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by Edith Wharton
Download Tales of Men and Ghosts fb2
Genre Fiction
  • Author:
    Edith Wharton
  • ISBN:
    0848806654
  • ISBN13:
    978-0848806651
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Amereon Ltd (December 1, 1994)
  • Subcategory:
    Genre Fiction
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1138 kb
  • ePUB format
    1952 kb
  • DJVU format
    1110 kb
  • Rating:
    4.3
  • Votes:
    973
  • Formats:
    txt rtf doc lrf


We need your donations. The Project Gutenberg Literary Archive Foundation is a 501(c)(3) organization with EIN 64-6221541. Title: Tales Of Men And Ghosts.

WE had been put in the mood for ghosts, that evening, after an excellent dinner at our old friend Culwin’s, by a tale of Fred Murchard’s - the narrative of a strange personal visitation

WE had been put in the mood for ghosts, that evening, after an excellent dinner at our old friend Culwin’s, by a tale of Fred Murchard’s - the narrative of a strange personal visitation. Seen through the haze of our cigars, and by the drowsy gleam of a coal fire, Culwin’s library, with its oak walls and dark old bindings, made a good setting for such evocations; and ghostly experiences at first hand being, after Murchard’s brilliant opening, the only kind acceptable to us, we proceeded to take stock of our group and tax each. member for a contribution.

While claiming not to believe in ghosts.

Down his spine he felt the man's injured stare. Mr. Granice had always been so mild-spoken to his people - no doubt the odd change in his manner had already been noticed and discussed below stairs. And very likely they suspected the cause

Down his spine he felt the man's injured stare. And very likely they suspected the cause. He stood drumming on the writing-table till he heard the servant go out; then he threw himself into a chair.

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Wharton enjoys subjecting her subjects - all of them American gentlemen and gentlewomen, in the conventional senses of the word - to various moral tests and sometimes ironic tests. Some of the stories deal with the intellectual fashions of the day - "The Blond Beast" basing itself, to some degree, on Nietzsche, and "The Debt" on variants of Darwinism. For more free audio books or to become a volunteer reader, visit LibriVox. M4B audio book, part 1 (113mb) M4B audio book, part 2 (149mb).

Originally published in 1910, Tales and Men and Ghosts is a collection of short stories connected, as the title .

That said, the ghostly aspect is on the whole muted, this isn't a Poe pastiche although of course, given Wharton's appreciation of the man, it could have been. The closer connection is certainly Henry James given that Wharton's notion of ghostly phenomena is more towards the inherently psychological rather than spiritual. One story that does stand out is 'The Blond Beast' which has nothing to do with ghostly.

Tales of Men and Ghosts was published as a collection in 1910, though the first eight of the stories had earlier appeared in Scribner's and the last two in the Century Magazine. Despite the title, the men outnumber the ghosts, since only "The Eyes" and "Afterward" actually call on the supernatural. In only two of the stories are women the central characters, though elsewhere they play important roles. Wharton enjoys subjecting her subjects - all of them American gentlemen and gentlewomen, in the conventional senses of the word - to various moral tests.

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Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Tales of Men and Ghosts as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

She wrote novels of manners about the old New York society from which she came, but her attitude was consistently critical. Her irony and her satiric touches, as well as her insight into human character, continue to appeal to readers today. As a child, Wharton found refuge from the demands of her mother's social world in her father's library and in making up stories.

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Kezan
Twisted little stories delve deep into the darker parts of the human psyche. More men, fewer ghosts, and a couple of women. Tales for dark and stormy nights.
skriper
Detailed and intimate character presentations with lots of highlights of a certain segment of society at the turn of the century (19th to 20th, that is.) Literate, formal, satisfying.
fetish
WOULD BUY HERE AGAIN!
Levaq
This is a series of short stories taken from different walks of life all ending with a twist similar to what you would expect from reading O. Henry. The author provides the background that places you at the scene of activity; and at the conclusion, requires that moment of thought as human nature unfolds in an unexpected manner. Well worth reading. As a side point, the volunteer committee did an excellent job in consolidating and re-editing this book for publication.
Kulabandis
As usual, excellent writing from Edith Wharton. But most of these short stories ended abruptly - there was not a twist to be had as in the O. Henry style that one of the reviewers suggested. Still, worth a read though don't get too involved with the plot because, much as you assume the tale will continue in the next chapter, you will simply find that the new chapter begins an entirely new story altogether. Live with it.
DART-SKRIMER
Wonderful stories of interesting troubled people. The world she describes feels modern, and the details of living then are intriguing.
Mr.Savik
Edith Wharton is a skilled and elegant writer of fiction. "Tales of Men and Ghosts" is an unusual take on the genre.
If you're a huge Wharton fan like I am then you've probably read all her books. This was the last book by her standing for me and I have to say that while it's okay, that's it. It's just okay. Yes it's supernatural tales by the Queen of Writing (in my opinion) but she could have done better. Sad that she didn't.