Download Bone House fb2

by Betsy Tobin
Download Bone House fb2
Genre Fiction
  • Author:
    Betsy Tobin
  • ISBN:
    0743406168
  • ISBN13:
    978-0743406161
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Scribner (March 1, 2002)
  • Pages:
    224 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Genre Fiction
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1469 kb
  • ePUB format
    1588 kb
  • DJVU format
    1633 kb
  • Rating:
    4.1
  • Votes:
    217
  • Formats:
    lrf mobi rtf azw


The emetic Lucius administered yesterday has left her greatly weakened, her pallor is pasty, and when she turns to me, I can see that her eyes have difficulty focusing.

The emetic Lucius administered yesterday has left her greatly weakened, her pallor is pasty, and when she turns to me, I can see that her eyes have difficulty focusing. I stand frozen in the doorway. Who is there? she calls out to the darkness, for her curtains remain drawn from the night. It is only me, mum, I announce, and enter the room, placing the tray on the table by the window

Set in seventeenth-century rural England, BONE HOUSE is the tale of two women. One is large, voluptuous and charismatic – a prostitute to whom many, not just men, are drawn

Set in seventeenth-century rural England, BONE HOUSE is the tale of two women. One is large, voluptuous and charismatic – a prostitute to whom many, not just men, are drawn. The other is young, slight and solitary – a servant whose quest to solve the mystery of the prostitute's death leads her to shocking discoveries, unexpected love, and the beginnings of a future. Gothic, elegant, sensual, and fiercely compelling, BONE HOUSE is an uncommonly assured debut. Historical Detectives Thriller & Crime.

Read online books written by Betsy Tobin in our e-reader absolutely for free. Books by Betsy Tobin: Bone House. Author of Bone House, Crimson China at ReadAnyBook.

Betsy Tobin has created a marvelously dark, Gothic atmosphere in Bone House. Although I can't say it's a book that I'll recommend to friends, Bone House is a well-written and absorbing Gothic mystery. The writing is exceptional enough that I might give Tobin another chance.

In this stunning debut, Betsy Tobin spins a classic tale of gothic suspense. In this stunning debut, Betsy Tobin spins a classic tale of gothic suspense. Immersing readers in Elizabethan England, she masterfully evokes a heady place where science and superstition walk hand-in-hand and sensuality and violence are masked by the merest veneer of gentility. some people are the center of their world, and others are the spokes.

Bone House is a wonderuful and moving novel, with an. .a fine gothic novel which burrows under the skin' THE TIMES.

Bone House is a wonderuful and moving novel, with an assured grasp of character, story and history. It deals with the sort of people normally ignored by historians and historical novelists alike, and brings to life the poor and the marginal of the past without ever sentimentalising them. Betsy Tobin has skillfully portrayed life in a 17th-century English village as well as written a compelling mystery. The maid's voice is deceptively clear, the plot subtly twisty-turny, and the results are poignant and gripping' Tracy Chevalier, author of GIRL WITH A PEARL EARRING.

Bone House - Betsy Tobin. The narrative flows effortlessly, and the prose is imaginative and picturesque. Betsy Tobin has created a marvelously dark, Gothic atmosphere in Bone House.

Bone House" is a novel dealing with raw human emotions and passions where Dora, a woman who lived by selling her body also had the compelling power of drawing people to her. Dora's mysterious death sparks a whole lot of controversies when it's realized that Dora was pregnant when she died. She had said that the child would kill her, making people believe that the Devil had fathered her child.

Bone house : a novel. New York : Washington Square Press : Published by Pocket Books. by. Tobin, Betsy, 1961-. inlibrary; printdisabled; ; china. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books.

In this stunning debut, Betsy Tobin spins a classic tale of gothic suspense. Immersing readers in Elizabethan England, she masterfully evokes a heady place where science and superstition walk hand-in-hand and sensuality and violence are masked by the merest veneer of gentility. ...some people are the center of their world, and others are the spokes. The center of one village was Dora, the great-bellied prostitute whose lush curves gave solace to men even as her compassion and honesty drew the company of women. So when Dora is found dead in an icy ravine, her loss impacts everyone. So, too, does it torment a young chambermaid at the Great House. Determined to discover the truth, she ?nds that Dora left behind many unanswered questions, along with a huge, slow-witted son, a boy of eleven trapped in a man's body. The deeper she digs, the more the mystery of Dora's life is revealed, until a terrible secret is laid bare.

Otiel
Set in 17th century England, Tobin's "Bone House" spins a tale of village intrigue in the time when witches were believed to be real and people were easily afraid. She gives us an enjoyable and light read . . . but the book lacks verisimilitude when it comes to interclass relations . . . The mistress of a 17th century Great House would never have attempted to partner her son and heir with her maid, no matter how desperate she was to see her son married off. Nor would a ladies maid be likely to have the freedom of movement within and without the house that Tobin's protagonist does. The ending was predictable, as was the romantic involvement. One step away from a romance novel, one step away from historical fiction . . . this book stands on its own, and will probably be attractive to readers of both genres. If you're seeking something with a bit more meat, I suggest you look elsewhere.
lucky kitten
I bought this book in a thrift store for a quarter and was swiftly drawn into the story. Not knowing much about 17th century England, I cannot speak to the author's accuracy, but the details she chose created compelling scenes that evoked a time long gone. The author's style of writing is elegant. I was greatly intrigued about a town where so many people loved Dora, a larger-than-life woman who came from another land and settled in their realm, had sexual relations with a number of the men, was a good friend to many of the women, and not judged for her unconventional life. Indeed, many revered her. I also cared for the narrator. I was left a little dissatisfied with the ending, but not extremely so. I think I wanted Dora to have had a more intriguing background when all was revealed at the end. I would recommend this book and will look for other books by this author.
Whitescar
This is not the usual mystery story. The heroine, a waiting lady in the "Big House" in a small rural village, is not a sleuth nor particularly proactive in trying to solve the mystery of the suspicious death of the town's prostitute. But she does ask the right questions and works things out on her own. This serves her well when the prostitute's body is taken from her grave and later found with her almost born fetus cut from her. The heroine's mother, an unmarried midwife and healer, is accused of the deed and of witchcraft stemming from beliefs linking midwifery to consorting with the devil. It is not the first time the village has tried an older defenseless women for witchcraft and, to test her guilt, ducked her repeatedly in the village pond until she finally succumbed.

The story's strength lies in the minute descriptions of the work of rural women as well as details about period dress and makeup. It is also a story about the almost mystical attraction both women and men had to the larger than life, story telling, mother earth figure which the prostitute came to represent. She was "welcoming to all," and "men were drawn to her for pleasure; women for friendship." Social hierarchy also is shown between the master and servants of the "The Great House" (the manor), and between the servants themselves. What works less well is the mostly first person present tense voice of the heroine, who is never given a name. Her language and sophisticated, indeed literary, thoughts seem beyond the scope of a young, semi-literate woman of limited experience.

This is the author's first book. No historical background.
Goldcrusher
I love the premise of Bone House. I mean, COME ON! From the description, doesn't it sound complex and interesting? Well, unfortunately I have very little to say about it. I hate it when I read something that leaves me so completely ambivalent that I'm not even sure how I feel about the book.

The writing was beautiful, painting a hauntingly accurate picture of Gothic England. On the other hand, the descriptions were a bit much for me at times - rape, persecution of so-called witches, incest, mutilation - Bone House was interesting, but the some of the chilling details were just plain sickening.

After plodding through, determined to finish the book, I was completely disappointed by the ending. As I sit writing this, days later, I am still left unsatisfied by the author's choices. I did not care for the element of romance Tobin attempted to add to the story. It felt disjointed and just confused things for me.

Despite the fact that I didn't care for the story, I cannot bad-mouth the writing - Tobin is wonderfully original and artistic. The narrative flows effortlessly, and the prose is imaginative and picturesque. Betsy Tobin has created a marvelously dark, Gothic atmosphere in Bone House. Although I can't say it's a book that I'll recommend to friends, Bone House is a well-written and absorbing Gothic mystery. The writing is exceptional enough that I might give Tobin another chance. Her novel Ice Land looks interesting...