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by Grant Francis Allen
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Genre Fiction
  • Author:
    Grant Francis Allen
  • ISBN:
    1606208519
  • ISBN13:
    978-1606208519
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Forgotten Books (October 14, 2008)
  • Pages:
    190 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Genre Fiction
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1370 kb
  • ePUB format
    1451 kb
  • DJVU format
    1128 kb
  • Rating:
    4.2
  • Votes:
    798
  • Formats:
    rtf lit doc mobi


First published in 1897. 1. The Episode of the Mexican Seer. I examined the book with care. The source of the error was obvious

First published in 1897. 3. The Episode of the Old Master. The source of the error was obvious. It lay in a cheque to Self or Bearer, for 5000 pounds, signed by SirCharles, and evidently paid across the counter in London, as it boreon its face no stamp or indication of any other office. I called in my brother-in-law from the salon to the study. Lookhere, Charles," I said, "there's a cheque in the book which youhaven't entered.

I The episode of the mexican seer. My name is Seymour Wilbraham Wentworth. We had run across to the Riviera for a few weeks in the season. I am brother-in-law and secretary to Sir Charles Vandrift, the South African millionaire and famous financier. Many years ago, when Charlie Vandrift was a small lawyer in Cape Town, I had the (qualified) good fortune to marry his sister. Our object being strictly rest and recreation from the arduous duties of financial combination, we did not think it necessary to take our wives out with us.

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An African Millionaire book.

An African Millionaire book. The gentleman thief known as Colonel Clay cons the same South African Millionaire, Sir Charles Vandrift again and again in a series of clever short stories. It is immensely satisfying to read how the pompous Vandrift and his equally demanding wife are tricked out of their money through their own greed, vanity and suspicion.

Report an error in the book.

The Episode of the Arrest of the Colonel. 8. The Episode of the Seldon Gold Mine. 9. The Episode of the Japanned Dispatch Box. 10. The Episode of the Game of Poker. 11. The Episode of the Bertillon Method. 12. The Episode of the Old Bailey. I.

The Project Gutenberg EBook of An African Millionaire, by Grant Allen We had run across to the Riviera for a few weeks in the season

The Project Gutenberg EBook of An African Millionaire, by Grant Allen. This eBook is for the use of anyone anywhere at no cost and with almost no restrictions whatsoever. You may copy it, give it away or re-use it under the terms of the Project Gutenberg License included with this eBook or online at ww. utenberg.

An ironic, adventure tale He does not work for money Madame Picardet answered, but for the good of humanity. I'm sure he would gladly come and exhibit for nothing his miraculous faculties. Grant Allen, An African Millionaire: Episodes in the Life of the Illustrious Colonel Clay The story of an African millionaire that is burglarized many times. This eBook also contains a bonus book club leadership guide and discussion questions.

THE EPISODE OF THE MEXICAN SEER My name is Seymour Wilbraham Wentworth. Much later, when the Vandrift estate and farm near Kimberley developed by degrees into the Cloetedorp Golcondas, Limited, my brother-in-law offered me the not unremunerative post of secretary; in which capacity I have ever since been his constant and attached companion.

Grant Allen's An African Millionaire consists of 12 parts for ease of reading. Do you think An African Millionaire Episodes in the Life of the Illustrious Colonel Clay is great ? Let others know. Choose the part of An African Millionaire which you want to read from the table of contents to get started. Table of Contents for An African Millionaire by Grant Allen. This book contains 69292 words.

An African Millionaire; Episodes in the Life of the Illustrious Colonel Clay by Charles Grant Blairfindie Allen.About the AuthorGrant Allen (1848 - 1899)Charles Grant Blairfindie Allen (February 24, 1848 - October 25, 1899) was a science writer, author and novelist; an able upholder of the theory of evolution.Born near Kingston, Ontario, Canada, the son of an emigrant Anglo-Scottish Protestant minister and grandson of the fifth Baron of Longueuil, he studied in the United Kingdom and France and in his mid twenties became a professor at Queen's College in Jamaica.Despite his religious father, Allen became an agnostic and a socialist. After leaving his professorship, in 1876 he returned to the UK, where he turned his talents to writing, gaining a reputation for his essays on science and for literary works.His first books were on scientific subjects, and include Physiological Esthetics (1877) and Flowers and Their Pedigrees (1886). He was first influenced by associationist psychology as it was expounded by Alexander Bain and Herbert Spencer, the latter often considered the most important individual in the transition from associationist psychology to Darwinian functionalism. In Allen's many articles on flowers and perception in insects, Darwinian arguments replaced the old Spencerian terms. On a personal level, a long friendship that started when Allen met Spencer on his return from Jamaica, also grew uneasy over the years. Allen wrote a critical and revealing biographical article on Spencer that was published after Spencer was dead. (Quote from wikipedia.org)About the Publisher Forgotten Books is a publisher of historical writings, such as: Philosophy, Classics, Scien

Fohuginn
Pleasant way to pass the time, but nothing special.
Katius
A very pleasant read with a nice moral. I was duped at the beginning and gradually swayed by the end as the author intended.
Yananoc
In QUEEN'S QUORUM (1951), Ellery Queen mistakenly listed Grant Allen's AN AFRICAN MILLIONAIRE (1897) among the 106 most important books of crime short stories published since 1845, and many other critics have praised it as the first short story collection that focuses on the adventures of a rogue. In actuality, this book is a novel with 12 chapters that add up to an indictment of a group of men that the author, a progressive writer of the late 19th century, strongly disapproved of.

Although several of its chapters have been anthologized separately by modern editors as if they are short stories, many other chapters would be very unsatisfying if read as stand-alones--some because Colonel Clay (as the confidence man is usually called) plays little or no part in them; others because they have to do with the capture and trial of the confidence man. When read in their proper order, the 12 chapters form a connected whole and, especially towards the end, thrust upon the reader a "message" about the class of people that the African millionaire (the supposed victim) represents.

Like many novels written by Allen's contemporaries, who included Thomas Hardy, this book is "didactic" in the best sense. Specifically, it is an example of what Aristotle called "forensic rhetoric," detailing chapter by chapter the petty, sleazy, shady, and unscrupulous sides of a typical wealthy businessman of the late 19th century. Colonel Clay, the confidence man, is used by Allen as a minor rogue to show readers what the really big rogues are like. At the end, while the conman is being tried, convicted, and sentenced, the world-within-the-novel learns the full details of the totally "legal" crookedness of the millionaire, who ironically is free to continue plundering every which way he likes, fully protected by the law. Near the end the trial, the judge who summarizes the evidence says that in this case the law is set up to protect rogues from being preyed on by other rogues.

The story is narrated by the brother-in-law of the millionaire (a man of weak morals himself), and for the most part Allen's writing is quite witty and engaging. Although AN AFRICAN MILLIONAIRE was written more than a century ago, its message is a relevant one to anybody who has been following news these past few years.

One nice feature of the Dover reprint edition (which I own) is that it includes the original illustrations.

Very highly recommended!
Mamuro
In QUEEN'S QUORUM (1951), Ellery Queen mistakenly listed Grant Allen's AN AFRICAN MILLIONAIRE (1897) among the 106 most important books of crime short stories published since 1845, and many other critics have praised it as the first short story collection that focuses on the adventures of a rogue. In actuality, this book is a novel with 12 chapters that add up to an indictment of a group of men that the author, a progressive writer of the late 19th century, strongly disapproved of.

Although several of its chapters have been anthologized separately by modern editors as if they are short stories, many other chapters would be very unsatisfying if read as stand-alones--some because Colonel Clay (as the confidence man is usually called) plays little or no part in them; others because they have to do with the capture and trial of the confidence man. When read in their proper order, the 12 chapters form a connected whole and, especially towards the end, thrust upon the reader a "message" about the class of people that the African millionaire (the supposed victim) represents.

Like many novels written by Allen's contemporaries, who included Thomas Hardy, this book is "didactic" in the best sense. Specifically, it is an example of what Aristotle called "forensic rhetoric," detailing chapter by chapter the petty, sleazy, shady, and unscrupulous sides of a typical wealthy businessman of the late 19th century. Colonel Clay, the confidence man, is used by Allen as a minor rogue to show readers what the really big rogues are like. At the end, while the conman is being tried, convicted, and sentenced, the world-within-the-novel learns the full details of the totally "legal" crookedness of the millionaire, who ironically is free to continue plundering every which way he likes, fully protected by the law. Near the end the trial, the judge who summarizes the evidence says that in this case the law is set up to protect rogues from being preyed on by other rogues.

The story is narrated by the brother-in-law of the millionaire (a man of weak morals himself), and for the most part Allen's writing is quite witty and engaging. Although AN AFRICAN MILLIONAIRE was written more than a century ago, its message is a relevant one to anybody who has been following news these past few years.

Very highly recommended!