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by Tim Pigott-Smith,Bernard Cornwell
Download Heretic (The Grail Quest, Book 3) fb2
Genre Fiction
  • Author:
    Tim Pigott-Smith,Bernard Cornwell
  • ISBN:
    0060566132
  • ISBN13:
    978-0060566135
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    HarperAudio (October 7, 2003)
  • Subcategory:
    Genre Fiction
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1147 kb
  • ePUB format
    1641 kb
  • DJVU format
    1841 kb
  • Rating:
    4.3
  • Votes:
    735
  • Formats:
    txt lit mobi lrf


Narrated by Tim Pigott-Smith. The eagerly anticipated follow-up to the number one bestseller Vagabond, this is the third instalment in Bernard Cornwell's Grail Quest series. In 1347 the English capture Calais and the war with France is suspended by a truce.

Narrated by Tim Pigott-Smith. But for Thomas of Hookton, the hero of Harlequin and Vagabond, there is no end to the fighting.

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Home Bernard Cornwell The Grail Quest Books 1-3: Harlequin, Vagabond, Heretic. He collected books which, after the treasure he had brought to the church, were the greatest marvels in Hookton. The grail quest books . .The Grail Quest Books 1-3: Harlequin, Vagabond, Heretic, . Sometimes, when he left his door open, people would just gape at the seventeen books that were bound in leather and piled on a table. Most were in Latin, but a handful were in French, which was Father Ralph's native tongue.

Heretic by Bernard Cornwell - Book Three of The Grail Quest. I would have made all three parts of the book into just one book

Heretic by Bernard Cornwell - Book Three of The Grail Quest. This is the conclusion of The Grail Series by Bernard Cornwell. The book opens with the battle of Nieulay, where the French defeat the British. I would have made all three parts of the book into just one book. The author could have saved the trouble of describing what had transpired in previous books, thus shortening the length of the tale and avoiding having to repeat himself to make each book stand on its own. I read the book in three days and I recommend the book to anyone who, like me, enjoys historical fiction. One person found this helpful.

Books related to Heretic (The Grail Quest, Book 3. A brilliant finale to The Grail Quest series. You feel as you are there in the middle of what is happening.

Books related to Heretic (The Grail Quest, Book 3). Skip this list. Really well written, full of tension and drama.

In Harlequin he is involved in battle in Brittany and subsequently at the Battle of Crécy.

HERETIC ( GRAIL QUEST, BOOK 3) By Bernard Cornwell - Hardcover BRAND NEW . Heretic is a great read and I highly recommend it. This third book in the Grail Quest Series ties up all the loose ends from the previous 2 books but could also be read by itself. A great storyteller and writer of historical fiction, the author keeps the reader involved in the story and character development. He has the writing skills to transport the reader into the actual story's place and time.

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Thomas of Hookton is a seasoned veteran of King Edward's army and a natural leader in what will be remembered as the Hundred Years' War. Accompanied by a small but able band of soldiers, Thomas is sent to Gascony to capture the castle of Astarac. But he has ulterior motives for accepting the charge: Gascony is the home of the black knight -- Guy de Vexille -- who brutally slaughtered his father. It is also reputed to be the place where the Grail was last seen.

While capturing Astarac, Thomas learns of a tragedy in the making: a beautiful young woman named Genevieve, innocent if not pious, is to be burned as a heretic. Thomas prevents the corrupt local priest from carrying out his "God -- given" duty -- a sacrilege that turns him into an outcast, even among his own men. Eventually he and Genevieve have no choice but to flee. While hidden away at a monastery, they learn of a plot involving the creation of an imitation Grail for a diabolical end; and they witness the murder of a trusted priest at the hands of Guy de Vexille.

At last reconciled with his allies, Thomas leads his brave band in a bloody battle to the death, the outcome of which could determine the seat of power -- and the direction of Christendom -- forevermore.


CrazyDemon
Complex story that was well told and as I've often said of Cornwell, he gives nothing away for free to his characters. This story is packed with internal and external conflict, intense action and one disappointment after another for all of the main characters. Cornwell builds strong, complex, believable characters that are fraught with the human condition. His adversaries are worthy of each other and quite formidable. I like Cornwell's story telling and have been a fan since I read the Sharpe series. Cornwell does his homework and learns the historical context the story is written in and then provides that context as if it is scenery laced into the background of the actions the characters are living through. Heretic is well written and is a story just like any other great story I've read in that I love historical fiction but Heretic would fit in any context if done well enough and Cornwell has done so. I highly recommend the book and suggest you begin with The Archer's Tale (US Title) and read them all the way through. This is hours of entertainment for a paltry sum.
White gold
I have read at least of dozen of Cornwell's books. Biggest problem I have with Cornwell is that they are so terribly predictable. There is always a some version of the cliche' evil priest somewhere in the story, always. Just kills the rest of the story for me. I truly enjoy the genre, and the craftsmanship is always good, well researched etc etc etc but gee whiz give the evil priest thing a break.
Alien
The closing volume successfully closes the important conflicts between England and France with descriptions of yet more unlikely, but historically factual, battle field victories. Not to "tell", but much as the fictional hero is a device to place us in sight and earshot of historical events, the Grail Quest itself is a device to draw that hero to the scenes the author wishes him to narrate for us. And just when I thought the ending was going to be anticlimactic, I was surprised by yet another unexpected turn. So, I pulled out my copy of the author's, "Agincourt," and indulged myself in another tale of fact, however improbable. I urge you to do the same.
Arabella V.
Heretic by Bernard Cornwell - Book Three of The Grail Quest

This is the conclusion of The Grail Series by Bernard Cornwell. The book opens with the battle of Nieulay, where the French defeat the British. However, unable to cross the River Ham, and engage the British army, the French withdrew and Calais fell to the British.

Thomas is commanded by the Lord of Northampton to seek the Grail and take back some of his lands in Gascony. Thomas, commanding men at arms and British arches take the Castillon d’Arbizon and saves a heretic woman, Genevieve, from being burned at the stake. As Thomas’ men plunder the countryside for food and provisions, they are engaged in troubles. Genevieve kills father Roubert, her inquisitor, and the bishops declare Thomas and Genevieve heretics. Two groups are formed - one lead by Robbie Douglass, Thomas Scottish friend, and the other by Sir Guillaume d’Evecque. Robbie wants to burn Genevieve and turn Thomas to the church, and Sir Guillaume pledges allegiance to Thomas. Thomas is forced to leave his men under Sir Guillaume and he and Genevieve become fugitives.

They are attacked by corridors and seek shelter at the abbey in Astarac. There they are greeted by abbot Planchard, who knows Thomas is after the Grail. The abbot advices Thomas that the grail should be destroyed because the world is not ready for it.

Meanwhile, Cardinal Louis Bessieres of Paris is making a “fake” grail so that he can be made Pope. His brother, Charles, is in charge of a band of men at arms whose job is to take the fake grail to Astarac and have the grail discovered after they capture Thomas.

Thomas cousin, Sir Guy Vexille, is also looking for the Grail. Guy’s men attack the abbey and kill Abbot Planchard, while Thomas and Genevieve are in hiding - thus witnessing the event. Not knowing what to do, Thomas and Genevieve escape back to the Castillon d’Arbizon to “die amongst friends.” They find the castle in siege by the new count of Berat - Joscelyn - and they enter the castle and they find the fake grail that was held by Charles.

Thomas figures out that the grail is fake and, as the siege concludes, Thomas kills his cousin, thus avenging his father’s death. He also finds the true grail, which was in Hookton all along.

Based on true events, the book is a pleasure to read. The writer develops his characters beautifully: they come to life masterfully, without becoming a caricature. Points of view are clearly marked and sometimes we take a look at the same events from more than point of view. The book has only two battles and is shorter so its a pleasure to read. I would have made all three parts of the book into just one book. The author could have saved the trouble of describing what had transpired in previous books, thus shortening the length of the tale and avoiding having to repeat himself to make each book stand on its own.

I read the book in three days and I recommend the book to anyone who, like me, enjoys historical fiction.
grand star
I've got some complaints about this one.

First, where did the romantic interest from the first two books go? A couple of brief lines alluding to her is not a satisfying way to write off a character, especially when there's barely a moment given to the establishment of the next romance. It's hard to care about their relationship when Thomas of Hookton seems predestined to bed every beautiful woman the series can conjure. What's a romance without tension?

Second, the contrivance of Rob and Thomas' falling out over this woman was aggravating. Their strong friendship established in the last book was far more powerful than the weak romance in this one.

Third, the Middle Ages were not some perpetual holocaust. Yes, I know Cornwell did not want to over-romanticize the era like some cloud-minded Victorian, but the inverse to portray the era as ubiquitously inhumane is equally erroneous. This bleak setting he's made carries over to all of his characters too, as none of them seem capable of joy. Even in their love they are grim. There was still room for pageantry and bright colors in the Hundred Years War and people could still smile.

But, for all my complaints, Cornwell remains uniquely adept at describing battles accurately and engagingly and that alone makes the story worth reading for those with a love of military history.