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by Lawrence R. Kelleher
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Genre Fiction
  • Author:
    Lawrence R. Kelleher
  • ISBN:
    0595169260
  • ISBN13:
    978-0595169269
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    iUniverse (January 15, 2001)
  • Pages:
    280 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Genre Fiction
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1156 kb
  • ePUB format
    1383 kb
  • DJVU format
    1395 kb
  • Rating:
    4.7
  • Votes:
    357
  • Formats:
    mobi lrf mbr docx


However, for centuries, Irish folklore or various books had referred to the captive servants as Irish "slaves" even into . Kelleher, Lawrence R. (2001-01-15). To Shed a Tear: A Story of Irish Slavery in the British West Indies. p. 73. ISBN 0595169260.

However, for centuries, Irish folklore or various books had referred to the captive servants as Irish "slaves" even into the 20th century. During the 17th century, tens of thousands of British and Irish indentured servants immigrated to British America.

To Shed a Tear: A Story . .has been added to your Cart. The Zulu did not exist until founded by Shaka Zulu in the early 20th century. The author's use of these terms would be like having the US fighting Attila the Hun in a modern war using Civil War weapons in Antartica

To Shed a Tear: A Story . The author's use of these terms would be like having the US fighting Attila the Hun in a modern war using Civil War weapons in Antartica. Purely imaginary and anachronistic. The hero of the story is an Irish clan chief, when the English pretty much ended the clan system a century before this story takes place and replaced it with English style Earldoms.

A shameful chapter in English/Irish history. A shameful chapter in English/Irish history. The brutal oppression by a tyrannical foreign government of 80,000 Irish intellectuals, who were put in chains and shipped to the British West Indies against their will, to work as 'slaves' in the fields (circa 1649). The deliberate destruction of all Irish religious and cultural symbols (churches, schools and libraries), in Ire A shameful chapter in English/Irish history.

Lawrence R. Kelleher, To shed a tear - A story of Irish slavery in the British West Indies (2001), 73. The settlers began to breed Irish women and girls with African men to produce slaves with a distinct complexion

Lawrence R. The settlers began to breed Irish women and girls with African men to produce slaves with a distinct complexion. These new mulatto slaves brought a higher price than Irish livestock and, likewise, enabled the settlers to save money rather than purchase new African slaves.

The brutal oppression by a tyrannical foreign government of 80,000 Irish intellectuals, who were put in chains and shipped to the British West Indies against their will, to work as 'slaves' in the fields (circa 1649).

Trade Paperback (Us),Unsewn, Adhesive Bound. Country of Publication.

To Shed a Tear A Story of Irish Slavery in the British West Indies by Lawrence R Kelleher 9780595169269 (Paperback, 2001) Delivery UK delivery is usually within 7 to 9 working days. Read full description. See details and exclusions. Trade Paperback (Us),Unsewn, Adhesive Bound.

A Story of Irish Slavery in the British West Indies. There's no description for this book yet. by Lawrence R. Kelleher. Kelleher, To shed a tear – A story of Irish slavery in the British West Indies (2001), . 3. Female Irish slaves were raped by their owners and bred to male African slaves to produce offspring who would grow into big, strong, mulatto slaves. Maggie Plummer, Spirited Away – A Novel of the Stolen Irish (2012).

The Irish slaves were sent to British territories in the Caribbean. Or is their story to be one that their English pirates intended: To (unlike the African book) have the Irish story utterly and completely disappear as if it never happened. They were categorized as indentured workers and servants of the English colonial elites. England’s Irish Slaves. By Robert E. West, June 09, 2016. None of the Irish victims ever made it back to their homeland to describe their ordeal. These are the lost slaves; the ones that time and biased history books conveniently forgot. The original source of this article is Oped News.

To Shed a Tear: A Story of Irish Slavery in the British West Indies. In The Winter King and Enemy of God Bernard Cornwell demonstrated his astonishing ability to make the oft-told legend of King Arthur fresh and new for our time. To Shed a Tear : A Story of Irish Slavery in the British West Indies. A Flaw in the Blood by Stephanie Barron - Bantam - ISBN 10 0553384449 - ISBN 13 0553384449 - Preparing A Flaw in the Blood by Stephani. ind this Pin and more on Historical Fiction by Kidaoo Book Summaries. Excalibur (The Warlord Chronicles) by Bernard Cornwell. Excalibur (the Warlord Chronicles), Cover Images May Vary.

'The brutal oppression by a tyrannical foreign government of 80,000 Irish intellectuals, who were put in chains and shipped to the British West Indies against their will, to work as 'slaves' in the fields (circa 1649). The deliberate destruction of all Irish religious and cultural symbols (churches, schools and libraries), in Ireland and the taking away of all 'civil rights' of the Irish citizens, while forcing the Irish property owners off of their land. The slaughtering of thousands of innocent civilians using the term, "Divine Providence," by an English madman, Sir Oliver Cromwell, as his armies swept across Ireland acting out his personal vengeance against the Irish people. To try and humiliate an entire population by trying to destroy the Irish will to live and survive for over two hundred years. A sad chapter of a colonial empire whose arrogance, brutality and the subjugation of the people it conquered, could easily be ranked as possibly the most evil of all the worlds monarchies, when compared could easily be ranked as possibly the most evil of all the worlds monarchies, when compared to any of the Asiatic despots, who roamed the world seeking power and wealth. Added to this tragedy was an equally tragic natural calamity, the Irish potato famine of 1846-1850.'

Alsardin
I bought this book hoping it would be a work of historical fiction about the period in Caribbean history that included the deportation and enslavement of thousands of Irish men, women and children. The book proports to be about this time, but instead reverts to a purely fictitious action story full of inaccuracies, unlikely adventures and anachronisms. Not much in it about Irish slavery. It revolves around the story of a group of Irish brothers captured during Cromwell's ethnic cleansing of Ireland beginning in 1649. As a person interested in Caribbean history I found the lack of any serious attempt to place this unlikely adventure story in the context of real history disconcerting. The author has the Dutch in charge of St. Croix with a large military base there confronting English enemies in the Caribbean through commando raids, which the Irish brothers join. I looked up the Dutch involvement on St. Croix and by the time of the story any Dutch settlers on St. Croix had abandonned the island after a dispute with the English who shared the island in the first part of the 1600's. The English were later driven out by the Spanish in 1646, to be replaced by the French and the Knights of Malta. So there was likely no time that any large presence of Dutch soldiers or navy existed on St. Croix and never without a significant joint English and French settlement, though the whole place likely had less than 600 settlers at the time. The author also has a "Papiamento" people living on the various islands, including St. Christopher, as natives, presumably Indians. The actual Papiamento is a trade language used in the Dutch islands off Venezuela and likely has no relation to any Native American group, but more likely some African, Spanish and Portuguese origins. The native people of St. Croix were Arawaks or Caribs and were early on expelled from the Leewards by the Europeans. The author has the Dutch under a royal government with ships named after Dutch kings and queens, when the Netherlands was still a republic until the 19th century. He has the "Zulu" slave overseer, Konga, captured in a war with the Tutsi. The Tutsi lived thousands of miles from the Zulu and were not really a constituted ethnic group until they came under the rule of the Germans in the late 19th century and were defined as a group by the Belgians in the 20th Century. The Zulu did not exist until founded by Shaka Zulu in the early 20th century. The author's use of these terms would be like having the US fighting Attila the Hun in a modern war using Civil War weapons in Antartica. Purely imaginary and anachronistic.
The hero of the story is an Irish clan chief, when the English pretty much ended the clan system a century before this story takes place and replaced it with English style Earldoms. The Dutch are supposed to be at war with the English but the first Anglo-Dutch War didn't begin until 1652, which was a bit after this story was supposed to be taking place. The use of trained commandos seems unlikely for the time, and the use of military time to designate when to start commando actions, as in 06:00 on the dot, is unlikely because digital wristwatches were not invented yet. It is also unlikely that a sextant would be stowed in a long boat, as it was an expensive piece of equipment and likely only in the hands of the ship's master. Outriggers on canoes were characteristic of the Pacific islands, not the canoes of the Caribbean Indians, and canoes cannot be steared by only using the sails but must be steared using a rudder or more likely a stern paddle as a rudder. Geography is off also, as the author has the ships carrying the Irish slaves headed for the Southern Hemisphere, when all of the Caribbean is north of the Equator. There are also frequent misspellings that were not edited out of the text.
If you are looking for historical fiction that depicts life in the times of Cromwell and Irish slavery in the Caribbean this is not the book for you. If you want to read a purely imaginary adventure story for light reading and entainment, with lots of historical inaccuracies and not much realism, then it is an OK read.
Jim
salivan
I have only read up to Chapter 3 of this book and this is what I think so far:

I'm giving it three stars because the author is clearly proud of his heritage and I appreciate his wont to tell the story of his family, but so far things are not going very well.

I don't know who, if anyone, edited this book, but the sentence structure is terrible. There are commas everywhere, EVERYWHERE, and so many other punctuations errors not to mention the author's confusing "of coarse" for "of course"... common errors are abundant, to say the least. Every sentence of dialogue has its own set of quotations marks. I don't want to sound like a snob or anything, but visually it creates a fragmented and jarring text. My imagination is being constantly put on hold, making it nearly impossible for me to enjoy the story in its base form, at least. Luckily for the author, I'm interested in the subject matter in general and I've already spent the money. Having said that...

I'm going to keep reading with the hope that his passion for his family will translate into a story worth knowing, however poorly written, but I am having my doubts.

Just because someone is from 17th century inland Kilkenny it does not mean he has never experienced nor has he heard of a hurricane before, especially if he is educated enough to read and has people living on the coast. Have a little more faith in your ancestors than that, please, Mr. Kelleher.
Grari
This little yarn is painful to read, not because of its context, but because the history is so badly mangled. The savage story of Irish slavery is one that needs to be told, but the author missed an opportunity by failing to research the subject properly and consequently wasting his efforts by producing a piece of literary trash.