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by Margot Livesey
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Genre Fiction
  • Author:
    Margot Livesey
  • ISBN:
    0061451541
  • ISBN13:
    978-0061451546
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Harper Perennial; Reprint edition (May 5, 2009)
  • Pages:
    311 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Genre Fiction
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1170 kb
  • ePUB format
    1354 kb
  • DJVU format
    1407 kb
  • Rating:
    4.4
  • Votes:
    428
  • Formats:
    lit doc txt lit


Eva Moves the Furniture: A Novel. I read mostly nonfiction, but sometimes I feel the need for lighter work. The House on Fortune Street works for that while making me process its themes beyond the short time it took to read

Eva Moves the Furniture: A Novel. The House on Fortune Street works for that while making me process its themes beyond the short time it took to read. At first I thought that the issue was Euthanasia, and I noted with interest that "helpers" in that area might have to find themselves an alibi when the one ending his or her life decided that the time had come.

Of course he had yearned after expensive books and sometimes, walking at night, he and Judy had stopped to gaze enviously through the windows of the large lit-up houses, but for the most part his needs had fitted his income.

Электронная книга "The House on Fortune Street: A Novel", Margot Livesey

Электронная книга "The House on Fortune Street: A Novel", Margot Livesey. Эту книгу можно прочитать в Google Play Книгах на компьютере, а также на устройствах Android и iOS. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "The House on Fortune Street: A Novel" для чтения в офлайн-режиме.

The House on Fortune Street (2008). Livesey dedicated her first book, Learning by Heart (1986), to them.

Margot Livesey is the New York Times bestselling author of the novels The Flight of Gemma Hardy, The House on Fortune Street, Banishing Verona, Eva Moves the Furniture, The Missing World, Criminals, and Homework. Her work has appeared in the New Yorker, Vogue, and the Atlantic, and she is the recipient of grants from both the National Endowment for the Arts and the Guggenheim Foundation. The House on Fortune Street won the 2009 L. L. Winship/PEN New England Award. Born in Scotland, Livesey currently lives in the Boston area and is a professor of fiction at the Iowa Writers’ Workshop.

I gave notice at work and applied for a job in London. were now all Fiona’s. As for my mother I tried several times to explain that I was moving and would be visiting less often. She nodded and continued to describe the night she’d first seen radar. And then the beam leaped up, she said, clasping her hands, smiling.

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Writing About Literature: An Anthology for Reading and Writing. Lynn Klamkin, Margot Livesey.

It seems like mutual good luck for Abigail Taylor and Dara MacLeod when they meet at university and, despite their differences, become fast friends. Years later they remain inseparable: Abigail, the actress, allegedly immune to romance, and Dara, a therapist, throwing herself into relationships with frightening intensity. Now both believe they've found "true love." But luck seems to run out when Dara moves into Abigail's downstairs apartment. Suddenly both their friendship and their relationships are in peril, for tragedy is waiting to strike the house on Fortune Street.

Told through four ingeniously interlocking narratives, Margot Livesey's The House on Fortune Street is a provocative tale of lives shaped equally by chance and choice.


Not-the-Same
I read mostly nonfiction, but sometimes I feel the need for lighter work. The House on Fortune Street works for that while making me process its themes beyond the short time it took to read. At first I thought that the issue was Euthanasia, and I noted with interest that "helpers" in that area might have to find themselves an alibi when the one ending his or her life decided that the time had come. Then I realized that the main claim in the work had more to do with the impact of something at a pivotal time in a person's life, often the reaction to parent's behavior or personality. Remember how John Knowles in A Separate Peace uses an impulse of the moment to affect the individual's life. This work will probably mean more to those who reflect a great deal. For those who don't bother it still makes an entertaining read to use as a diversion. The focus on more than one character at times shifts too abruptly, yet it enables us to gain a clearer understanding of each person's responses to others and to those they are connected by family connection or proximity. Now I need another work of fiction before I tackle my next more extended text.
Kigabar
This is a story of four characters who are damaged from childhood disasters that have molded them. They have numerous close relationships (mostly sexual), but none of them can sustain relationships. This has been done so many times - 20-somethings moving in and out of relationships while trying to make sense of and deal with the traumas of their pasts. Much of the book feels like the reader has read it many times before, although even in the shop-worn parts the author inserts unexpected and fresh elements that show how well she is capable of writing. She also interweaves literature and literary references throughout the text, using them deftly to illuminate the main characters. In an interview Livesey says she gave "each character what I call a `literary godparent.'" Sean's is Keats. Cameron's is Charles Dodgson (aka Lewis Carroll). Dara's is Charlotte Bronte, especially Jane Eyre. Abigail's is Charles Dickens. The novel is told in four sections, each from the point of view of one of the main characters. This is handled fairly well, and adds resonance to the novel. Cameron is the most (only?) unique character, and his section is the most engaging.
Thordira
The House on Fortune Street is suspenseful and compelling. It's filled with enough allusions to Dickens and Bronte to keep the literature lover engaged without being heavy handed. And while I do admit to rolling my eyes once or twice in response to the organic-wine-loving, Keats-quoting, angst-filled characters, I never thought the author was pretentious. I know it's hard to believe, but it's true.

The book also raises some interesting ethical questions for our generation. In an age when moral relativism trumps moral absolutism in governing our secular sensibilities, to what moral authority, if any, do we appeal when deciding who we can and cannot love? What is legitimate love, and what is off-limits? Through her characters' fates, the author demonstrates that simply "following our hearts" is not a sufficient compass for navigating the complicated web of our relationships, and often has terrible, long-lasting consequences. The author doesn't provide the answers, but she at least gives us something to think about.

Simultaneously sophisticated and suspenseful, thoughtful and fact-paced, this is the ideal summer read. I really enjoyed it.
Legionstatic
This is an interesting study in relationships. Starting out from the point of view of one of the male leads, it skips around to tell the same story, more or less, from other points of view. So the major players each get to map out their own versions of events. It's kind of weird at times, because one person's story doesn't necessarily follow the same timeline as another's. But they all converge, particularly around a troubled female lead who lives at the house in the title. When tragedy happens, who is to blame? It is never as simple as it might seem, and this novel deliberately deconstructs a personal tragedy by presenting it through the eyes of the people involved.I thought it was well-written and it held my interest, but there is definitely a feeling of let down at the end. I don't know what I was expecting--certainly not a car chase. But it was probably more realistic than most in that people do just go on in the groove they've set for themselves and simply move past significant events. Some grieve, some grow, and some just move on.