Download The Body Snatchers fb2

by Jack Finney
Download The Body Snatchers fb2
Genre Fiction
  • Author:
    Jack Finney
  • ISBN:
    1582881804
  • ISBN13:
    978-1582881805
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    The Stephen King Horror Library; First Thus edition (2005)
  • Pages:
    216 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Genre Fiction
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1177 kb
  • ePUB format
    1939 kb
  • DJVU format
    1244 kb
  • Rating:
    4.5
  • Votes:
    524
  • Formats:
    rtf mobi lit azw


Jack Finney (1911–1995) was the author of the much-loved and critically acclaimed novel Time and Again, as well as its .

Jack Finney (1911–1995) was the author of the much-loved and critically acclaimed novel Time and Again, as well as its sequel, From Time to Time. Best known for his thrillers and science fiction, a number of his books-including Invasion of the Body Snatchers-have been made into movies. Dean R. Koontz, the author of many New York Times bestsellers, lives with his wife, Gerda, and their dog, Trixie, in southern California.

Chapter seventeen Chapter eighteen Chapter nineteen Chapter twenty Chapter twenty-one Jack Finney. Jack Finney Invasion of The Body Snatchers

Chapter seventeen Chapter eighteen Chapter nineteen Chapter twenty Chapter twenty-one Jack Finney. Jack Finney Invasion of The Body Snatchers. Chapter one. I warn you that what you're starting to read is full of loose ends and unanswered questions. We have a special on appendectomies this week," I called gaily; "better stock up," and she turned to smile. Her figure, I saw, following along after her, was still marvelous. Becky has a fine, beautifully fleshed skeleton; too wide in the hips, I've heard women say, but I never heard a man say it. "No," – Becky stopped at my desk, and turned to answer my question – "this isn't a professional call exactly.

Jack Finney's novel is also a snapshot of 1950s small town American - many are the allusions made to the times when . As we discover toward the end of the book, The Body Snatchers is also a tale of the hero’s journey, a journey requiring great courage and wits.

Jack Finney's novel is also a snapshot of 1950s small town American - many are the allusions made to the times when Miles was growing up, visiting the local library, dating Becky in high school, seeing all the familiar faces around town. But, now, as Miles and Becky walk down Mill Valley's main street, they can see the entire town is altered, nearly dead - rarely do they see anybody outside and all the trash and litter scattered about makes for one dirty, grubby Mill Valley.

It will not be neatly tied up at the end, everything resolved and satisfactorily explained. Not by me it won't, anyway began, how it ended, o. . Not by me it won't, anyway began, how it ended, or if it has ended; and I've been right in the thick of it. Now if you don't like that kind of story, I'm sorry, and you'd better not read it. All I can do is tell what I know

The Body Snatchers is a 1955 science fiction novel by American writer Jack Finney, originally serialized in Colliers Magazine in 1954, which describes real-life Mill Valley, California.

The Body Snatchers is a 1955 science fiction novel by American writer Jack Finney, originally serialized in Colliers Magazine in 1954, which describes real-life Mill Valley, California (called in the original film by the fictional name of "Santa Mira") being invaded by seeds that have drifted to Earth from space.

Invasion of The Body Snatchers. While Miles’s patients start remarking about loved ones not seeming to be themselves, he merely chalks it up to paranoia. However, when he becomes witness to a distinct but subtle change in the personality of some townspeople, he and his friends realize something is afoot. Their fears are realized as they stumble upon faceless corpses and strange pods.

The Body Snatchers gave us the term pod people - for alien beings that can disguise themselves as humans .

The Body Snatchers gave us the term pod people - for alien beings that can disguise themselves as humans, killing those whom they emulate, until they've used up and destroyed a civilization. The reason for the story’s popularity is obvious. It’s scary enough in fiction, but even in 2015, modern day body snatchers in state legislatures and Congress are trying to take over women's bodies and insinuate themselves into our most personal decision making. These political pod people have coordinated a full body snatching assault, passing hundreds of burdensome laws designed to take bodily autonomy away from the people they are supposed to represent.

Поиск книг BookFi BookSee - Download books for free. Finney, Jack - Invasion of the Body Snatchers.

The Stephen King Horror Library, 2005. The text follows the 1978 revised edition, with a 1981 introduction by Stephen King. This is part of The Stephen King Horror Library, available through the Science Fiction Book Club.

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The author loosely develops a fascinating concept that later provided a veritable sandbox of inspirations and interpretations for years of analysis. This book has been combed over for allegorical meanings through the years, mostly brought on by the various film adaptions. Finney himself denied having had any such agenda other than pure entertainment.

Even still, it is easy to read into this work a tale that strives to spotlights the virtue of individuality in the face of conformity. Whether the mashing conglomeration of society is brought about by political ideology, mob mentality or consumerism, doesn’t really matter.

The writing is easy to read and the plot plods along at a nice pace, without speeding up too much or slowing down too little. The story pauses enough times at well-crafted scenes of horror to create a lasting impression of the core storyline. The dialog felt somewhat stilted, if not dated or formal (sort of like an old 1950’s TV show).

The book has been criticized for its lack of scientific plausibility or credible character developments. However, this story isn’t really meant to be hard Scifi or an in-depth character study. The book is built around a high concept and contains a decent suspense plot that is tempered with Scifi elements. In that sense it largely succeeds. There is also a dogged relentlessness pervading the story that keeps pace throughout and helps to keep the horror aspect in play.

The story centers around a medical doctor operating in a rural town as a general practitioner. He’s divorced and an old flame/fellow divorcee is back in town for him to get excited about. His love interest draws him into the main plot when she asks him to look in on a relative that has a peculiar medical concern that cannot be explained. From there things slowly develop based on the increasing incidences of people acting strangely and the stakes are periodically raised a level along the way. The author does delve into the science behind the story a bit when he uses the doctor and a psychologist to both unravel as well as confuse the mystery.

There are some interesting passages about the different faces people wear in society and what it means to be a person, along with some loose social commentary that gets flipped on its head when it comes from an alien perspective.

The ending has also been criticized for this book and the film versions did not feel the need to follow it. It’s an ending, it works, but that’s about it. Reminds me a bit of an H. G. Wells ending, but less original given the publication date.

The very idea of “pod people” comes from this book. Without having even read this book or watched any of the films, most people will have a general idea of what this means. That, in itself, demonstrates how strong the concept is and how well it was developed by the author.

Podcast: If you enjoy my review (or this topic) this book and the movie based on it were further discussed/debated in a lively discussion on my podcast: "No Deodorant In Outer Space". The podcast is available on iTunes, Tune-In Radio, Stitcher, Google Play Music, YouTube or our website.
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Something unusual is happening in Mill Valley, California in October 1976…

“I’d grown up here, from boyhood I’d known every street, house and path, most of the backyards, and every hill, field and road for miles around. And now I didn’t know it anymore. Unchanged to the eye, what I was seeing out there—in my eye, and beyond that in my mind—was something alien…”

For Miles Bennell, local town physician, Mill Valley is being turned upside down. It begins with a rather unusual call from a resident, a woman who says her uncle isn’t really her uncle. Something seems to be taking over the humans…

To me, Invasion of the Body Snatchers is one of the definitive science fiction novels. It has an expertly crafted atmosphere and elements that are staples of the genre. There’s a level of genius by Finney in so expertly playing the chaos and bizarre events directly in a quiet town and creating immediately a strange phenomenon that propels the plot. In my opinion, this is as expertly plotted as to increase the suspense and anticipation of what is to follow as we progress. We see this in the arrival of the pods and there is fear and wonder trying to unearth who is human and who isn’t.

A paranoid, frantic mood consumes and pervades throughout, as told through the perspective of Miles, as they try to escape the unknown entity or understand its plan.

My version has a wonderful introduction by author Dean Koontz where he sheds some insight into his feelings about what makes this novel a great sci fi experience. I can only echo those thoughts.

There are two distinctive films that are based on Finney’s novel, one more closely. One in 1956 that more closely resembles the plot and feel of the book and then one in 1978 that is not as stellar.

A great book for sci-fi enthusiasts, especially who love the classic feel to the genre. This is what sci-fi should feel like, and it is perfect reading on a clear summer night. Before you do, though, be sure to check the garage for any pods