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by Donald James Lawn
Download The Memoirs of John F. Kennedy: A Novel fb2
Genre Fiction
  • Author:
    Donald James Lawn
  • ISBN:
    0982906404
  • ISBN13:
    978-0982906408
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Castlefin Press; First Edition edition (November 22, 2010)
  • Pages:
    396 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Genre Fiction
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1581 kb
  • ePUB format
    1620 kb
  • DJVU format
    1822 kb
  • Rating:
    4.4
  • Votes:
    927
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Yet, in the case of this novel by Donald James Lawn, I was intrigued. Its premise is based on President Kennedy having survived the assassination attempt against him in Dallas, TX, on November 22, 1963.

Yet, in the case of this novel by Donald James Lawn, I was intrigued. JFK makes a slow, painful recovery, runs for re-election and decisively wins a second term in 1964

This novel interweaves two story lines. Books related to The Memoirs of John F. Kennedy: A Novel.

This novel interweaves two story lines. One takes place in 1963 at Parkland Medical Center and follows Attorney General Robert F. Kennedy, Jackie Kennedy, Lyndon Johnson and J. Edgar Hoover as they cope with the explosive events of the assassination attempt while the wounded president hovers near death. The other more lighthearted story line unfolds through the eyes of Patrick Hennessey, the memoirist appointed by JFK during the approaching end of his second term in 1968.

The Memoirs of John F. Kennedy: A Novel brings to life the tantalizing possibilities of -what might have been- had JFK remained president after November 22, 1963. This book imagines an America where progressive leadership takes hold during the 1960s, where President Kennedy, after a grueling fight for his life in a Dallas hospital, survives his chest wounds and returns to the presidency. He is elected for a second term. He does not mount a ground war in Vietnam. Kennedy: A Novel" brings to life the tantalizing possibilities of what might have been had JFK remained president after November 22, 1963. This book imagines an America where progressive leadership takes hold during the 1960s, and he is elected for a second term during which he does not mount a ground war in Vietnam. The Memoirs of John F. Kennedy: A Novel brings to life the tantalizing possibilities of "what might have been" had JFK remained president after November 22, 1963.

Kennedy: A Novel Details Memoir: My 5-year affair with John F. including an ex-girlfriend who has written a new memoir. About This Book: Title: The Memoirs of John . .

Download The Memoirs of John F. Kennedy: A Novel Details Memoir: My 5-year affair with John F. Memoirs of John F. Haag’s own. of his recently called me and he'd read the book.part of this memoir that is fully Ms. Mimi Alford, Once Upon a Secret: My Affair With President John F. Kennedy. com: The Memoirs of John F. Haag recounts her transformative affair with John F. Browse the. Though she spends much of the book framing herself as John.

Check out pictures, bibliography, and biography of Donald James Lawn.

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Read, The Memoirs of John F. Kennedy: A Novel by Donald Lawn.

In this case, more than 300 books have been written, and note that all of them ascribe different guilty parties. And, there will always be people who are drawn to evidence-denial. Read, The Memoirs of John F.

Category: John F. The JFK Head Shot Paradox. November 14, 2010 James FetzerDavid Mantik, Douglas Horne, James Douglass, James Fetzer, John F. Kennedy, magic bullet, The Kennedy Assassination, Zapruder. This Flash animation complements the last chapter of John D. Williams and Robert G. Waite, John F. Kennedy: History, Memory, Legacy (2009).

The John F. Kennedy assassination and the subsequent conspiracy theories surrounding it have been discussed, referenced, or recreated in popular culture numerous times

The John F. Kennedy assassination and the subsequent conspiracy theories surrounding it have been discussed, referenced, or recreated in popular culture numerous times. The fictional novel Gideon's March by J. J. Marric, was published in 1962 by Hodder and Stoughton in London, the year before the Kennedy assassination. Inspector George Gideon learns of a plot to assassinate President Kennedy during a state visit to London

The Memoirs of John F. Kennedy: A Novel brings to life the tantalizing possibilities of "what might have been" had JFK remained president after November 22, 1963. This book imagines an America where progressive leadership takes hold during the 1960s, where President Kennedy, after a grueling fight for his life in a Dallas hospital, survives his chest wounds and returns to the presidency. He is elected for a second term. He does not mount a ground war in Vietnam. Foreign relations with Cuba, the Soviet Union, South America, and our allies and adversaries around the world follow a very different path.  This novel interweaves a two-track story. One takes place in 1963 at Parkland Medical Center and follows Attorney General Robert F. Kennedy, Jackie Kennedy, Lyndon Johnson and J. Edgar Hoover as they cope with the explosive events of the assassination attempt while the wounded president hovers near death. The other more lighthearted fictional story-line unfolds through the eyes of Patrick Hennessey, the memoirist appointed by JFK during the approaching end of his second term in 1968. Through in-depth talks at the White House, Camp David, Hyannisport, on Air Force One, and golfing on Kennedy's private course at Glen Ora, Patrick gets to know the president as he reviews his decisions regarding the difficult path toward a peaceful resolution of world crises.  This well researched alternate history will strike a chord with readers worldwide-those fascinated with the Kennedy mystique and those interested in the potential for politics to be "done right" during challenging times. Considering the current period—and the 50th anniversary of JFK's election—re-imagining a more positive past may enable us to collectively envision a more enlightened future.

Brightcaster
I stumbled upon Donald James Lawn’s “The Memoirs of John F. Kennedy” having googled "historical fiction." And I'm glad I did because, being a fan of this genre, I consider this to be historical fiction at its very best. Far from being just a "period piece," this book is a fascinating melding of fact and fiction.

The story is historically factual up until November 22, 1963, but in a sharp turn of history, the author speculates about an assassination ATTEMPT, which the President miraculously survives. In fact, he goes on to win a second term, thereby remaining in office for almost the entirety of the decade of the 1960’s.

The book takes us through the politics of the day, including a hair-raising description of how the world teeters on the edge of annihilation during the Cuban Missile Crisis. (Later we read about how JFK teeters on the edge of death after the attempt on his life).

We also become privy to the (imagined?) subterfuge by J. Edgar Hoover in plotting with LBJ to keep the true nature of the supposed conspiracy under wraps for the "greater good" of the country.

Most notably, the Viet Nam War winds down quickly and never escalates as we know it unfortunately did.

Certain vignettes are very fanciful. One of my favorite parts of the book takes place in the later years of the President’s second term where he invites The Beatles to the White House. He and John Lennon play a game of golf together. Lennon is not very good at it. :-D

What if, indeed!

The vehicle that the author uses to tell this story is one Patrick Hennessey, a young pup of a journalist to whom the President takes a liking and enlists to ghost-write his memoirs. (Of course, no such memoirs exist in real life; that’s what makes the prospect so tantalizing.) JFK being such a brilliant personage and speaker, the author does a commendable job imagining how these memoirs would play out. The reader feels as though he is reading the real thing, as the book - including most especially the portions where the President is ruminating about his life and politics - is extremely well-written.

There is a sub-plot involving an attractive librarian in the Library of Congress who catches Patrick's eye while he is doing his research there. The "witty repartee" that passes between these two characters while they flirt and do the courtship dance is worth the price of admission alone. My only complaint was that this relationship could have been ratcheted up a notch, but then again, perhaps that would have been too formulaic.

The President himself also gets a chance to throw a few zingers as we see the dazzling Kennedy wit aimed at Patrick, JFK’s brother Bobby, and his golfmates. The dialogue is extremely realistic, given what we know of the Kennedy sense of humor. Very clever writing.

[Speaking of Bobby: While the book takes us to the conclusion of 1968, no mention is made of the assassination of either RFK or indeed Martin Luther King. I found myself wishing that the author had addressed these gaps in history.]

Fifty years later, we are still fascinated with Camelot and the numerous conspiracy theories that have arisen to explain the whys and hows of that fateful day in Dallas.

This book takes a different turn.

In the epilogue to his book, the author quotes a source opining that President Kennedy's death was "about the most important single thing that happened in the 1960's." Considering the tumult that was the 1960's, that's saying a lot. Although that opinion is debatable, "The Memoirs of John F. Kennedy" poses one of the ultimate "what-ifs."

All in all, an excellent read. Entertaining, well-written and enlightening as well. Bravo!
Washington
This novel at first reading appears to be a skillfully written alternate history that projects the consequences of a botched attempt on November 22 1963. It is in novel form with two timelines: the first fleshing out the weeks before and after November 22 1963 focused on Jack and Bobby, the second following a young reporter Patrick Hennessey with the Washington Post during the last year of JFK's second term, who is tapped to coauthor the president's memoirs. The precious interaction between JFK and his young memoirist --- as the now elder statesman JFK explains the true events taking place behind the curtain --- is at times heartbreaking as the writer postulates a much better possible recent history than we have suffered. The side story of Hennessey's arduous wooing of the difficult but attractive librarian at the Library of Congress is written with repartee that sparkles. The two timelines of the novel strongly inform one another but in this case do not quite converge satisfactorily. On second reading this novel may instead be a vehicle to promote the dominant conspiracy about the actual events in Dallas; had I known of this element to the novel I would have passed it by, but now, after this masterfully written novel, I too doubt the Warren Commission findings. I am a casualty of art.
Delari
This very original book kept me reading it in one go almost (I was reading other things as well...). The mix between fiction and fact has been smartly achieved by mr. Lawn and I think the awards he picked up for the book are justified by its contents. Especially toward the end when he lets the President speak about what the world has achieved (and not just him) is impressive. Toward the end of the book you want the writer of the memoires of the President, Patrick Hennessy, to continue his dialogue with the President until the Memoirs are finished in draft form...that shows to me this is a great book!
Also it underlines how sad it is that the so-called intelligence agency has been pivotal in covering up their greatest miscalculation! A though that occurred after reading this book (and before it several others) is that it is quite explainable why this Agency derailed so much of democratic principles and displayed disdain to it during that period of our history: the genesis of the Agency lies in a wartime situation (WWII) and the belief probably took hold with the founders (and the Agency was formalised by Truman) that it always needs to operate under the assumption of the pursuit of war instead of the pursuit of peace (raison d'être). If one then is confronted with a President who believes peace is the path to progress...well one can do the math.
Either way, the book makes you want that the President would not have been killed but lived to complete his work...HIGHLY RECOMMENDED!!!
Olma
Those who read this book know the exact location of where they were the fateful day JFK was shot. They felt the emotion and the pain; it was a national tragedy and is a national wound that has yet gone unhealed because of fabrications and the absence of transparency. We all felt it and know it deep inside as we currently live our daily lives. Now comes a story line, so real, so plausible, and so well researched that credibly helps us define what we lost that day besides our innocence. This is a story so well presented you will feel it again and ask questions again... Why were we not told the truth? "What If" the events of that day unfolded differently?

Donald James Lawn presents a story line so conceivable, so articulate, that you are there, right there..., but what is accomplished so masterfully and gently is the weaving of facts into a fictional story line. Once I started this book, I truly could not put it down! You will love the character of Patrick Hennessey, plus feel the personalities of Hoover, Johnson, and the Kennedy's (both John and Bobby). Golfers too will enjoy the humor. This is, most assuredly, a must read.