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by Malcolm Macdonald
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Genre Fiction
  • Author:
    Malcolm Macdonald
  • ISBN:
    1402236085
  • ISBN13:
    978-1402236082
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Sourcebooks Landmark; Reissue edition (March 1, 2010)
  • Pages:
    592 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Genre Fiction
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1930 kb
  • ePUB format
    1572 kb
  • DJVU format
    1468 kb
  • Rating:
    4.5
  • Votes:
    964
  • Formats:
    mobi txt doc mbr


Home . Malcolm MacDonald . The World from Rough Stones. The unforgettable first novel in the classic Stevenson Family Saga from epic master Malcolm Macdonald.

Home . John Stevenson is a just a foreman when a near-fatal accident bring young Nora Telling into his life. Her nimbleness of mind and his power of command enable them to take over the working mill and rescue it from catastrophe. Together with their friends the Thorntons-who are troubled by a marriage mismatched in passion-they are willing to risk any dare, commit themselves to any act of cunning on their climb from rags to riches.

"Lord John"" Stevenson is the clever, ruthless and hugely popular foreman working on a project to build the world's longest railway tunnel. World From Rough Stones Stevenson Saga (Том 1). Together with an ill-married couple, Walter and Arabella Thornton, they risk everything in their quest to achieve the wealth and power they so desperately desire.

No part of this book may be reproduced in any form or by any electronic or mechanical means including information . Macdonald, Malcolm The world from rough stones, Malcolm Macdonald.

Macdonald, Malcolm The world from rough stones, Malcolm Macdonald. 2. Social change-Great Britain-History- 19th century-Fiction.

The unforgettable first novel in the classic Stevenson Family Saga from epic master Malcolm Macdonald John Stevenson is a just a foreman when a near-fatal accident bring young Nora Telling into his life

The unforgettable first novel in the classic Stevenson Family Saga from epic master Malcolm Macdonald John Stevenson is a just a foreman when a near-fatal accident bring young Nora Telling into his life.

World From Rough Stones (Stevenson Family Saga Welcome to Gray City. The free online library containing 500000+ books. Read books for free from anywhere and from any device.

World From Rough Stones (Stevenson Family Saga Malcolm Macdonald. Year Published: 1977. Welcome to Gray City. Listen to books in audio format instead of reading.

Written by. Manufacturer: Sourcebooks Landmark Release date: 1 March 2010 ISBN-10 : 1402236085 ISBN-13: 9781402236082.

Roots: The Saga of an American Family is a 1976 novel written by Alex Haley. It tells the story of Kunta Kinte, an 18th-century African, captured as an adolescent, sold into slavery in Africa, transported to North America; following his life and the. It tells the story of Kunta Kinte, an 18th-century African, captured as an adolescent, sold into slavery in Africa, transported to North America; following his life and the lives of his descendants in the United States down to Haley.

World From Rough Stones (Stevenson Family Saga Read books for free from anywhere and from any device.

by Malcolm Macdonald Books related to The World from Rough Stones.

by Malcolm Macdonald. The first novel in the classic Stevenson Family Saga, The World from Rough Stones is the epic story of two ambitious but poor young people who, at the very start of the Victorian Era, combine their considerable talents to found a dynasty and go on to fame and fortune. the most exciting since the Swanns of Delderfield and the Forsytes of Galsworthy!" -Cincinatti Times. Books related to The World from Rough Stones.

The unforgettable first novel in the classic Stevenson Family Saga from epic master Malcolm Macdonald

John Stevenson is a just a foreman when a near-fatal accident bring young Nora Telling into his life. Her nimbleness of mind and his power of command enable them to take over the working mill and rescue it from catastrophe. Together with their friends the Thorntons-who are troubled by a marriage mismatched in passion-they are willing to risk any dare, commit themselves to any act of cunning on their climb from rags to riches.

The first novel in the classic Stevenson Family Saga, The World from Rough Stones is the epic story of two ambitious but poor young people who, at the very start of the Victorian Era, combine their considerable talents to found a dynasty and go on to fame and fortune.

"A monumental saga...rich and tremendous." -Boston Globe

"A saga of immense power...the most exciting since the Swanns of Delderfield and the Forsytes of Galsworthy!" -Cincinatti Times

"Zestful research and Macdonald's mastery of the dialects and speech of all classes bring his novel noisily to life from the first to the last page." -The [London] Times

"A powerful new novel...a successful attempt to blend fiction with authenticity. The story is rich with colourful characters, brawling, boozing, and bedding...leaves the reader waiting impatiently for the next novel in what must be a memorable series." -Yorkshire Evening Post


Yozshujinn
This historical fiction book about the rise of the steam trains in England in the second half of the 19th century is heavily fact-based and has an extensive bibliography included at the end, but in NO way seems like a textbook you'd detest having to read in school. From the intensity of the first few pages (spoiler alert: you'd better set aside a chunk of free time before you start - you're not going to want to stop reading any time soon!), you'll be be hard pressed to want to put down the book long enough even to eat. The characters are people you want to know, and there is intrigue a-plenty, (eventual) romance, and a fascinating look at the politics and intricacies of business as the British became more industrialized. I loved this book and its several sequels. Am waiting and hoping for Hollywood to make it into a movie!
Yojin
Not to mention tedious, boring, and at times anti-climatic. So why did I read it then? At times it would come roaring in like a lion with strong scenes and such redeeming qualities that I forced myself to continue. Here is basically the book...

-Old English dialect that you can't understand.
-pages upon pages about how to build a railroad tunnel
-pages upon pages describing railroad workers
-more dialect. What are they saying?
-holy cow! She did what? What's he gonna do?
-pages upon pages about how many bricks it takes to build the railroad
-pages upon pages about how to get a loan to build the railroad project.

Good qualities:
-strong female character who is a survivor and takes no crap even though women were viewed as no more than brood mares during this time period
-great male role model that shows compassion to the undeserving, patience, level-headedness, ambition, and is slow to anger (basically all a good man should be)
-a rise to fight social injustices committed on the poor.

Glad I read it but I had to skim through the boring patches.
FireWater
Several years ago I read and enjoyed The Stevenson Family Saga by Malcolm Macdonald about the heady days of the early Victorian era when huge fortunes were made (and lost) during the first Industrial Revolution. "World from Rough Stones" is the first book in a series about the family of John and Nora Stephenson and their growing and increasingly profitable construction contracting business.

"World from Rough Stones" is the first book in a series about John Stevenson, a mountain of a man we meet first working as a Navvy digging a railway tunnel and his wife Nora, who came to him totally destitute but with a very sharp mind. Just after meeting Nora, with a bit of luck and some skulduggery, John takes over the contract to finish the longest railway tunnel in the world at that time. The contract has an almost impossible timetable and John has limited financial resources. John is a natural manager and gets the best out of the tough and wild men digging the tunnel. He soon finds that Nora has the most amazing financial and commercial skills which support him through the most difficult times.

The title of the next book in the series is "Rich are With You Always" which gives you some idea of the success of the Stevenson ventures. This series is similar to R Delderfield's better known Swann Family Saga (God is an Englishman and sequels) covering a similar era but the Swann's made their fortune by providing transport outside the railway and canal networks.

These were heady and exciting when in a mere 50 years England transformed itself from an aristocratic and basically feudal society into the world's first industrial society. With the advent of the steam engine and locomotives, railways, factories and housing estates popped up like mushrooms, changing the face of the English countryside and society forever. The factional Stevenson family were an essential part of that revolution.

This book has been out of print for years and it was great to re-visit it now it is available on Kindle. I have a great interest the monumental social and economic changes in England in the first half of the 19th Century and this book was just as exciting to me as when I read it first. Some parts may now seem a bit ponderous but the insight into the period and some of the people involved in creating our modern world are just as gripping to me many years later.
Vizuru
Interesting read. The two biggest issues I had with the book are the use of the dialect, I understand what the author was trying to do, but it made the reading very difficult in parts of the book. I had to actually read aloud in some sections to be able to understand the the characters were saying, & I'm not sure if they would have really been as readily accepted accross class lines as they were. Not like he entirely ignored that divide, but I do feel like he minimized it. But he did touch upon lots of other issues of the industrial revolution that are usually either entirely ignored, or detialed to the point of being so depressing as to make you wonder why people actually reproduced during that time period & anyone below the class of nobility didn't just slit their wrists & get it overwith. He managed to touch on poverty, venerial disease, restictive/urealistic expectations of sex/women in marriage, poor wages, poor medical care, children's issues, class issues, etc. without bringing the novel to a grinding depressing halt. The attitude that comes across is more "this is the hand I'm dealt, so lets get on with it & make the most of it" It kept the novel out of grim, while showing the less savory side of lower class & rising middle class victorian England during the early industrial revolution. Not an easy task, but made for an interesting read overall, but not exactly light beach fluff
tamada
Enjoyed this book immensely some time ago and have benefited greatly by reading it again now. Includes something for everyone - great historical relevance, characters that you feel that you know personally, romance and sincere interpersonal relationships, interesting information about the development of railways and steam engines in the 1830's ... And now I am looking forward to re-visiting the sequels and some other works of Malcolm Macdonald.