Download Supreme Courtship fb2

by Christopher Buckley
Download Supreme Courtship fb2
Genre Fiction
  • Author:
    Christopher Buckley
  • ISBN:
    0446579823
  • ISBN13:
    978-0446579827
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Twelve; First Edition edition (September 3, 2008)
  • Pages:
    285 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Genre Fiction
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1908 kb
  • ePUB format
    1921 kb
  • DJVU format
    1458 kb
  • Rating:
    4.6
  • Votes:
    952
  • Formats:
    mbr azw lrf txt


Supreme Courtship is Christopher Buckley at his witty, laugh-out-loud best. The hilarious tale involves a president, frustrated that his two previous Supreme Court nominees were rejected by a petty senator for venal reasons, nominates the popular TV judge star of a Judge Judy-type show.

Supreme Courtship is Christopher Buckley at his witty, laugh-out-loud best. The characters' personalities are vivid, and readers will have fum deciphering which real DC or pop culture characters are being spoofed. Buckley has a spare, short-chapter, heavy dialogue pacing style that keeps Supreme Courtship is Christopher Buckley at his witty, laugh-out-loud best.

FREE shipping on qualifying offers

FREE shipping on qualifying offers. President of the United States Donald Vanderdamp is having a hell of a time getting his nominees appointed to the Supreme Court. After one nominee is rejected for insufficiently appreciating To Kill A Mockingbird.

Thank God, his fellow justices agreed-unanimously, for once-cam. So far, he had vetoed 185 spending bills, acquiring the nickname Don Veto.

MC Book Club: Supreme Courtship by Christopher Buckley. With a new justice joining the top court, the MC Book Club goes behind the scenes of our judicial branch with Christopher Buckley's satire Supreme Courtship. Worth your discretionary dollar? Read on. Aug 5, 2009. THE PLOT: What if President Obama nominated Judge Judy for the highest court in the land? That's the premise behind Supreme Courtship, the latest sexy spoof from Beltway insider Christopher Buckley

Supreme Courtship is a 2008 novel by Christopher Buckley, which tells the story of a Judge Judy-style TV judge nominated to the Supreme Court of the United States.

Supreme Courtship is a 2008 novel by Christopher Buckley, which tells the story of a Judge Judy-style TV judge nominated to the Supreme Court of the United States. After several failed attempts to seek Senate approval for his Supreme Court nominations, perpetually unpopular President Donald P. Vanderdamp (nicknamed "Don Veto" by Congress) decides to get even by nominating Judge Pepper Cartwright, star of Courtroom Six and America's most popular TV judge, to the Supreme Court.

In Christopher Buckley’s new novel, the fun begins when a popular TV judge is appointed to the Supreme Court. And this subtext clarifies Buckley’s moral critique of Washington. Call it the banality of misrule.

Thank God, his fellow justices agreed-unanimously, for once-cameras weren’t allowed in the Court.

Author: Christopher Buckley. In bestselling author Christopher Buckley’s hilarious novel, the President of the United States, ticked off at the Senate for rejecting his nominees, decides to get even by nominating America ‘s most popular TV judge to the Supreme Court. President Donald Vanderdamp is having a hell of a time getting his nominees onto the Supreme Court.

Supreme Courtship is another classic Christopher Buckley comedy about the Washington institutions most deserving of ridicule.

In bestselling author Christopher Buckley's hilarious novel, the President of the United States, ticked off at the Senate for rejecting his nominees, decides to get even by nominating America's most popular TV judge to the Supreme Court. Supreme Courtship is another classic Christopher Buckley comedy about the Washington institutions most deserving of ridicule.

Supreme Courtship is another classic Christopher Buckley comedy about the Washington institutions most deserving . Christopher Buckley was born December 24, 1952. He is an American political satirist and the author of novels including God Is My Broker, Thank You for Smoking, Little Green Men, The White House Mess, No Way to Treat a First Lady, Wet Work, Florence of Arabia, Boomsday, Supreme Courtship, and, most recently, Losing Mum and Pup: A Memoir. He is the son of William F. Buckley Jr. and Patricia Buckley. Buckley, like his father, graduated from Yale University, as a member of Skull and Bones.

President of the United States Donald Vanderdamp is having a hell of a time getting his nominees appointed to the Supreme Court. After one nominee is rejected for insufficiently appreciating To Kill A Mockingbird, the president chooses someone so beloved by voters that the Senate won't have the guts to reject her -- Judge Pepper Cartwright, the star of the nation's most popular reality show, Courtroom Six. Will Pepper, a straight-talking Texan, survive a confirmation battle in the Senate? Will becoming one of the most powerful women in the world ruin her love life? And even if she can make it to the Supreme Court, how will she get along with her eight highly skeptical colleagues, including a floundering Chief Justice who, after legalizing gay marriage, learns that his wife has left him for another woman. Soon, Pepper finds herself in the middle of a constitutional crisis, a presidential reelection campaign that the president is determined to lose, and oral arguments of a romantic nature. Supreme Courtship is another classic Christopher Buckley comedy about the Washington institutions most deserving of ridicule.

Anardred
The President of the United States, Donald P. Vanderdamp, has an approval rating barely above twenty. Congress, and politicians of both parties, despise him, because he has vetoed every spending bill that reached his desk. In retaliation, the Senate has rejected the two eminently qualified jurists he nominated for an open seat on the Supreme Court. All he wants to do is move back home to Wapakoneta, Ohio, where he can go bowling as often as he wishes. His term is almost up. About all that remains is to find someone who can gain the approval of the Senate for that Supreme Court slot.

Enter Judge Perdita "Pepper" Cartwright, star of the top-rated reality TV show, Courtroom Six. While searching for a bowling show on television over a weekend at Camp David, President Vanderdamp chances upon Pepper's show and is immediately enchanted. Now in her mid-thirties, Pepper is uncommonly facile with the English language—and uncommonly attractive. The President is convinced the Senate won't dare reject her nomination, given her sky-high Q rating.

This is the set-up in Supreme Courtship, Christopher Buckley's satirical treatment of the U.S. Supreme Court. No reader will be surprised to learn that Pepper is, in fact, named to the Court. Then, of course, the real fun begins. The novel is amusing and even hilarious at times. On the whole, though, it's not one of Buckley's best.
Styphe
Went on to read his Relic Master, and Judge Hunter set in historical past and enjoyed them more. I wanted the Supreme Courtship main character to stay closer to her roots and have the chaos as occurs in Buckley books to come out of that. It was still enjoyable, but I would really like to see some more of the historical please
Hulore
I ordered this book after seeing an interview with Christopher Buckley on the CBS Sunday Morning show. I have enjoyed several of his past efforts and this one sounded like a natural after hearing his explanation of his latest effort at satire.

Getting nominations to the US Supreme Court approved in the US when a Republican is President and the Democrats are in charge of the Senate has become politcal theater at it's worst since the nomination of Judge Robert Bork. Getting "borked" has become a verb in the English language and it is with that as background that Buckley sets out to take Washington to task once again.

The president in this novel has become so angered by the perfunctory manner in which two sterling nominees were turned down by the Senate Judiciary Committee chaired by a Senator who himself wants to be appointed, that he names The Hon. Pepper Cartwright to the Supreme Court vacancy. Cartwright is the TV judge of a hit television show and wildly popular with the American public.

That, to me, sounded like a story line that couldn't miss as great satire but alas and alak, I found this book often hitting wide of the target. Not that there aren't some hilarious parts to the book, but they were widely spaced and often disconnected from the central story.

I really wanted to like this book. Buckley confided to Leslie Stahl in his interview that his late father, William F. Buckley, Jr. was not a fan of his satire. Until this book, I would have disagreed with that sentiment. I hope his next effort finds him returning to form.
Barit
And it is. If Buckley-the-younger's other stuff was good, this is great. Remember when Earl K. Long, thinking about the Louisiana law what said a governor could only succeed himself once? Earl came up with an almost Einstein-like thought experiment: has asked--rhetorically, of course--"what would happen if, maybe 6 months before an election, I stepped down from being governor?"

A. J. Liebling, in his wonderful book, The Earl of Louisiana, says, "Even Huey [Earl's older and far more famous brother] didn't think of that." Blaze Starr was never as good-looking as Lolita Davidovich, who played opposite Paul Newman in Blaze, but most of the history was accurate. I remember--I grew up in New Orleans and was in a very political family, so I saw it all happening in what passed for real time back in the day.

President Vandercamp, bowling enthusiasm notwithstanding, inspires the opposite in his Congressional adversaries: they propose and, in Congress, pass a term limit amendment. Then it gets interesting....
Andromajurus
Christopher Buckley's Supreme Courtship is a wonderful parody of the extent to which entertainment and politics have merged. It also pokes excellent fun of the nomination process.

In the book, an Eisenhower type President gets frustrated by the Senate Judiciary Committee for rejecting all of his highly qualified justices. One justice is rejected because of a movie review he wrote in the sixth grade in which he said that To Kill a Mockingbird was a "little boring." This causes the head of the Judiciary Committee to declare he could not in good conscious appoint a justice 'who may show up to his first day on the bench dressed not in a justices robe but in a Ku Klux Klan outfit."

This turns out to be the last straw for the President, who responds by nominating a TV judge - sort of a younger, hotter Judge Judy. The public loves the idea and no Senator could risk voting against her. Hilarity ensues.

A fun read and excellent parody.
Mohn
Great potential but the plot line falls off. The premise of Judge Judy being a SCOTUS judge is hilarious but the plot quickly veers off with all of the other characters' plot lines. Author should have stuck to Judge Pepper's time on the bench.