjoy archaeology and Troy especially, you will probably enjoy this novel. I just had a hard time getting through it.

I borrowed this book from my local library.