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Download People of the Mesa: A Novel of Native America fb2

by Ardath Mayhar
Download People of the Mesa: A Novel of Native America fb2
Genre Fiction
  • Author:
    Ardath Mayhar
  • ISBN:
    143440305X
  • ISBN13:
    978-1434403056
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Wildside Press (March 5, 2009)
  • Pages:
    176 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Genre Fiction
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1964 kb
  • ePUB format
    1570 kb
  • DJVU format
    1172 kb
  • Rating:
    4.2
  • Votes:
    237
  • Formats:
    mobi lrf azw lit


People of the Mesa: A No. .has been added to your Cart. The story deals with the development of the cliff dwellings as a defence against these periodic waves of attack from other native American populations in the prehistory of the North American continent.

People of the Mesa: A No. The story is told through the eyes and thoughts of a seer of the tribe, called He Who Dreams the Past.

People of the Mesa book. When he finally senses peril, he fails to convince his Elders to seek shelter. The attack, when it comes, decimates the Anasazi, forcing them finally to build their cliffside cave dwellings at Mesa Verde. Ardath Mayhar is superb at creating an alien world from another time and place"-Robert Reginald.

Hunters of the Plains: A Novel of Prehistoric America. Vendetta: A Novel of the Old West. Monkey Station: The Macaque Cycle, Book One. Ardath Mayhar. Ardath Frances Hurst Mayhar was an American writer and poet. She began writing science fiction in 1979 after returning with her family to Texas from Oregon. She was nominated for the Mark Twain Award, and won the Balrog Award for a horror narrative poem in Masques I. She had numerous other nominations for awards in almost every fiction genre, and won many awards for poetry. In 2008 she was honored Ardath Frances Hurst Mayhar was an American writer and poet.

Ardath Mayhar is superb at creating an alien world from another time and place"-Robert Reginald. People of the Mesa - Ardath Mayhar. Read on the Scribd mobile app. Download the free Scribd mobile app to read anytime, anywhere. Publisher: Wildside PressReleased: Apr 20, 2017ISBN: 9781479426775Format: book. carousel previous carousel next. A Planet Called Heaven. The Door in the Hill: A Tale of the Turnipins. The Clarrington Heritage: A Gothic Tale of Terror.

Ardath Mayhar was born in Timpson, Texas on February 20, 1930. She began her writing career as a poet when she was 19 and began publishing science fiction in 1979. During her lifetime, she wrote more than 60 books in almost every fiction genre. She also wrote under the pseudonyms Frank Cannon, Frances Hurst and John Killdeer. She won the Balrog Award for a horror narrative poem in Masques I and was honored by the Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America as an Author Emeritus in 2008. She died on February 1, 2012 at the age of 81. People of the Mesa: A Novel of Native America - eBook.

Mayhar has a way of drawing the reader seamlessly into her historical narratives. You can smell the breath of the dire wolf as it closes in for the kill! - Robert Reginald. Read whenever, wherever. Your phone is always with you, so your books are too – even when you’re offline. Bookmate – an app that makes you want to read.

People of the Mesa: A Novel of Native America is an audiobook based on Ardath Mayhar's 1992 novel. It was released on February 23, 2012. Categories: Audiobooks.

Ardath Frances Hurst Mayhar (February 20, 1930 – February 1, 2012) was an American writer and poet. Mayhar wrote over 60 books ranging from science fiction to horror to young adult to historical to westerns, Some of her novels appeared under pseudonyms such as Frank Cannon, Frances Hurst, and John Killdeer. Mayhar began writing fantasy with a story in 1973, and fantasy novels in 1979 after returning with her family to Texas from Oregon.

Uhtatse becomes the "One Who Smells the Wind" for his Anasazi clan, and sends his mind searching outward for enemy tribes in the Great Plains. When he finally senses peril, he fails to convince his Elders to seek shelter. The attack, when it comes, decimates the Anasazi, forcing them finally to build their cliffside cave dwellings at Mesa Verde.

"Ardath Mayhar is superb at creating an alien world from another time and place"--Robert Reginald.


Pringles
I enjoyed the story in this book. You become engrossed with the lives and deaths of the characters, and almost feel you know them in the end. It is a good read.
Akisame
Love these books on early americans and Indians.
fire dancer
The People of the Mesa was an excellent read, propelling one to the vision and experience of the old ones in the pueblos. It also provides an alternate explanation for the violence and cannibalism found by archeologists.
Gavirim
The story is located in the Mesas of present day Colorado and Utah, an area I roamed as a child and youth. The story rings true to me. As I read it, I could see in my mind the locations described. For anybody who is interested in the early Hopi people, often misnamed the "Anasazi," or who just love a good story, well-told, I recommend this book.
Cerekelv
I bought this book for my wife, who loves to read, as a Christmas gift. I guess she should have given this review. My wife has almost all the books writen by the Gears
Frostdefender
The Anasazi pueblo culture is surrounded by mystery. This evocative book re-imagines their story through Uhtatse, designated as “One Who Smells the Wind” in his youth. With special skills and training, he garnered information about conditions in surrounding mesas, forests, and fields. He sensed weather and approaching people, giving advanced warning. He knew any disturbance among the animals. Thus his people could prepare for what was coming.

The writing style creates the feel and patterns of this ancient native culture. Quickly readers are immersed in rhythms of life on Mesa Verde, initially in huts and kivas atop the plateau, and later in cliff-dwellings to resist enemy attacks. Descriptions vividly portray daily routines in the village and Uhtatse’s work smelling the wind. Relationships among villagers feel authentic, a way of interacting shaped by long-standing implicit rules that kept the social order functioning. Emotional constraint and proper reaction were essential, even in love and family relations, though intently felt. There is austere beauty in these portrayals, fitting for their difficult lives.

The tragic story arc is foreshadowed from the outset, where we meet Uhtatse as an old man reviewing his life. We revisit him dying on a cold, windy outcropping above the canyon repeatedly between episodes set in the past. Increasing attacks from enemies seem inevitable in this harsh region with limited resources. Battles are graphic and brutal, and repeated losses tear at Uhtatse’s heart. His is a personal and tribal tragedy, with an odd, brief episode at the end when he bonds with a foreign woman who had suffered as much as he had. It’s a story filled with beauty and suffering, brutality and kindness, hope and despair, echoing off walls of long-abandoned ruins hanging on the cliffs.
Livina
This is the author's reconstruction of the life of the Anasazi cliff dwellers of the Southwestern United States, based on clues and artifacts discovered by archaeologists about this mysterious culture that thrived before the Pueblo Indians and before the arrival of the Europeans. Little factual detail is known about the Anasazi.

This historical fiction attempts to bring to life the character and culture of the Anasazi. The author portrays the mystical life of these people, connected spiritually to their environment, under pressure from invaders from the north and the south. The story deals with the development of the cliff dwellings as a defence against these periodic waves of attack from other native American populations in the prehistory of the North American continent.

The story is told through the eyes and thoughts of a seer of the tribe, called He Who Dreams the Past. A person of this name in each generation is responsible for mystically and factually knowing their history and projecting where the future will take them. He can also see current events through mystical out-of-body views of the surrounding countryside.

His skills are complemented by a woman with a similar role, named She Who Sees the Future. Together with others of the clan who have special gifts, the Anasazi people are guided and protected. But they still have to have warrior skills and defensive cunning to take advantage of their seers' knowledge of the enemy and their movements.

One of the goals of He Who Dreams the Past is to convince the various families of their people of the need to move into the hill caves that have been previously prepared and which are now being extended and new living areas prepared.

The plains people are more vulnerable, but some believe the attacks their people knew in previous generations will not occur again. But attacks do come, and the story portrays the changes that are coming about in the Anasazi culture due to the new challenges and opportunities.
Even though this story dosen't stack up to "Voice of the Eagle", it still is a good light read. The creation of the cliff houses is really kinda skipped over, and about 10 years pass by in less than half a page and I am still trying to figure out the "gift" that Uhtatse has, I think it my be that he is an empath or something.
A nice light read.