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by Tanya Eby,Dean Koontz
Download The Eyes of Darkness fb2
Genre Fiction
  • Author:
    Tanya Eby,Dean Koontz
  • ISBN:
    1441817166
  • ISBN13:
    978-1441817167
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Brilliance Audio; Unabridged edition (January 3, 2010)
  • Subcategory:
    Genre Fiction
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1872 kb
  • ePUB format
    1152 kb
  • DJVU format
    1634 kb
  • Rating:
    4.7
  • Votes:
    501
  • Formats:
    mobi lrf txt mbr


Koontz-Alert Checklist (Every Dean Koontz book has at least one of the following things. The Eyes of Darkness, whose title makes zero sense in context, was originally published under Koontz's pseudonym Leigh Nichols

Koontz-Alert Checklist (Every Dean Koontz book has at least one of the following things. The Eyes of Darkness, whose title makes zero sense in context, was originally published under Koontz's pseudonym Leigh Nichols. In the late 90s, Koontzy-boy took some time off rewriting the same Koontz story over and over again to rewrite some of his pen names' books over and over again. Those books include: Shadowfires, The Key to Midnight, The House of Thunder, The Servants of Twilight, and this one righ'chere. Why did he do such a thing?

The Eyes of Darkness. Written by Dean Koontz. Dean Koontz is one of my favourite contemporary authors, so it was a major let down for me to discover that The Eyes of Darkness was a disappointing read

The Eyes of Darkness. Dean Koontz is one of my favourite contemporary authors, so it was a major let down for me to discover that The Eyes of Darkness was a disappointing read. The story begins with the death of young Danny Evans in an accident that also took the lives of many other school aged boys while on an excursion in the mountains.

Berkley titles by Dean Koontz. The eyes of darkness. No part of this book may be reproduced, scanned, or distributed in any printed or electronic form without permission.

The Eyes of Darkness Audio CD – Audiobook, Unabridged. I really enjoyed reading this book as I do with almost all of Dean Koontz books, however the ending was a little too abrupt and I thought there was room for another few words to explain the main characters getaway. by Dean R. Koontz (Author), Tanya Eby (Narrator, Performer). I also didn't realise that Dean had written this originally under a pseudonym. Not that it matters of course because it was a gripping read up to Mr Koontz usual excellent standard.

This was the first time she’d ever had the need to tap those stores for herself. At her request, Elliot poured Rémy Martin into two snifters and gave one glass to her. She couldn’t pour for them. because her hands were shaking too badly. They sat on the beige sofa, more in the shadows than in the glow from the lamps. She was forced to hold her brandy snifter in both hands to keep it steady. I don’t know where to begin. I guess I ought to start with Danny. Do you know about Danny?.

Written by Dean Koontz, Audiobook narrated by Tanya Eby. Sign-in to download and listen to this audiobook today! . The Vision - one of Dean Koontz’ early novels - is a chilling look into the paranormal and what occurs when a psychic channels the mind of a crazed killer

The Vision - one of Dean Koontz’ early novels - is a chilling look into the paranormal and what occurs when a psychic channels the mind of a crazed killer.

Perfect for fans of Stephen King and Richard Laymon. Dean Koontz is a prose stylist whose lyricism heightens malevolence and tension.

The Eyes of Darkness. Suddenly the sky was shattered by lightning, then by a hard clap of thunder, and the night imploded into a deeper darkness, into infinite and perfect blackness

The Eyes of Darkness. Praise for Dean Koontz and his masterworks of suspense. Koontz barely lets the reader come up for air between terrors. The Washington Post. Koontz’s skill at edge-of-the-seat writing has improved with each book. He can scare our socks off. - Boston Herald. Suddenly the sky was shattered by lightning, then by a hard clap of thunder, and the night imploded into a deeper darkness, into infinite and perfect blackness. Tina Evans sat straight up in bed, certain that she had heard a noise in the house. It hadn’t been merely the thunder from the dream.

A year had passed since little Danny’s death—a year since his mother began the painful process of acceptance. But Tina Evans could have sworn she just saw her Danny in a stranger’s car…then she dreamed that Danny was alive. And when she awoke, she found a message waiting for her in Danny’s bedroom—two disturbing words scrawled on his chalkboard: NOT DEAD.


Was this someone’s grim joke? Her mind playing tricks on her? Or something…more? For Tina Evans, it was a mystery she couldn’t escape. An obsession that would lead her from the bright lights of Las Vegas to the cold shadows of the High Sierras. A terrible secret seen only by…The Eyes of Darkness



Gerceytone
The Eyes of Darkness (TEOD) is a revamped version of a much earlier book by Koontz, writing under the pseudonym Leigh Nichols, from 1981. I was still in high school and had never heard of the book, nor Leigh Nichols, nor Dean Koontz. It was 1987 when I discovered Watchers and scrambled to find anything he had written previously. Like many others, I also became a fan. According to TEOD's afterward, this is the last of five books he has reissued (writing under the Nichols' name) that has been updated and slightly edited to be more relevant in the 21st century.

TEOD is an utter treat. While a few areas stumbled here and there, the narrative, protagonists, antagonists, the minor characters, settings, dialogue, were all interesting without being overly wordy. This was the Koontz I remembered from 1987 onward. Not the current dreck he seems to spit out about twice a year. I found paragraphs in TEOD that ranged from 2 sentences to a whole page, with descriptions of everything from the cold, short winter days to the smells of a small-town diner to the evergreens on a snow-capped mountaintop. You actually felt like you stepped into the world his imagination had created for you.

And while TEOD's plot involved a cold war-era meme reminiscent of the '70s and passed on into the early '80s, he was able to update the book to make it seem more relevant for today's times. You could feel the mother's anguish, confusion, and eventual anger: She was the Ripley from Aliens before we had a Ripley from Aliens.

But don't let the cold-war sub-plot put you off. Koontz ties up that theme where it's within one's reach of believability. Just imagine the feeling you get when you watch a 007 movie from the early '80s and giggle over how silly those plots were (compared to the recent Bond films with Daniel Craig). TEOD might give you that feeling of déjà vu, sans the chuckling.

Even though I know how his other book, Strangers, ends as well as the underlying plot, reading TEOD made me want to go out and find a used version of that book, or maybe Lightning, or The Bad Place. That's the other déjà vu you get. Wow, what a great writer Koontz was. The last book I read by him before TEOD was What the Night Knows: A Novel. Though not reviewed yet by me, I'd give that one 2.5 stars. It's probably one of the few books in the last decade that I enjoyed, until it went off the rails and into the supernatural. The closest Koontz comes to the supernatural are his Odd Thomas books, a blatant knockoff of The Sixth Sense (Collector's Edition Series), in my humble opinion.

I also just finished another re-issue of an earlier book, The Voice of the Night, he wrote under another pen name in 1979 that was pure simplicity and sheer joy. Like TEOD, there was no preaching, no wearing one's faith on one's sleeve, no pandering to the reader, no silly dialogue just for the sake of having dialogue. Everything had a purpose, every sentence had a meaning, every character relatable, and when not, their actions understandable.

I give TEOD 4.5 stars but Amazon doesn't do half stars for some reason. I highly recommend this book. It's a classic Koontz thriller and you won't be disappointed.
iSlate
I very much enjoy some of Koontz' work. This is not one of Koontz' best novels. Plot is simplistic and character development very one dimensional. While the premise is somewhat interesting, the execution disappoints. The "poltergeist" element and "evil government using children for science" messages explored in a very clichéd fashion. The relationship/chemistry between the two protagonists is stilted and cardboard like at best. Not up to some of Koontz' later work. There is a great deal of potential in Danny, the protagonist's son, but any opportunity to explore the intricacies of the treatment impact on Danny's brain and abilities is thwarted in favor of a limiting sci-fi/thriller/political commentary narrative.
Kakashkaliandiia
The first Dean Koontz book I read many years ago. After reading this book, I went on to read every Dean Koontz book published. This book is a story of a young mother, whose young son has been dead for a year. She begins to experience things that are frightful and unexplained. She begins to believe that her son is not dead and actively starts to delve into the circumstances of his death. Fantastic read. I read it twice and now I have it in my Kindle.
Ballardana
You don't notice how much better an author gets year to year until you go back and read an old title. The storyline here is good, and it's a good read, but the intricate, intimate use if words that makes you admire each paragraph if a Koontz novel is not evident here. Also, the spirituality is not as developed as in Odd Thomas or any of Koontz's newer titles. Good read, but don't expect a 2014-type writing style.
Yndanol
Dean Koontz always manages to keep me keenly glued to his books. His stories are scary but he never fails to weave family values like faith, trust, strength of character and love through them. In the end, those qualities defeat the evil powers. You also have no doubt how much he loves dogs, especially golden retreivers, because there is usually at least one referred to in his stories. Love this author!
Quphagie
It's not a full sized hardback, I knew it was used but I didn't expect it to be a book club size, I even looked at the measurements because my sister only collects the full sized volumes. This will work until I can find a replacement.
Orll
Easy purchase. Arrived in great condition. I am pleased with my purchase and I'd order again.
True to His talent, Mr Koontz has done it again. His wit, his plot twists, his character development is unsurpassed. I thoroughly enjoyed the book, and I am sure that any reader that likes a bit of fantasy bound with an excellent plot will enjoy this tale as much as I did.