Download The Willow Field fb2

by William Kittredge
Download The Willow Field fb2
Genre Fiction
  • Author:
    William Kittredge
  • ISBN:
    0786293535
  • ISBN13:
    978-0786293537
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Thorndike Pr (March 7, 2007)
  • Pages:
    633 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Genre Fiction
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1608 kb
  • ePUB format
    1394 kb
  • DJVU format
    1936 kb
  • Rating:
    4.4
  • Votes:
    639
  • Formats:
    txt doc lit azw


As part-time resident and full-time observer, William Kittredge acquaints us with one of the country's most vital and perpetually evolving regions.

As part-time resident and full-time observer, William Kittredge acquaints us with one of the country's most vital and perpetually evolving regions

William Kittredge (born 1932) is an American writer from Oregon, United States, who has then been mostly living in Missoula, Montana.

William Kittredge (born 1932) is an American writer from Oregon, United States, who has then been mostly living in Missoula, Montana. He was born in 1932 in Portland, Oregon, and grew up on a ranch in Southeastern Oregon's Warner Valley in Lake County where he attended school in Adel, Oregon, and later would attend high school in California and Oregon. He earned his undergraduate degree in agriculture from Oregon State University.

The Willow Field, Kittredge, William. Варианты приобретения. Описание: After numerous essays, short stories and the heralded memoir A Hole in the Sky, William Kittredge gives us a debut novel that ratifies his standing as a leading writer of the American West. Кол-во: о цене Наличие: Отсутствует. Возможна поставка под заказ. Rossie Benasco's horseback existence begins at age 15 and culminates in a thousand-mile drive of more than 200 head of horses through the Rockies into Calgary.

William Kittredge is the author of Hole in the Sky, a memoir; two collections of essays, The Nature of Generosity and Owning It All; and two collections of stories, The Van Gogh Fields and We Are Not in This Together. A co-producer of the movie A River Runs Through It, he grew up on his family ranch in Oregon, studied at Oregon State University and the University of Iowa, and was Regents Professor at the University of Montana for decades.

The Willow Field book. Annie Dillard has called him one of our finest writers  . To understand William Kittredge’s The Willow Field one first has to read his masterpiece memoir Hole in the Sky and Wallace Stegner’s Big Rock Candy Mountain (Mr. Kittredge was a Wallace Stegner Fellow at Stanford). Even reading the first chapter of Hole in the Sky conveys a deeply thoughtful philosophy about the meaning of one’s life.

He grew up in Oregon and now lives in Missoula, Montana, where for many year. ore about William Kittredge. Category: Literary Fiction. This book is as much about the legacies of a territory& colorful past as it is about the exciting and daunting complexities of its immediate future. Автор: Sutter, Kurt Kittredge, Caitlin Название: Lucas stand ISBN: 160886961X ISBN-13(EAN): 9781608869619 Издательство: Неизвестно Рейтинг

Annie Dillard has called him one of our finest writers. Jane Smiley has declared his voice prophetic. Now, at long last-after two collections of stories

Annie Dillard has called him one of our finest writers. After numerous essays, short stories and the heralded memoir A Hole in the Sky, William Kittredge gives us a debut novel that ratifies his standing as a leading writer of the American West.

The book chronicles the life and times of Rossie Benasco, the son of a Reno, Ne. casino boss. Rossie’s decision to leave home to become a ranch hand leads him on many life adventures. We Pointed Them North by . Teddy Blue Abbott (Univ.

In 1934, Rossie Benasco's cowboy lifestyle culminates in a thousand-mile drive through the Rocky Mountains into Calgary, a journey that leads him to Eliza Stevenson and a desire to spend the rest of his life with her on a Montana ranch.

Yozshujind
I loved this novel. One of the best books I've read. Simple language, complex story, evoloving characters = an amazing read.
Funky
Kittredge is a fine short story writer; one of the best. Read to page 74 of this novel and you will be entertained by a fine story, well told, about a young man signing on with a horse drive from northern California to Calgary. Set in the worst years of the Depression, it calls to mind an era when America and the American West were a very different place from what they are today.

You can put the book down at that point because what follows is a long meandering search for any further illumination of the subjects it has raised. Most frustrating are the characters' impulsiveness and lack of apparent motivation or the need to explain themselves. When they talk, they talk at each other, preferring irony to revealing what they actually think or feel. Since the central character, Rossie, seems only to follow the path of least resistance, trusting to luck, his actions are chiefly determined by his libido - and there are plenty of scenes of how that plays out. But it's a life that remains unexamined - either by Rossie himself or by Kittredge.

I hung on until half-way through the novel and finally jumped to the end, where I found nothing that gave me the idea I'd missed anything. The characters were still opaque and unreflective, still drinking and engaged in bantering, aimless conversations. I've never posted a review here for a book that I haven't read cover to cover, and I hesitate doing that this time. But Kittredge fans and any reader preferring depth of character, a strong story line, a vivid portrayal of history or geography, or any one of the above, should know that they may find this novel less than absorbing.
Mori
To understand William Kittredge’s The Willow Field one first has to read his masterpiece memoir Hole in the Sky and Wallace Stegner’s Big Rock Candy Mountain (Mr. Kittredge was a Wallace Stegner Fellow at Stanford). Even reading the first chapter of Hole in the Sky conveys a deeply thoughtful philosophy about the meaning of one’s life. In that chapter Kittredge says that perhaps the purpose of our lives is connected with the pleasure of simply repeating the names of those things which become sacred to us as a result of a life-long familiarity such as in Kittredge’s case the names of the thousands of waterfowl that crossed his grandfather’s ranch when he was a boy. The second book which sheds light on The Willow Field, Big Rock Candy Mountain, is not plot-driven it simply tells a life which is deeply connected with the land where Stegner grew up and which allows the reader to extract whatever meaning he wants from Stegner’s view of true life. There is a recurring image at the end of Stegner’s book that of a bird of prey eating a snake. Stegner’s character wonders if that image he remembered so vividly from childhood might not symbolize the importance of the physical world which gives a kind of simple meaning to our lives. The implication is that the physical world and our memories of it need not be supplemented by extraneous philosophical ideas in order for our lives to have existential meaning. We may be here on earth simply to witness and to marvel at this incredible world we have been given. Many of the complaints about The Willow Field I have read on this site seem to be about the book’s meandering pace. Some readers have been puzzled to understand what the author is getting at. Having taken Mr. Kittredge’s writing courses I can guarantee you that each of those meanders has a purpose. The author is not moving in the structure of a normal problem to resolution plot. I believe this novel is more like the reporting of a life stretching from about 1914 through the 20th century. It reflects the importance of love and within love the importance of having a mate who constantly pushes one to greater positive achievements.

Another theme of the book is a reflection on the politics of the 20th century. His main character seems to be a witness to the sad propensity of the American body politic to want instant fixes and to want never to have to think about complex ideas. Other reviewers scoffed at some of the bawdiness among the horsemen and women of the West. I think they are ill-informed from experience about the rough direct bawdiness of the Wild West as it continued to exist through the period of this novel. Mr. Kittredge grew up on a ranch that controlled many thousands of acres of ranch land. He rode with the roughneck cowboys and is well-acquainted with their ways.

The Willow Field tells the story of two main characters who are, in fact, quite different. These two characters represent the quintessential male force and the quintessential female force. They are able by constant power struggles, conflict, and compromise to form a beautiful unity whose achievements are far beyond what they could have done separately. The main character looks back on his life in the last scene and considers it to have been the greatest good luck to have met and stuck with his wife. There is a beautiful sentence which ends the book and continues the theme of wonder which we feel about the objects and causes which have been important to the main characters. The main character’s son wonders how his father, and by extension, all the people with whom they are connected has been able to reach the last days of his life and manage to heal all the abrasions which have been received and dealt out. I think this summarizes the author’s belief which he has tried to flesh out in his book, that life and this physical world is a sacred wonder, that love is everything, and that we humans, if we move towards positive intention, are an incredibly resilient people who can, as Richard Hugo says, “eat stone and go on.”
Brialelis
This novel does a good job with people and the rest is not as good. Fortunately, there is a lot more of it about people than anything else. The latter part of the book is much better than the front part. At a third of the way through I was going to give it two stars, the middle third gained it another star, and only memories of the beginning kept the last third from raising it to five stars.

This is the story of a boy, Rossie, and the progress of his growth as he lives out his life in the Bitterroot Valley of western Montana. Rossie begins as a cowboy in Nevada and remains a horseman all his life. After he encounters Eliza, she becomes a key element of the story. A number of other people enter the story at intervals and, as is the case in life, most remain more or less connected to the end. A few of the bit players are typical westerners, but the psyches of the main characters are too unique to call typical.

Kittredge is almost an icon of Montana literature, although this is his first novel. He has filled this book with a great deal of what he has learned about Montana over decades, perhaps he includes too much. There are countless descriptions of experiences, events, and geographical features recognizable by those familiar with Montana and its history. If you are an aficionado of Montana literature, you might want to read this book with a notebook at hand and see how many allusions you recognize to other books. Some Kittredge spells out and others are subtle. One of the more obvious is the Missoula minister who is supposed to marry Rossie; his name is Dr. McLean and "they're legendary walkers and fishermen, two brothers and the father." There are probably some references that were accidental but are simply part of Kittredge's vast knowledge of the state. If this book had a bibliography, it would be at least three pages; small type.

One weakness, especially in the front part of the book, is some inaccuracies in time and space. Even a novel should be careful how it treats such things. When trailing the horse herd through Oregon on the way to Calgary, how could Steens Mountain be to the east? A little later, the description of the horse drive jumps from the entry into Montana at Monida Pass all the way to Choteau. That is a gutless thing for the writer to do; there are a lot of miles and a lot of difficulty in that gap. In addition, the timeline from the beginning of the drive until Rossie arrives back in the Flathead Valley is not credible.

One last criticism concerns three vulgar words. Remove them and the novel would be pages shorter. Westerners used such words very sparingly during the first two-thirds of the twentieth century, and almost never in mixed company. Their frequent usage damages the authenticity of story.

Readers of novels usually try to discern the messages or concepts the writer intends to convey. There is an interesting sentence near the back of the book: "People in Montana know what happened to the Indians, and they see that it's happening to them." Much of this book is about protecting what is wonderful about Montana from being ruined by people who don't take time to recognize those values. A connected concern is those people who move to Montana and bring along the very habits that made where they came from inferior to Montana.