Download Alice Adams fb2

by Booth Tarkington
Download Alice Adams fb2
Genre Fiction
  • Author:
    Booth Tarkington
  • ISBN:
    1595474544
  • ISBN13:
    978-1595474544
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    NuVision Publications, LLC (May 6, 2010)
  • Pages:
    228 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Genre Fiction
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1681 kb
  • ePUB format
    1418 kb
  • DJVU format
    1175 kb
  • Rating:
    4.8
  • Votes:
    813
  • Formats:
    lit mbr lrf docx


Alice Adams by Booth Tarkington Scanned by Charles Keller with OmniPage Professional OCR software.

Alice Adams by Booth Tarkington Scanned by Charles Keller with OmniPage Professional OCR software. Please note: neither this list nor its contents are final till midnight of the last day of the month of any such announcement. The official release date of all Project Gutenberg Etexts is at Midnight, Central Time, of the last day of the stated month.

FREE shipping on qualifying offers. A compelling satire, Alice Adams details irresistible characteristics of social status in a small Midwestern town. Mr. and Mrs. Adams and their two children are members of the lower middle-class.

Newton Booth Tarkington (July 29, 1869 – May 19, 1946) was an American novelist and dramatist best known for his novels The Magnificent Ambersons and Alice Adams. He is one of only three novelists to win the Pulitzer Prize for Fiction more than once, along with William Faulkner and John Updike. Although he is little read now, in the 1910s and 1920s he was considered America's greatest living author. Several of his stories were adapted to film.

Alice Adams – Ebook written by Booth Tarkington. Read this book using Google Play Books app on your PC, android, iOS devices. Download for offline reading, highlight, bookmark or take notes while you read Alice Adams. This story shows the growing pains of a high school girl who failed to crash small-town society.

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Newton Booth Tarkington was born in Indianapolis, Indiana on July 29, 1869

Alice Adams by Booth Tarkington (read 24 Apr 1958) (Pulitzer fiction prize for 1922) I read this because it won the Pulitzer fiction prize for 1922. Newton Booth Tarkington was born in Indianapolis, Indiana on July 29, 1869. He was educated at Phillips Exeter Academy, than spent his first two years of college at Purdue University and his last two at Princeton University. Upon leaving Princeton, he returned to Indiana determined to pursue a career as a writer.

She had remained upon her knees while she read the letter; now she sank backward, sitting upon the floor with her hands behind her, an unconscious relaxing for better ease to think.

She had remained upon her knees while she read the letter; now she sank backward, sitting upon the floor with her hands behind her, an unconscious relaxing for better ease to think re had fallen a look of wonder. For the first time she was vaguely perceiving that life is everlasting movement. Youth really believes what is running water to be a permanent crystallization and sees time fixed to a point: some people have dark hair, some people have blond hair, some people have gray hair

LibriVox recording of Alice Adams by Booth Tarkington Read by Jeannie A Pulitzer Prize-winning novel, Alice . I guess during the Depression years they wanted happy endings but the book's ending in its own way was even more happier and noble than the movies' ludicrous ending.

LibriVox recording of Alice Adams by Booth Tarkington Read by Jeannie A Pulitzer Prize-winning novel, Alice Adams chronicles the attempts of a lower middle.

A Pulitzer Prize-winning novel, Alice Adams chronicles the attempts of a lower middle class American midwestern family at the turn .

A Pulitzer Prize-winning novel, Alice Adams chronicles the attempts of a lower middle class American midwestern family at the turn of the 20th century to climb the social ladder. CHAPTER I. The patient, an old fashioned man, thought the nurse made a mistake in keeping both of the windows open, and her sprightly disregard of his protests added something to his hatred of her. Every evening he told her that anybody with ordinary gumption ought to realize that night air was bad for the human frame.

This compelling satire details irresistible characteristics of social status in a small Midwestern town. Mr. and Mrs. Adams and their two children are members of the lower middle-class. Their daughter, Alice, wrestles with this economic classification and attempts to make the society folk of the town appreciate her. Because Alice has no social influence nor wealth and her presence is held in disregard by prospective suitors, Mrs. Adams tries to improve the situation by persuading her husband to leave a job he's held all his life and to establish a new career. After much apprehension and in possession of a glue formula stolen from his previous employer, he resigns his mediocre but satisfying employment which puts him in a predicament that leads to his professional downfall. Tarkington's understanding of class rivalries, social condescension, and financial avarice is evident in this tale where his main point indicates that in every joyless moment hope, though unexpected, is attainable. He illustrates how the Adams' laborious efforts are ultimately unsuccessful. Any intrusion by Alice and her mother on the upper class is unlikely and Tarkington's depiction of such is secretly amusing.

Mejora
Alice Adams is about a somewhat flighty and superficial, but ambitious, young woman trying to maintain a moneyed air to the world, even though her family, though not impoverished, are not prosperous. Alice wants to climb the social ladder, but is inhibited by her family's status. Alice's father, Virgil, who is home sick when the novel opens, has worked his entire life for another businessman but has not received any substantial promotions or raises and pay, much to the dismay of Alice's mother. Alice's mother is a hen-pecking sort convinced that Alice's father has a way to make them all rich. Alice's mother harps continually on what Alex's father could do to improve their situation, because she wants to see her children be equal in society with children from more fashionable and rich families. Virgil eventually capitulates, with horrendous results.

In the meantime, Alice gains the attention of a well-off young man, Arthur Russell, who is a cousin of her "best friend" Mildred Palmer. I put "best friend" in quotes because while this is Alice's view, Mildred does little more than tolerate Alice and doesn't want her at her parties. Alice's life is a string of lies, one told after another, lies told to cover up other lies, in the vain hope of camaflouging her real situation in order to gain elevation in society and to win over Arthur. In fact, Alice continually tells Arthur "not to believe what other people say about her" and requests he not bring up her name around Mildred or any other members of the upper crust because she didn't want Arthur to hear "the lies they would tell about her".

In the end, the courtship does proceed and Alice's mother insists that Arthur must come to dinner at the family's home. All during the courtship, Arthur has never been inside Alice's home so Alice is reluctant to have him to dinner. She doesn't want Arthur to see the inside of their house or the fact that they don't have servants. The day ends up being an extremely hot one, Alice's mother has chosen too heavy a menu, and has hired servants that are not only unmanageable but rude. Virgil looks terrible in his suit that is too big and is in obvious need of mending. The entire evening ends up being a huge embarrassment to Alice; however, what she doesn't know is that Arthur, for the first time that day, did hear her name and her father's name in conversation. Earlier, Arthur had been speaking with his cousin Mildred and her parents and Alice's father came up in the conversation in a negative way. His scheme to earn more money involved appropriating a recipe for liquid glue from his employer and putting it in production on his own. Mildred's mother had nothing good to say about Alice and said she was a "pushy, pushing sort of girl." Arthur was shocked to hear the news about Alice's family, that they were not rich, that Alice's father was not a successful businessman, and in fact was trying to set up business with his employer's stolen formula, and that Alice was not as she had presented herself to be. Alice perceived the difference in Arthur during the ill-fated dinner and knew by the end of the evening the courtship would not continue.

Virgil's ex-boss, JA Lamb, decides to open a mammoth factory right next to Vergil's so that Virgil can't possibly compete. Virgil and Lamb finally have words about Virgil taking the glue formula, but during the conversation, Virgil once again collapses and his boss has him taken home to bed. JA Lamb offers to buy Virgil out for an amount that will pay off his debts and his mortgage. Virgil remains sick through the end of the book and Alice's mother begins to take in borders to help with the expenses. Alice, at the end, decides she needs to look into going to a business school which before, she considered would drag her down to "hideous obscurity".

I liked this book and would recommend it to anyone looking for an insight into lower middle-class and upper class mentality in a small midwestern town at a time between WWI and WW2. It was infuriating sometimes watching Alice dig herself in deeper and deeper rather than just telling the truth; however, there weren't many options for women at that time and the best option was to secure a rich or well-off husband, so that puts some (only some) of Alice's actions into perspective. As a reader, though, you could see that it wasn't going to work out well and that Alice was her own worst enemy. By the end of the book, I believe Alice had made a significant shift in her ideas about herself and her perceptions. Deciding to take an action (going to the business school), which she had previously found unconscionable, showed development beyond who she was at the start of the book, and her last, chance meeting with Arthur demonstrated that she had gained aplomb and poise, perhaps a little more confidence, and was able to accept and be pleased with the fact that the relationship was over.
Yndanol
Alice Adams is my least favorite Booth Tarkington. It is four stars, mostly for the clever, low speed turn around ending. Tarkington continues to remind us that: “the familiar coating of smoke and grime... Yet here was not fault of housewifery; the curse could not be lifted, as the ingrained smudges permanent on the once white woodwork proved. The grime was perpetually renewed; scrubbing only ground it in.” is also the soot of wealth. So maybe 3.5 stars but rounded up because of the plot rather than the writing or the characters.

The Adams family, with only 1 ‘d’ so no Lurch the butler or sword play, had been running with the upper class if only the upper class as it existed in a small mid-western industrial location. The same kind of town that played host for the Magnificent Ambersons Trilogy. For a while, Mr. Adams had been an up and comer but somewhere that ceased to be true. He is now an older man, recovering slowly but still loyally looked after by his well to do employer.
His wife is on him constantly about his failure to take the one bold step that would have kept them in with the social set. His daughter is a nice girl, but has become adept at the little lies and self-delusions that allow her to push herself into that social class wherein she hopes to land a husband. Very early on we are told that she has no marketable skills and the one out for her, secretarial school is a dark place where losers go to accept their status as losers.

Into this once happy and now slowly and not gracefully aging house comes hope in the form of Arthur Russell. A nice man, with money and good looks. He is from out of town and so knows little about the Miss Alice or her family. The immediate problem is her ability to win her man before he learns too much.

This is the surface problem. For the reader the real issues are: who is the reader to believe? Just how far will the family go for their daughter? Tarkington will ask us to evaluate and reevaluate almost every character in the book. That is where his plotting lifts this book to that fourth star.
Billy Granson
There's something so rewarding about discovering an older gem that's been around for decades, and it's sad to think how many great books go unnoticed because they're perceived as "old" and therefore lacking the elements that captivate readers today.

I really enjoyed "Alice Adams." While it's a fairly typical (especially for its time) class/social study, the reader really empathizes with Alice and dreads the inevitable embarrassment lurking around the corner.

The dinner scene, where Alice and her mother go so very over the top in their idea of what "the other half" would expect, is so very well done, not only vividly imagined but managing to be both hilarious and tragic at the same time. It's the scene I'll most remember from the book.

I would expect that in this day and age, more people have seen the movie version with Katharine Hepburn than have read the book. While the movie is okay too, would definitely recommend the book as it differs from the movie in some ways.