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by Paula McLain
Download A Ticket to Ride: A Novel fb2
Genre Fiction
  • Author:
    Paula McLain
  • ISBN:
    0061340529
  • ISBN13:
    978-0061340529
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Ecco; Reprint edition (November 24, 2015)
  • Pages:
    272 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Genre Fiction
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1930 kb
  • ePUB format
    1386 kb
  • DJVU format
    1608 kb
  • Rating:
    4.5
  • Votes:
    706
  • Formats:
    lit docx mobi azw


Ships from and sold by Fifty Third Street Books. a strong throb of a first novel. Cleveland Plain Dealer).

Ships from and sold by Fifty Third Street Books. poet and memoirist McLain compels as she excavates two tragedies.

A Ticket to Ride: A Novel (. Paula McLain is a good writer, this is somewhat different from the historical fiction biographies, but well worth the read. Published on March 29, 2016. alternates between Jamie's point of view and her Uncle Raymond's, and as we follow the story arcs of the two characters, the picture fills in and presents the full story. Each chapter is titled with songs from the era, and sometimes, I could almost hear the music lilting in the background.

For Connor, Fiona, and Beckett. Well let me tell you ’bout the way she looked. Other Books by Paula McLain. The way she acted, the color of her hair. Her voice was soft and cool. Her eyes were clear and bright. For years it was August.

A Ticket to Ride book. Set in the long, hot summer of 1973, Paula McLain's lyrical debut novel explores what happens when an insecure, motherless teenager falls under Remember that girl? The one who was impossibly cool, who taught you how to blow smoke rings, cut school, sneak out of the house? Remember how you turned yourself inside out trying to be just like her-and then she broke your heart?

A Ticket to Ride: A Novel. A Ticket to Ride - Paula McLain.

A Ticket to Ride: A Novel. In the long, hot Illinois summer of 1973, insecure, motherless Jamie falls under the dangerous spell of her older, more worldly cousin Fawn, who’s come to stay with Jamie and her uncle as penance for committing an unmentionable act. It is a time of awakenings and corruptions, of tragedy and loss, as Jamie slowly discovers the extent to which Fawn will use anything and anyone to further her own ends-and recognizes, perhaps too late, her own complicity in the disaster that takes shape around them.

Эту книгу можно прочитать в Google Play Книгах на компьютере, а также на устройствах Android и iO. Look for an excerpt from Paula McLain’s captivating new novel, Love and Ruin, about Hemingway’s third wife, Martha Gellhorn.

Эту книгу можно прочитать в Google Play Книгах на компьютере, а также на устройствах Android и iOS. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "A Ticket to Ride: A Novel" для чтения в офлайн-режиме.

The book perfectly captures the free-spirited attitude of the decade and the . Библиографические данные. A Ticket to Ride: A Novel.

The book perfectly captures the free-spirited attitude of the decade and the curiosity of adolescence. Tampa Tribune McLain compels as she excavates two tragedies. Paula McLain received an MFA in poetry from the University of Michigan, and has been a resident of Yaddo and the MacDowell Colony. She is the author of two collections of poetry, two novels, and a memoir, and lives in Cleveland with her family.

That is certainly true - but Ticket to Ride is no teen-age novel.

For years it was August. There was heat like wet gauze and a high, white sky and music coming from everywhere at once  . That is certainly true - but Ticket to Ride is no teen-age novel. Poetic writing and fast action highlight a timeless tale of the choices we make for the wrong reasons - love, a need to belong, and misplaced loyalty. This is a carefully constructed story of two intertwined relationships that builds suspense gradually to a dynamite ending that keeps you on edge till the last sentence. haunting & beautifully written. Published by Thriftbooks. com User, 11 years ago.

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In the long, hot Illinois summer of 1973, insecure, motherless Jamie falls under the dangerous spell of her older, more worldly cousin Fawn, who’s come to stay with Jamie and her uncle as penance for committing an “unmentionable act.”

It is a time of awakenings and corruptions, of tragedy and loss, as Jamie slowly discovers the extent to which Fawn will use anything and anyone to further her own ends—and recognizes, perhaps too late, her own complicity in the disaster that takes shape around them.

“A captivating story about a teenager’s struggle to be accepted by her peers. . . .  The story is more than believable—it simply comes alive. The book perfectly captures the free-spirited attitude of the decade and the curiosity of adolescence.”—Tampa Tribune

“McLain compels as she excavates two tragedies.” —Chicago Sun-Times


Wetiwavas
McLain is one of my favorite authors. She has a personal history (growing up in foster homes) as interesting and complex as the characters in her novels or the verses in her poems. This novel takes place during a long, hot Illinois summer in 1973. It is a coming of age story about an insecure, motherless 15-year-old girl who falls under the dangerous spell of her older and more worldly female cousin. Since I graduated high school in 1973 I have the advantage of going down memory lane. I recognized all the music, expressions and fashion statements of the times. Yet actually, any teen girl who ever spent a summer working on her tan, while listening to the radio, dreaming about boys and wondering how to become popular will be able to relate. But this is more than a cliché episode that you can watch on “That 70’s Show”. The girls are written heartbreakingly real displaying all the urgency that is a normal part of adolescence. The type of teenage angst that adults realize can easily turn into self-destruction. The novel is written beautifully; poetic-like with 1970’s song titles as the chapter titles. I recommend buying a ticket for this ride.
Yramede
In the long hot summer of 1973, two young teenage girls push the boundaries, hoping to experience whatever it will take to make them cool, sexy, and happy.

For Jamie, the exploration is about a motherless girl searching for approval and acceptance, which is why she is so willing to follow the lead of her cousin Fawn, who has ended up in Moline, Illinois because she is trouble personified. Fawn's version of the events that brought her to Illinois casts her in the most positive light possible. And to Jamie, who has been shunted back and forth between relatives after her mother Suzette took off one day years before, Fawn's behavior may send up red flags, but she is ill-equipped to interpret the signs.

A Ticket to Ride: A Novel (P.S.) alternates between Jamie's point of view and her Uncle Raymond's, and as we follow the story arcs of the two characters, the picture fills in and presents the full story. Each chapter is titled with songs from the era, and sometimes, I could almost hear the music lilting in the background.

As the summer draws to a close, these two young girls seeking excitement have stumbled upon a whole world of trouble and tragedy.

As Jamie is trying to sort out and understand what has happened, she and her uncle finally sit down to talk, and in a few moments of soul-searching honesty, Jamie learns the whole saga about her mother and what happened so long ago. Examining the realities of the past and revisiting the moments of one hot summer full of errors in judgment, Jamie will finally begin to discover her place and her identity.

The characters are multilayered, with all the facets of real people trying to make sense of their lives, the choices they've made, and the possibilities that are left for them. Four stars for an insightful story that, while it may not be for everyone, is a relevant coming-of-age tale set during a unique time in history.
Risky Strong Dromedary
After reading The Paris Wife and mentally sorting it into my five-favorite-books list, I eagerly awaited McClain's next novel. She did not disappoint. A Ticket to Ride is vastly different than The Paris Wife, which I think is a testament to McClain's talent as a writer. This novel absorbed me completely and, unlike a few of the other reviewers, I liked how the story flipped back and forth on the character/time continuum. At times I found the story of Jamie and Fawn to be so full of tension that it was a relief to be interrupted by the Uncle/Suzette thread. Those were the chapters when I was actually able to put the book down and get some shut-eye. Not that they weren't compelling as well, but I was a bit less invested in those characters.

I loved this book and have recommended it to many. Looking forward to the author's next effort.
Rageseeker
The blurb on this one sold me. Jamie was a seriously naive young girl who was never wanted by her mother and grew up living with her grandparents -- until that's not an option anymore. Whisked away from California to Moline, Illinois to live with her Uncle. Everything is okay. Lackluster, but, okay.

Enter Fawn...The wild child. Jamie adores Fawn. Idolizes her. Wants to be more like her. Fawn steps into Jamie's life and things begin to go downhill from there. Jamie is an impressionable girl who wants to do whatever she can to please Fawn, including sneaking out and doing crazy things. By the time Jamie begins to figure out what Fawn is all about, it's too late.

Interesting book. I liked it a lot -- and look forward to reading more of the author's work.
hardy
How refreshing to read great, solid writing. The story is good, not great, and the characters are full, even when predictable. But the real pleasure is in consuming the talent of Paula McClain. She is clearly one of the best, ranking right up there with one of my favorites, Wally Lamb. I'll be looking for more offerings by Ms. McClain.
Akisame
This was okay, but it was not as good as her books about Hemingway's wives. I wasn't as drawn to her characters in this one.
Mogelv
This book predates the other books by this author that I have read, and I really liked the others better, because of the genre if nothing else. I thought this was well-written, but it was sort of dark and depressing.
Not a bad book but somewhat disappointing. Fawn, the character who certainly was the catalyst for everything that followed, seemed to be nothing more than your run of the mill rebellious teen. We never really know what caused her behavior. Judging from the book's description, I expected Fawn to be a much more interesting and exciting character. Perhaps, a somewhat chilling villain. I'd have to say that the author should have explored this teenager and given her much more depth.Not a page turner and not what I expected.